water

Lakewood eyeing OPWC funds for water main improvements throughout city

LAKEWOOD, Ohio — This summer Lakewood was awarded $750,000 in Water Main Replacement Project funds from the Ohio Public Works Commission (OPWC).

Now the city is planning to begin work next spring on Lauderdale Avenue (between Detroit and Madison avenues), Leedale Avenue (between Lake Avenue and Edgewater Boulevard) and Elbur Avenue (Between Athens Avenue and Lakewood Heights Boulevard).

“This is all part of our yearly OPWC grant application for water main improvements,” Lakewood City Engineer Mark K. Papke said. “These projects are currently in design. They’ll be going out to bid in the first quarter 2021, start in May and wrap up around November.”

The project cost is $4,716,850. In addition to the grant, the OPWC is also providing a zero-percent 20-year loan for $866,850. That means the city’s total contribution is nearly $4 million.

“These water mains were installed in the early 1900s,” Papke said. “Most of them are six-inch in diameter and cast iron. They get tuberculated — the metal grows on the inside of the pipe and reduces the diameter, which affects water flow.

“Also a lot of these have lead service connections that are being replaced with copper. So we upsized the water main to eight-inch diameter and put in six-inch fire hydrants rather than the existing four-inch. It improves the flow.”

Lakewood is also applying for the next round of OPWC funds to cover a sewer improvement project planned for portions of Andrews Avenue (Detroit Avenue to Clifton Boulevard) and Gladys Avenue (Detroit Avenue to Clifton Boulevard).

“Length-wise, the project is similar to the 2021 project, but we’re also including some necessary sewer improvements,” Papke said. “Some areas require heavier sewer upgrades than other ones.”

The city engineer said Lakewood not only entered into the agreement in July, but is currently at 75 percent of

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Bohnett Park to Close for Renovation, Storm Water Treatment Project | Local News

October 12, 2020
| 12:10 p.m.

Bohnett Park in Santa Barbara is scheduled to close beginning Thursday, Oct. 15 for construction of a park improvement and storm water treatment project.

The park improvement project, developed with extensive community input, includes the installation of new turf and landscaping, irrigation, picnic tables along Old Mission Creek, barbecue grills, trash and coal receptacles, accessible park entrance and walkways, and new streetscape fencing.

“Bohnett Park is a key recreational area for the Westside,” said Parks and Recreation director Jill Zachary. “We are pleased to be moving forward with a project that will make the park more usable for all.”

The storm water improvement portion of the project includes the installation of underground gravel filled chambers that will capture, treat and infiltrate storm water runoff from the neighborhood surrounding Bohnett Park.

Retaining the storm water on site and allowing it to slowly infiltrate into the ground will help improve water quality in Old Mission Creek.

Civic Construction Associates be doing the construction work, which is expected to take about three months. Work will take place 7 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays. The upper park area along San Andres Street will remain open during construction.

The project is funded by a Community Development Block Grant, the city of Santa Barbara General Fund, and by hotel visitors through Measure B.
 
For more information on park improvements, contact Keven Strasburg, 805-897-1906 or [email protected] For more on the storm water project, contact George Johnson, 805) 897-1958 or [email protected]
 

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Reimagining commercial bathroom design to boost water savings

‘Reimagining our future’ – the theme for this year’s Water Week is truly inspirational, especially for architects who have an important role to play in mitigating global concerns about water security.

The ongoing climate change crisis makes it imperative for all stakeholders to invest more in water saving technologies across all parts of society.

By reimagining water usage in commercial bathrooms, architects and designers can future-proof their projects – with a little help from Uridan Waterless Solutions, and their latest touchless and sustainable waterless urinals.

The waterless urinal of choice since 2003, Uridan combines stunning industrial design with sustainable management of water and energy. With a single installation of a Uridan waterless urinal, a building can save up to 60,000 litres of clean drinking water per year, which would have otherwise been flushed out in a conventional urinal.

By using no water, the Uridan collection makes for a more environment-friendly option for any commercial bathroom fit-out as well as a real solution for contact-free servicing.

The new Intelligent DrainCover revolutionises waterless urinal functionality, creating not only best-practice solutions for commercial amenities but also reimagining bathroom functionality with a completely touchless solution. This is especially important in these times of heightened awareness around the transmission of infection.

It’s time for all of us to reimagine our future and rethink water usage in commercial bathrooms.

It’s time to choose Uridan waterless urinals. 

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Jackson considering contractors to help maintain water billing system

JACKSON, Miss. (WLBT) – Days after the city of Jackson brought on a firm to help it draw up plans for a new water billing system, Jackson is looking at bringing on two contractors to help maintain the existing one.



text, whiteboard: WLBT


© Provided by Jackson WLBT
WLBT

The city council is considering two maintenance agreements, both of which members are expected to vote on at their October 13 meeting.

The first contract is with Mueller Systems, a $270,000, six-month deal to allow the firm to maintain the city’s “meter data management software.”

The other is with Keystone Utility Systems, to provide maintenance to meters and other billing system infrastructure in the field. That contract is for $146,000 and also will run for six months.

Both contracts also include the option to extend.

City officials likely will need to extend them, with public works officials saying it could take 12 to 18 months to put a new billing system in place.

The council’s Water and Sewer Infrastructure Ad-Hoc Committee discussed the proposals at its October 8 meeting.

Mueller was one of the subcontractors working on the Siemens contract. The city has claimed that the subcontractor knowingly installed faulty meters as part of the work.

Siemens was brought on in 2013 to completely overhaul the city’s water billing system. Work included replacing tens of thousands of water meters across Jackson, installing new software at the billing office and a new communications network to transmit meter data to the billing office.

Citing complications with the system, Jackson sued Siemens in 2019. Earlier this year, the city settled its suit with the firm for approximately $90 million.

Even with that suit was ongoing, the city continued to work with the Massachusetts-based Mueller to help address bugs with the system. Many of those bugs still

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State cites former Flint water service line contractor for soil erosion at old dump site

FLINT, MI – A former contractor that excavated water service lines in Flint has been cited by the state for not having a soil erosion and sediment control permit for property it owns in the city, a site that was used to dump construction waste.



a train traveling down train tracks near a forest: The state of Michigan has cited former Flint water service line contractor WT Stevens for a dumping ground in the city that was created without a permit. The dumping ground is seen here on Monday, Oct. 5, 2020 on Flint's north side.


© Jake May | MLive.com/Jake May | Mlive.com/mlive.com/TNS
The state of Michigan has cited former Flint water service line contractor WT Stevens for a dumping ground in the city that was created without a permit. The dumping ground is seen here on Monday, Oct. 5, 2020 on Flint’s north side.

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy notified W.T. Stevens Construction Inc. of its violation of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act for its property in the area of Premier Street and East Mott Avenue, just east of Horton Avenue, in a Sept. 30 letter. That’s near I-475 and East Pierson Road on the city’s north side.



a tree in a forest: The state of Michigan has cited former Flint water service line contractor WT Stevens for a dumping ground in the city that was created without a permit. The dumping ground is seen here on Monday, Oct. 5, 2020 on Flint's north side.


© Jake May | MLive.com/Jake May | Mlive.com/mlive.com/TNS
The state of Michigan has cited former Flint water service line contractor WT Stevens for a dumping ground in the city that was created without a permit. The dumping ground is seen here on Monday, Oct. 5, 2020 on Flint’s north side.

The company was awarded contracts worth more than $27 million to replace lead and galvanized water service lines in Flint starting in 2017.

For most of this year, the company and the city have been locked in disagreements over the condition of the former dump site, and in August and September, the Genesee County Drain Commissioner’s Office also issued notices of violation for the company’s property, alleging it failed to obtain a soil erosion and sediment control permit and to adequately install and maintain erosion and sediment control on site.



a person sitting on a rock: The state of Michigan has cited former Flint water service line contractor WT Stevens for a dumping ground in the city that was created without a permit. The dumping ground is seen here on Monday, Oct. 5, 2020 on Flint's north side.


© Jake May | MLive.com/Jake

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