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A stuffed portobello recipe only food writer Nigel Slater could design

Overview

Nigel Slater is a food writer’s food writer. The prolific British author’s famously brief recipe introductions read like haikus: “Roasted pumpkin. Smooth, silky mash.” “Autumn mushrooms, ribbons of pasta, a breath of aniseed.” “Crisp pastry. Warm banana. The scent of maple syrup.” They remind me of Ruth Reichl’s much-satirized tweets.

He’s a cook’s cook, too, long advocating a seasonal, breezy approach in the kitchen that has endeared him to readers for decades. In Slater’s hands, few recipes seem daunting — and so many seem enticing.

Slater’s latest book is “Greenfeast: Autumn, Winter,” a celebration of simple vegetarian cooking for colder weather — or, as he writes so beautifully, when “our appetite is pricked by the sudden drop in temperature.” This time of year, “more food will come to the table in deep casseroles and pie dishes,” he writes. “I dig out my capacious ladle for a creamed celery root soup as soft as velvet. The temperature of the plates and bowls will change. We want to hold things that warm our hands, a sign of the happiness to come.”

I’ve stuffed plenty of portobello mushrooms in my time and wasn’t necessarily looking for another such recipe, but Slater’s drew me in anyhow. It’s not complicated: You mash chickpeas into a garlicky, lemony, hummus-esque paste, spread it on two upturned mushroom caps, press in more whole chickpeas (and a sprinkling of black and white sesame seeds) and bake. The puree turns silky, and the mushrooms get pleasantly tender, while staying steak-like enough that you need a knife and fork.

The chickpeas fit neatly inside, making this quite possibly the only stuffed portobello mushroom dish I’ve ever had, let alone made, that I’d classify

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Australian writer reveals the strange culture shocks she faced while living in America

An Australian writer who has spent months living in the United States has shared the noticeable differences between the two countries, including how you pay for petrol, use public bathrooms and buy alcohol.

Madolline Gourley, 30, from Brisbane, Queensland, runs an online blog called One Cat At A Time, and prior to the coronavirus lockdown, spent more than two years cat sitting for families in the States.

During those lengthy stays she became acutely aware of the way Americans live their day-to-day lives and how it differs from the Australian lifestyle, from road rules to adding tax to every purchase you make.

So what are the main variances? 

Madolline Gourley runs an online blog called One Cat At A Time , and prior to the coronavirus lockdown, spent more than two years cat sitting for families in the States

Madolline Gourley runs an online blog called One Cat At A Time , and prior to the coronavirus lockdown, spent more than two years cat sitting for families in the States

1. Pay for petrol before filling up 

In Madolline’s experience Australians will always put petrol in the car first before paying at the counter, so the station attendant knows how much gas they’ve taken.  

But in the US customers swipe their EFTPOS card, enter their postcode – also called a ZIP code – and then start to fill the car up.  

‘Or you can walk into the service station and pay cash, but you still have to pay before you can fill up,’ she told FEMAIL.

‘You can also select $50 when doing the EFTPOS transaction, but if your car only takes $33, $25, or $41.90, you only get billed for that. Not the $50. 

‘This confused me a lot to begin with because I was concerned I was being billed for the full amount.’

In Madolline's experience Australians will always put petrol in the car first before paying at the counter, so the station attendant knows how much gas they've taken (stock image)

In Madolline’s experience Australians will always put petrol in the car first before paying at the counter, so the station attendant knows how much gas they’ve

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