workforce

Store planning and workforce management improvement

US: C&S names Bob Palmer CEO
C&S Wholesale Grocers Inc., the largest wholesale grocery supply company in the United States, has appointed Bob Palmer CEO, succeeding Michael A. Duffy in the role. “C&S has been a leader in the rapidly changing grocery industry for over 102 years”, said Rick Cohen, chairman of Keene, New Hampshire-based C&S. “We will continue to drive innovation and adapt to the dynamic market conditions to better serve and support our customers. These unique times have required us to refocus our efforts and priorities”.
Source: progressivegrocer.com 

US: Fresh food makes pandemic-stressed consumers happy
What made consumers happy during the pandemic? Fresh food – at least according to Deloitte. In its new “The Future of Fresh: Patterns from the Pandemic” report, Deloitte found that nine of 10 survey respondents said that fresh food literally makes them happy. The findings were based on interviews of 2,000 adults (age 18 to 70) in the United States who influenced fresh food purchases in their households. The interviews were conducted in July.
Source: progressivegrocer.com 

US: Smart & Final improves store planning, workforce management
Smart & Final has implemented Logile Inc.’s store-planning and workforce management technology solutions in all of its stores. According to Logile, these solutions enable retailers to understand true labor costs and impacts, improve labor use, and achieve unparalleled operational optimization and visibility. Logile’s software supports compliance with regulatory requirements, including predictive scheduling, which applies to several Smart & Final market areas.
Source: progressivegrocer.com 

US: Consumers cut down grocery trips but still overspend
Consumers are making fewer trips to the grocery story but are spending more, according to new LendingTree data that offers one of the most recent views of food retail trends during the pandemic. The Charlotte, North Carolina-based online lending marketplace found that U.S. consumers now spend

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150 new homes slated near Summerville; workforce townhomes on way to Mount Pleasant | Real Estate

SUMMERVILLE — More new houses are on the way to the Summerville area.

Tallahassee, Fla.-based DeVoro Homes recently bought 97 acres near S.C. Highway 61 and Old Beech Hill Road for $1.52 million, or about $15,700 an acre, where 150 new homes are planned, according to Robert Pratt, a commercial real estate agent with RE/Max Pro Realty, who handled the transaction for the seller.



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The property, west of the Ashley River, was owned by members of the Tucker family, according to Dorchester County land records.

A representative of DeVoro Homes did not respond for comment on a development timeline or home prices.

The proposed project follows the start of land clearing a few miles to the east on S.C. Highway 61 for 950 new residences set to be developed by homebuilder Ashton Woods in part of the 6,600-acre Watson Hill tract in North Charleston.



Gregorie Ferry Townhomes

Gregorie Ferry Townhomes are under construction in northern Mount Pleasant and will be available by next summer. Rendering/Broadhill Studios


Workforce housing

Construction is underway on Mount Pleasant’s first workforce housing neighborhood of townhomes.

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Located on Winnowing Way off S.C. Highway 41, the 36-unit Gregorie Ferry Towns community is being built to meet the needs of police officers, firefighters, school teachers, health care workers and hospitality industry employees.



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With 2½- and 3½-bath models, the 36 two- and three-bedroom townhomes range from 984 square feet to 1,216 square feet. They are priced from $249,900 to $287,900, and require a minimal down payment.

When the development was first announced last December, the homes were slated for buyers with incomes between $40,000 and $62,000 so they could own homes in upper Mount Pleasant, where the

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