Works

Vicky Hartzler works for defense contractors, not Missouri

Lindsey Simmons

Lindsey Simmons

Facebook/Lindsey Simmons

I counted the doctor’s footsteps as she left the room, gauging how much time I had before she returned. My sweaty fingers pulled out my cellphone and I quickly tried to take video of the room and my growing pregnant belly — but I miscalculated. My doctor stepped back inside. I felt my face grow red.

“I’m alone,” my voice cracked as my doctor sat down and held my free hand. “I’m alone. My husband is deployed — I just don’t want him to miss any of this. He won’t return until our baby is born.”

Without missing a beat, she grabbed my phone, turned the ultrasound back on and helped me record a video of my baby sucking his thumb, growing big and strong. I sent it to my husband immediately.

There is nothing easy about being a military family. It certainly is not easy for the service member, but the toll it takes on the spouses and children left at home wafts into conversation as whispers that are soon forgotten.

During my sixth month of pregnancy, my husband was sent to a forward location in Syria, where it was difficult to maintain a regular supply chain. He relied upon the assistance of local Kurdish allies for necessities such as food. Not long after, pro-Syria militants, including Russian mercenaries, attacked American soldiers in the region, including my husband’s unit. It was the deadliest battle in Syria at the time. No American lives were lost, but hundreds of pro-Syrian fighters were killed.

Because of the strength of the U.S.-Kurdish alliance, my husband returned home safely — and earlier than expected, just in time for the birth of our son, Jace.

Not long after my husband’s return, we watched the president of the United States not only

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PIAC calls for sanctions against contractors who execute shoddy works

General News of Wednesday, 14 October 2020

Source: GNA

2020-10-14

PIAC has oversight responsibility over the managment of the country's petroleum resourcesPIAC has oversight responsibility over the managment of the country’s petroleum resources

The Public Interest and Accountability Committee (PIAC) has called on government to initiate punitive measures against contractors who execute shoddy works on oil-funded projects.

PIAC, which has oversight responsibility over the management of the country’s petroleum revenues, has noted with concern the practice of some contractors doing sub-standard works defeating the purpose of value for money for the use of petroleum revenues.

It is important to note that petroleum revenues come from a depleting resource base, a reason the law provided for using Petroleum revenue in ways that support intergenerational benefit.

The Committee also called on government to recognize other contractors who have demonstrated value for the use of petroleum revenues through the delivery of good projects.

The Chairman of PIAC, Mr Noble Wadzah made the call after he led a PIAC team to visit selected oil-funded projects in the Eastern Region. The exercise forms part of the Committee’s regular activity to identify with effective use of the country’s petroleum revenues.

The projects the community visited included the Construction of Community Health-Based Planning Service (CHPS) compound at Ahankrasu, construction of Irrigation Infrastructure at Aditrase and Kornokle in the Yilo Krobo District and the Payment for a 3-Unit classroom block at Amanase Aboabo JHS and Owusu Wawase D/A Primary.

The rest are Bitumen Surfacing of New Tafo–Nobi–Samlesi–Anwiabeng Feeder roads, Construction of Irrigation Infrastructure at Aditrase and Kornole in the Yilo Krobo District and upgrading of Kade Wenchi Akim Oda Roads.

On the CHPS compound, information made available to the PIAC Team indicated that the contract was awarded in November 2018.

As at the time of PIAC’s visit, main construction works on the CHPS have been completed, finishing works were

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Punish contractors who execute shoddy works on oil-funded projects – PIAC to government

The Public Interest and Accountability Committee has urged government to initiate punitive measures against contractors who execute shoddy works on oil-funded projects. 

According to PIAC, which has oversight responsibility over the management of the country’s petroleum revenues, such practice defeats the purpose of value for money for the use of petroleum revenues.

It explained that the petroleum revenues come from a depleting resource base, a reason the law provided for using Petroleum revenue in ways that support intergenerational benefit.

The Committee also called on government to recognize other contractors who have demonstrated value for the use of petroleum revenues through the delivery of good projects.

The Chairman of PIAC, Noble Wadzah made the call after he led a PIAC team to visit selected oil-funded projects in the Eastern Region.

The exercise forms part of the Committees regular activity to identify with effective use of the countries petroleum revenues.

The projects the community visited included the Construction of Community Health-Based Planning Service (CHPS) compound at Ahankrasu, construction of Irrigation Infrastructure at Aditrase and Kornokle in the Yilo Krobo District and the Payment for a 3-Unit classroom block at Amanase Aboabo JHS and Owusu Wawase D/A Primary.

The rest are Bitumen Surfacing of New Tafo – Nobi – Samlesi – Anwiabeng Feeder roads, Construction of Irrigation Infrastructure at Aditrase and Kornole in the Yilo Krobo District and upgrading of Kade Wenchi Akim Oda Roads.

CHPS compound

Information made available to the PIAC Team indicated that the contract was awarded in November 2018. As at the time of PIAC’s visit, main construction works on the CHPS have been completed, finishing works were ongoing, while external works were underway. Supply and installation of medical equipment was yet to begin. The overall progress stands at 95 per cent.

The construction of the CHPS compound, which

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Park improvements coming to Legion Lake, Brigance Park, possible splash pad in the works | Chickasaw Journal

Legion Lake Park on Dulaney Street is slated for some improvements in 2021 after the Mississippi Legislature appropriated $150,000 for park upgrades. The appropriation request was made by the Chickasaw Development Foundation (CDF) during the 2020 session.

CDF director, Sean Johnson, added the park improvements to the request after Houston won a $25,000 grant from the Levitt Foundation to hold a ten-week concert series at the park.

“We made a couple of requests for quality of life improvement projects during the last session. We requested $250,000 to refurbish the old theater downtown into a public arts space, and $150,000 for upgrading the park. Legislators Jon Lancaster and Ben Suber were able to shepherd the request through the various committees and were able to get us the money for the park,” says Johnson.

“We’ll try again for some other projects (including the theater) next year, but, considering the COVID situation and the flag situation and all that the legislature was having to deal with this year, I’m very happy that we received needed help with one of our projects. We hope to work closely with the legislature in getting state investment in Houston in the coming term.”

The improvements at the park, which features an approximately five-acre lake, will include a walking track around the lake, including a new “fishing” bridge over the east bay, solar lighting and some RV hook ups as well as trash receptacles, graded parking and other improvements. According to Johnson, the RV hook ups were a good selling point to the project due to the park’s proximity to the nearby Tanglefoot Trail.

“Our hope is to start on this project in early 2021 and have the space completed in time for the Summer Concert Series, which was postponed this year due to COVID, but is slated

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Homes Under The Hammer star Martin Roberts explains how the stamp holiday duty works

Watch: Property expert, Martin Roberts, explains the new rules surrounding stamp duty and how you can use this initiative to your advantage

In July, Chancellor Rishi Sunak announced a stamp duty holiday for property buyers in the aim of triggering a recovery of the UK economy.

Until 31 March 2021, buyers will pay no stamp duty on the first £500,000 when they move home. The HM Treasury estimated that this will save nearly 9 out of 10 people getting onto or moving up the property ladder money.

It’s a move that Homes Under The Hammer star Martin Roberts says is very positive – and one all home buyers should take advantage of.

“This is a really positive thing,” he says.

“If you’re in the market for buying properties, this is something which you need to act quick on because we don’t know how long this window of opportunity will last for and it does actually save you those pound notes. 

Read more: Martin Roberts shares his top tips on how to move out to the country

“There’s no trick to it. It’s just a window of opportunity designed to stimulate the housing market and hopefully help us all be able to afford our dream home.” 

However, not everyone is as positive as Roberts that the Stamp Duty holiday is a good thing.

Samuel Tombs, chief UK economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, said the impact would be minimal. 

“We do not think that a stamp duty holiday alone would stop house prices falling this year,” he wrote in an investment note. “We currently forecast a 5% peak-to-trough decline in prices.”

During previous recessions when stamp duty was abolished, house sales initially rose but this was followed by a downturn when the holiday ended. It also saw some sellers raising their prices to

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