Washington

Washington Theater moves forward with renovation plans



a large room


© Provided by KHQA Quincy/Hannibal


New plans are now in place to help bring a historic Quincy theater back to life.

The Washington Theater Commission approved an architectural plan for the 96-year-old theater this week.

It includes spending $70,000 to document the proposed use of the theater, develop a layout, and begin a new fundraising phase for the project.

The commission is working with a professional theater consultant and architect called “Killis Almond.”

It’s been a key member in renovating more than 80 historic theaters.

Commission President Brian Heinze says timing couldn’t be better for these unfolding plans.

“In the feasibility study, they said an opened theater — not just a movie theater but a multi-purpose venue — could bring up to $4 million into the city. So the timing is right between the riverfront restoration and what they want to do and the downtown revitalization,” Heinze said.

The plan will be funded entirely by fundraising efforts of friends of the Washington Theater.

The plan will be presented to the Quincy City Council for approval.

The City of Quincy owns Washington Theater.

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Best Nursing Homes – Washington

America’s Best Nursing Homes 2021


Choosing a nursing home for an aging family member has always been a heavy responsibility. As the COVID-19 pandemic showed with heartbreaking clarity, it can even be a matter of life and death.

That’s why Newsweek once again partnered with respected global data research firm Statista to establish a ranking of Best Nursing Homes, providing information and insights to help our readers understand their options at a very challenging time.

America’s Best Nursing Homes 2021 highlights the nation’s top nursing homes (compared to others in the same state) based on performance data, peer recommendations and the facility’s handling of the COVID-19 threat. In building these rankings, Statista and Newsweek took extensive, multiple measures to address the impact of the outbreak. Our objective: to recognize the facilities which have put in place the best possible responses and protocols.

Our ranking identifies the 400 top facilities across 20 states. If you need to choose a place for a loved one, we hope this list of Best Nursing Homes 2021 will help make that decision easier and the burden, lighter.

If your facility is listed below, you can find out more about the licensing options visiting the Statista website.

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American Homes 4 Rent Opens Bella Vista Community in Marysville, Washington

AGOURA HILLS, Calif., Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — American Homes 4 Rent (NYSE: AMH) is pleased to introduce Bella Vista in Marysville, Wash., which joins its rapidly growing family of newly built single-family rental home communities. Bella Vista is American Homes 4 Rent’s (“AH4R”) 58th new rental home community and its fourth in the Seattle market, building upon the success of its Autumn Crest, Liberty Meadows and Royal Firs communities.

“American Homes 4 Rent is meeting the demand for new rental housing in the Greater Seattle market with our new Bella Vista community,” said Zack Johnson, Executive Vice President of Acquisitions & Development for AH4R. “We continue to deliver well-located communities through our one-of-a kind AMH Development homebuilding arm that is America’s leading builder of communities for rent.”

Bella Vista adds 24 homes built and operated by AH4R to its existing portfolio of more than 800 units in the Seattle market.

“AH4R is revolutionizing the industry as the nation’s leading builder of single-family rental communities,” said Robert Broad, Senior Vice President of Development for AH4R. “Our new Bella Vista community offers all the benefits of single-family living with the financial flexibility and low-maintenance lifestyle of leasing.”

The homes at Bella Vista feature upscale finishes that residents appreciate, along with the benefits of lawn care and pet-friendly yards. All homes are designed with open concept floorplans, granite countertops, stainless-steel appliances, luxury vinyl plank flooring, elegant bathrooms, quality fixtures and two-car garages.     

Bella Vista features three- and four-bedroom homes ranging in size from approximately 2,000 to 2,400 square feet. Pricing starts from the $2,500s per month. The well-located neighborhood has amazing views of Puget Sound and Whidbey Island, and provides residents with quick access to local job centers, dining, shopping and entertainment.

Prospective residents are encouraged

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Nursing homes in Washington state struggled with adequate staffing for years. Then coronavirus struck.

In early March, state inspectors entered a sprawling nursing home in the rural southeast corner of King County where concerns over thin staffing were mounting just as COVID-19 began to spread across the state.

One resident inside the Enumclaw Health and Rehabilitation Center said she hadn’t been bathed for nearly three weeks after she first arrived, according to inspection records. Another described waiting roughly 15 minutes for help after her roommate fell on the floor, while others told of even longer waits for help, lasting 45 minutes or more.

“Sometimes there are so few people in the building,” the resident told inspectors, “if there were an emergency, it would be a calamity.”

Within weeks, coronavirus entered the nursing home, and workers scrambled to help ailing residents, as some got sick themselves. In all, the outbreak killed 26 people, according to the state.

As COVID-19 devastated nursing homes across the state, long-standing staffing woes created a perfect storm at many facilities at a time when workers were needed most. Even though inspectors had routinely found appalling instances of time-strapped staff and patient suffering over the years, Washington state hadn’t raised its standard for adequate staffing.

A Seattle Times analysis found that inspectors cited 118, or more than half, of the state’s skilled nursing facilities a total of 225 times for having insufficient or unqualified staff, according to federal data from 2018 through the start of the pandemic. The state rarely penalized nursing homes for these deficiencies, according to an analysis of thousands of pages of enforcement documents.

Times Watchdog reporting digs deep to expose wrongdoing and hold powerful interests accountable to the public. Support watchdog journalism with a tax-deductible donation to The Seattle Times Investigative Journalism Fund.

In dozens of interviews and a review of inspection reports, workers described poor wages

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