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Israel Approves First New Settler Homes Since Suspending Annexation, NGO Says | World News

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – Israel approved more than 1,300 new settler homes in the occupied West Bank on Wednesday, the Peace Now settlement-monitoring group said, in the first such go-ahead since it suspended annexation plans in the territory.

The decision drew an angry response from Palestinians, who seek to establish a state in the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem.

“We urge the international community to intervene immediately to stop this settlement madness, which destroys any chance for a genuine peace process,” said Nabil Abu Rudeineh, a spokesman for Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

The construction could help mute criticism of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu from settler leaders, who are traditional allies.

They had bristled at the annexation suspension that helped pave the way for last month’s deals to forge diplomatic ties between Israel and the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain.

Peace Now said a planning committee in Israel’s Civil Administration in the West Bank gave final approval for building 1,357 housing units in several settlements.

A spokesman for the administration could not immediately confirm the numbers.

A statement from Beit El settlement said 350 new housing units would be built there. It hailed the committee’s decision as “a tremendous achievement for Beit El”.

The forum, which last held such a hearing eight months ago, was due to reconvene on Thursday to advance additional construction projects in settlements and give final approval for others.

Peace Now said the committee was set to move forward with projects comprising at least 4,430 new settler homes.

Most countries view settlements Israel has built in territory captured in the 1967 Middle East war as illegal and as an obstacle to peace with the Palestinians. The United States and Israel dispute this.

Israel cites historical and biblical links to the West Bank and around 450,000 of its

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In ‘Leave The World Behind,’ 2 Families Face The Unknown Together

Rumaan Alam’s latest novel, Leave the World Behind, centers on a white family and an older Black couple who find themselves together in a beautiful vacation house on Long Island while a power outage — and possibly something much worse — grips much of the East Coast.

The novel, which is up for the National Book Award, explores class and race relations — and how we respond to crisis and fear. The juxtaposition between the luxury inside the home and the growing sense of uneasiness outside the house seems to speak to life during the pandemic, but Alam says the connection was purely accidental.

“I could not have foreseen the particular cultural moment into which I’m publishing this book,” he says.

Alam, who lives in Brooklyn, felt a particular tension between safety and confinement during the early days of New York City’s COVID-19 shutdown: “I felt really trapped earlier this year when it was March and it was kind of cold outside and the playgrounds weren’t open and there really was nowhere for me and my kids to go. And it’s hard to hold those two things in your head — that you can have the great fortune of having a place to be and still feel a little trapped there.”

That tension runs throughout Leave the World Behind: “There’s a discomfort in that metaphor of the home — the luxurious home that promises to be this family’s getaway — that eventually becomes this family’s trap,” Alam says.


Interview highlights

On the novel’s opening chapters, in which the white family who is renting the house opens the door in the middle of the night to an older Black couple who claim to be the home’s owners

The reader is meant to feel a bit of discomfort there because,

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What Moon Dog World will look like once it reopens

Moon Dog World celebrates its first birthday on October 4 in lockdown, but the team at Moon Dog have used their creativity to bring the playful pub experience to us at home. 

While we can’t laze by the bright blue lagoon with an ice-cold pot of Lagoona Matata Sour Ale in hand, we can instead opt to enjoy a series of their beers at home. Play bartender with your housemate, pop one of Moon Dog’s bar mats onto your dining table and crack open a variety of their tinnies which come in the Pub in a Box.

Complete the experience with some of Moon Dog’s “drinking food” and order pork or tofu bao, buttermilk fried chicken ribs, buffalo cauliflower, a chicken or eggplant parma and crinkle-cut chips via Mr Yum.

“One of the biggest things that our team came up with was the Spring Box, and that comes with some fantastic beers and you get a planter,” says Karl van Buuren, co-founder of Moon Dog. The Moon Dog Spring Box comes with a range of 15 limited and core release beers and a DIY Kokedame Kit from Leaf and Bear, which is otherwise known as the ‘poor man’s bonsai’.

“Our team has been working hard to keep everything running and the ideas flowing,” he says. “Since day one our thing has been to always have a bit of fun and make our products accessible and inclusive. It’s to expand people’s ideas of what beer is and gives them an excuse to try something new. 

“In the midst of a pandemic and lockdown, that kind of attitude is more important than ever. When you’re looking at things that are doom and gloom, having a message from a local business and a company like us is all about fun and keeping that

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The most expensive homes for sale in the world



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article


There’s a vast formal drawing and dining room, complete with French doors leading out onto a landscaped garden and a sunken courtyard – the perfect place for entertaining. There’s also an office, a cloakroom and a family kitchen with high-end Gaggenau

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Iowa Manufactured Homes Stand Up to ‘Inland Hurricane’ | Nation & World

DES MOINES and CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa, Sept. 29, 2020 (SEND2PRESS NEWSWIRE) — One thing Iowans are familiar with is wild weather, says the Iowa Manufactured Homes Association (IMHA). Positioned in the heart of the Midwest, Iowa’s weather ranges from extreme cold and snow to temperatures in the triple digits. And let’s not forget tornadoes. Iowans see virtually everything mother nature can throw, but on August 10, 2020, the state was in for a record-setting weather incident.

What has been compared to an “Inland Hurricane,” a ferocious storm called a derecho swept across the state with winds equal to a Category 2 hurricane, taking down 100-year-old oak trees, stripping homes of roofs, destroying business complexes and more. But through it all, Iowa’s manufactured homes, generally perceived an easy target for wind and storm damage, stood up to the derecho.

“We’re blessed to say the least,” said Troy Hames, General Manager and VP of Sales for Hames Homes. “But, honestly, we’re not surprised.”

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where Hames manages three manufactured home developments totaling over 900 units, seemed to suffer the worst from Iowa’s derecho. Striking an area with a population of just over 130,000, the damage was overwhelming. Businesses saw structural damage to buildings and signage. Parks and rural areas lost up to 80% of their trees, and thousands of acres of crops will need to be plowed under. Residential areas seemed to fare the worst. Over a month later, many residents are still cleaning up fallen trees and thrown debris. But Hames’ communities, along with other manufactured home communities throughout the state, saw comparatively little damage.

While common perceptions of manufactured homes would lead one to think hurricane force winds would be catastrophic, reality and the recent derecho proved otherwise. Out of Hames’ 900+ units, only three (3) were damaged

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