Worst

Watch Jasmine Roth Tackle the ‘Worst Bathroom Situation’ Ever

HGTV star Jasmine Roth has helped many homeowners fix their DIY fails, but in the latest episode of “Help! I Wrecked My House,” she encounters a bathroom that may be beyond repair.

In the episode “Behind the Tarp,” Roth meets Andrea and Jeremy, homeowners in Anaheim, CA, who started a bathroom renovation—only to leave the space in ruin. The floor is gone, the walls are gone, and there’s even a hole in the ground.

Now, Roth has a $60,000 budget to create a stunning bathroom from scratch. Read on to learn how Roth turns the worst bathroom into an oasis, and see some upgrades you might be inspired to try in your own home.

bathroom
Jasmine Roth plans out her bathroom design.

HGTV

Make sure your bathroom tiles don’t compete

floor
Before: This DIY bathroom project was a disaster.

HGTV

Roth wants to make sure Jeremy and Andrea’s bathroom is extra special, so she decides to give them the convenience of both a shower and bath in a wet room. But to make this wet room work, she knows she’ll need the right tile design.

Roth picks a gorgeous slate tile to go on the floor and reach up the wall, then chooses a plain white subway tile for the rest of the space. However, when it comes time to install the subway tile, it’s set in a staggered pattern that Roth realizes could compete with the herringbone pattern nearby.

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This tile combination makes the bathroom look chic.

HGTV

“The herringbone is the ‘wow’ factor,” Roth says. “That floor, that slate, that’s going to have that beautiful pattern. That’s where I want the pattern to be, not with this white tile.”

She has the tile redone, this time in a stacked pattern, which gives the walls a cleaner look. In the

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London Luxury Homes Suffer Worst Rental Slump in Over a Decade

(Bloomberg) — It’s a pretty good time to be renting a posh London pad.

The price to lease a home in the capital’s wealthiest areas slumped by an annual 8.1% in September, the steepest in more than 10 years, according to broker Knight Frank. Landlords are flooding the market with short-term rentals as tourists stay away from the capital, and more owners are opting to rent out properties amid the pandemic uncertainty.

The pain for owners in London’s priciest districts will likely continue into the current quarter, with Knight Frank forecasting a 9% decline for the whole year. Step outside the capital, though, and it’s a different story: nationwide rents are going in the other direction as renters search for homes with more space and larger gardens.



chart, histogram: London's Falling


© Bloomberg
London’s Falling

Rents also slipped as international students snubbed high-end properties in central London, the report said. Less interest from corporate clients also contributed, as the resurgent virus keeps white-collar workers at home.

There’s a bit of good news for central city landlords. Knight Frank sees prices starting to recover in 2021, as knock-down prices bring tenants back to the capital.

Read more: Manhattan Apartments Haven’t Been This Cheap to Rent Since 2013

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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How to Avoid the 5 Worst Kitchen Design Mistakes

ALL-WHITE kitchens that look like operating theaters aren’t all that inspiring or even practical. But the overcooked alternatives—kitchens featuring grease-accumulating ceramic roosters or cabinetry festooned with grape-leaf swags—can seem depressingly cluttered. “It’s a place for creating meals, not Versailles,” said New York architect Kevin Lichten.

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Homeowners should view their kitchens first as machines for preparing food, he advised. “Then slowly add luxury to make it sensually appealing”—and ideally inject personality of the right kind. We asked design pros like Mr. Lichten to share their biggest kitchen-decorating pet peeves, from oversize islands to mixed-material counters, and to recommend chic, functional fixes.

HANG ‘EM HIGH In a kitchen in Oklahoma City, Okla., the upper cabinets continue to the ceiling, avoiding a common design error: a dust-collecting gap between the top of the millwork and the ceiling.



Photo:

David Tsay

Scattered Appliances

Countertop gear—coffee maker, toaster, blender, air fryer—might be essential to getting your three squares, conceded Los Angeles designer Amy Sklar, “but honestly, they don’t look so hot spread out over every usable surface.”

Instead Gather your gadget diaspora behind an accordion-doored “appliance garage” (think: a built-in bread box for your blender and such). This allows easy access to contraptions while hiding them. To ensure your juicer stays juiced, plan around an electrical outlet. Pullout drawers in lower cabinets, too, can be hidy-holes for lesser-used appliances.

Unintelligent Counters

Along with other dumb 1970s ideas like water beds, renounce tiled work surfaces. New York designer Alan Tanksley calls out their uneven surfaces and unsanitary grout lines. Even perfectly flat tiles installed tightly can pose a challenge, Mr. Tanksley noted. Any individual tile is more susceptible to chips and cracks than unified slabs of natural stone. That said,

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