WWE

As If Calling Its Wrestlers ‘Independent Contractors’ Wasn’t Enough, WWE Is Now Going to Hijack Their Twitch Accounts

Encouraging wrestlers to develop their own brand and then coming back to say, “Oh hey, sorry, you need to give us your Twitch account now,” just seems wrong. However, that’s exactly what WWE is doing to its wrestlers, who learned this week that the company would be taking over their Twitch accounts in four weeks, according to WrestlingINC.



a man standing in front of a crowd: Seth Rollins celebrates his victory over John Cena at the WWE SummerSlam 2015 at Barclays Center of Brooklyn on August 23, 2015 in New York City.


© Photo: JP Yim (Getty Images)
Seth Rollins celebrates his victory over John Cena at the WWE SummerSlam 2015 at Barclays Center of Brooklyn on August 23, 2015 in New York City.

The Twitch takeover is related to an edict issued by WWE CEO Vince McMahon at the beginning of September. Per WrestlingINC, the edict stated that talent could no longer “engage with outside third parties” and that wrestlers had 30 days to terminate third-party activities. In a letter to wrestlers at that time, McMahon said that some individuals that were engaged with third parties were “using your name and likeness in ways that are detrimental” to the company.

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Wrestlers that did not do as instructed and engaged in “continued violations” would face fines, suspension and termination, McMahon said.

Although it was apparently not immediately clear that the edict would affect wrestlers’ Twitch and YouTube accounts, WWE later said that its talent could maintain accounts on these platforms under their real names, WrestlingINC reported. However, they would still need to inform WWE of these accounts.

This week, wrestlers learned what would happen to their Twitch accounts. In a few short weeks, these accounts will become the property of WWE, which will own them and give talent a percentage of the revenue. This percentage counts against their downside guarantees, or the money they’re guaranteed to make.

In interviews with PWInsider, several wrestlers, speaking anonymously, said that they would now have to

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WWE Is Going to Take Away Its Wrestlers’ Twitch Accounts

Seth Rollins celebrates his victory over John Cena at the WWE SummerSlam 2015 at Barclays Center of Brooklyn on August 23, 2015 in New York City.

Seth Rollins celebrates his victory over John Cena at the WWE SummerSlam 2015 at Barclays Center of Brooklyn on August 23, 2015 in New York City.
Photo: JP Yim (Getty Images)

Encouraging wrestlers to develop their own brand and then coming back to say, “Oh hey, sorry, you need to give us your Twitch account now,” just seems wrong. However, that’s exactly what WWE is doing to its wrestlers, who learned this week that the company would be taking over their Twitch accounts in four weeks, according to WrestlingINC.

The Twitch takeover is related to an edict issued by WWE CEO Vince McMahon at the beginning of September. Per WrestlingINC, the edict stated that talent could no longer “engage with outside third parties” and that wrestlers had 30 days to terminate third-party activities. In a letter to wrestlers at that time, McMahon said that some individuals that were engaged with third parties were “using your name and likeness in ways that are detrimental” to the company.

Wrestlers that did not do as instructed and engaged in “continued violations” would face fines, suspension and termination, McMahon said.

Although it was apparently not immediately clear that the edict would affect wrestlers’ Twitch and YouTube accounts, WWE later said that its talent could maintain accounts on these platforms under their real names, WrestlingINC reported. However, they would still need to inform WWE of these accounts.

This week, wrestlers learned what would happen to their Twitch accounts. In a few short weeks, these accounts will become the property of WWE, which will own them and give talent a percentage of the revenue. This percentage counts against their downside guarantees, or the money they’re guaranteed to make.

In interviews with PWInsider, several wrestlers,

Continue Reading