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County reports new coronavirus deaths at nursing homes for first time in 3 weeks

For the first time in three weeks, San Diego County reported new coronavirus deaths among residents and health care workers at skilled nursing facilities.

As of Wednesday, there have been 173 deaths from COVID-19 among nursing home staff and residents combined, up from 168 reported during the last two weeks. San Diego County reported 1,139 cases of novel coronavirus among nursing home residents and 729 cases among health care workers Wednesday, up from 1,103 and 717 last week.

One new outbreak in skilled nursing homes was reported by the county this week, bringing the total to 84 over the course of the pandemic. There are 20 nursing home outbreaks that are still deemed active, down from the 21 active ones reported last week.

Unlike community outbreaks that are defined as three or more linked cases from separate households, outbreaks in nursing homes only need one case among either residents or health care workers. An outbreak is considered inactive once no one at the facility has tested positive for novel coronavirus for at least two weeks.

According to the California Department of Public health database, 53 of the county’s 86 skilled nursing facilities have been approved to resume indoor visitations.

Only five facilities in the county haven’t recorded a single case among either residents or health care workers, according to the state’s database. They are Amaya Springs Health Care Center in Spring Valley, Arroyo Vista Nursing Center in San Diego, Monte Vista Lodge in Lemon Grove, Somerset Subacute and Care in El Cajon, and Valle Vista Convalescent Hospital in Escondido.

Those looking for COVID-19 statistics or visitation information at a specific skilled nursing facility can view the online version of this story at http://bit.ly/SNFOct7 to search the full dataset.

Nursing home administrators were reminded Monday of their obligation to help residents

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Homes sold two weeks faster in September due to unusual surge in demand

  • It took just 54 days to sell a home in September. That is the shortest time since realtor.com began tracking this metric in 2016. Back then it took 78 days.
  • The median price of a home sold in September was $350,000, up just over 11% annually.



a person standing in front of a building: People walk into a house for sale in Floral Park, Nassau County, New York, the United States, on Sept. 6, 2020. Home buyers eying for cozy backyards and more office space are staging bidding wars in the suburbs surrounding New York City amid the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.


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People walk into a house for sale in Floral Park, Nassau County, New York, the United States, on Sept. 6, 2020. Home buyers eying for cozy backyards and more office space are staging bidding wars in the suburbs surrounding New York City amid the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Homebuyers hoping that a seasonal slowdown in the housing market would dampen rising prices can forget about it.

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More buyers piled into the fray in September, spurred by record-low mortgage rates and a pandemic-induced stay-at-home culture, pushing sales to an even faster pace.

In the first read on September demand, homes sold 12 days faster than they did a year ago, according to realtor.com. Homes usually sell 25% faster in September than at the start of the year, but this year they sold 39% faster.

It took just 54 days to sell a home during the month. That is the shortest time since realtor.com began tracking this metric in 2016. Back then it took 78 days.

Regionally, properties in the Northeast spent 13 fewer days on the market than last year, while those in the South sold 11 days faster. In the Midwest it took nine fewer days to sell a home and seven fewer in the West. In the 50 largest metropolitan housing markets, the typical home sold in 44 days, 10 days faster than last year.

“Many buyers tend to put their home search on hold after the start of the school year, but remote learning and

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