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Waldorf Astoria Hotel auctions off 80,000 items ahead of renovation in New York

Dubbed the “unofficial palace,” the Waldorf has hosted the likes of Grace Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald and every US president from Herbert Hoover to Barack Obama. Some members of high society even lived at the hotel, including composer Cole Porter and the Duke of Windsor, Edward VIII, with his partner, Wallis Simpson, after he abdicated the British throne.
The Windsor Suite at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in NYC.
But now, the landmark hotel on Park Avenue is auctioning off 80,000 of its most timeless furnishings in preparation for a complete renovation, as part of the Fine Furnishings of the Historic Waldorf Astoria New York auction, according to a news release from Kaminski Auctions, which is hosting the sale.

“Many of the pieces for auction have been a witness to history, and we are excited to see them find new life in the homes of avid collectors,” said Andrew Miller, CEO of Dajia US, the owner and developer of Waldorf Astoria New York.

Anyone can now own classic 19th century French furniture from the Windsor Suite, the Cole Porter Suite, the Winston Churchill Suite and the Presidential Suite, among others. The furnishings include bespoke chandeliers, a Steinway grand piano and Charles X-style benches.

The Presidential Suite at the Waldorf Astorial Hotel in NYC.

Online bidding and personal viewings of the items at Silver City Galleria Mall in Massachusetts, where they’re being held, started Saturday. A two-week live and Covid-safe auction is scheduled to start October 17. The auction is set to end November 15, according to the news release.

All proceeds from the auction will go to the St. Bartholomew’s Conservancy to help restore the exteriors and gardens of St. Bartholomew’s Church and Community House, located across the street from the hotel, according to the news release.

The Waldorf Astoria started the construction in December 2017 as part of a major renovation. The hotel is expected to reopen in two
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Gov. Cuomo falsely claims New York nursing homes ‘never needed’ to take in Covid-positive patients

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo argued that nursing homes “never needed” to accept Covid-positive patients from hospitals in the state.



Andrew Cuomo wearing a suit and tie: NEW YORK, NY - JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)


© Jeenah Moon/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY – JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)

During a press call Wednesday, Finger Lakes News Radio asked Cuomo about his administration’s advisory in late March requiring that nursing homes accept the readmission of patients from hospitals, even if they were positive for Covid-19.

Cuomo argued that the advisory was a precaution if hospitals became overwhelmed — calling it an “anticipatory rule” — which he said didn’t happen.

“We never needed nursing home beds because we always had hospital beds,” Cuomo told Finger Lakes News. “So it just never happened in New York where we needed to say to a nursing home, ‘We need you to take this person even though they’re Covid-positive.’ It never happened.”

Facts First: Cuomo’s assertion that “it never happened” is false. According to a report from the New York State Department of Health, “6,326 COVID-positive residents were admitted to [nursing home] facilities” following Cuomo’s mandate that nursing homes accept the readmission of Covid-positive patients from hospitals. Whether or not this was “needed,” it did in fact happen.

On March 25, the state’s Health Department issued an advisory requiring nursing homes to accept “the expedited receipt of residents returning from hospitals” if the patients were deemed medically stable.

“No resident shall be

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Converting Factories Into Homes – The New York Times

As the pandemic stretches on, office buildings sit empty as their tenants work from home, and brick and-mortar stores continue to lose ground to online shopping. Witness the bankruptcies of major retail giants J.C. Penney and Neiman Marcus, and the pile of Amazon deliveries in your building lobby, as clear evidence.

Some developers are already responding to these changes by converting nonresidential spaces for other uses, including as residences. But this idea isn’t new — just look at Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood, once home to manufacturing and now among the city’s most expensive residential areas, known for lofts converted from factory floors.

A recent study by RENTCafé examined the conversion of commercial and institutional spaces to homes over the past seven decades, and found that they’ve never been more prevalent, with the 2010s posting a record number of such conversions.

The study, which informs this week’s chart, reports that across the U.S. during the 2010s, 96,544 units were created in 778 buildings that were formerly schools, factories, offices or other nonresidential spaces. (The study only considered buildings with 50 or more units.) In the 2000s, 63,989 units in 467 buildings were converted. Back in the 1950s, just 2,002 units in 14 buildings across the country were converted. Not surprisingly, New York topped the list for most residential units, although several cities converted more buildings.

Factories have been the most popular conversion targets, followed by hotels, office buildings, schools and warehouses. An encouraging finding: 42 percent of units created in those repurposed spaces were aimed at middle-income renters, and 23 percent included units within the reach of low-income renters.

This week’s chart shows the cities in which the greatest number of residential units were created from other kinds of buildings in the 2010s, as well the type of building most commonly converted.

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Best Nursing Homes – New York

1 St. Catherine of Siena Nursing & Rehabilitation Center Smithtown 240 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident Council 2 Friendly Senior Living – Friendly Home Rochester 204 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident Council 3 New York Center For Rehabilitation & Nursing Astoria 280 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident Council 4 Queens Boulevard Extended Care Facility Woodside 280 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident and Family Council 5 Elizabeth Seton Children’s Center Yonkers 169 Medicaid Accepted, No Resident and Family Council 6 NYC Health + Hospitals – Sea View Skilled Nursing Facility Staten Island 304 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident and Family Council 7 Northwell Health Stern Family Center for Rehabilitation Manhasset 256 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident Council 8 Episcopal Church Home Rochester 182 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident and Family Council 9 Catholic Health – McAuley Residence Kenmore 160 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident Council 10 The Wartburg Home Mount Vernon 240 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident and Family Council 11 NYC Health + Hospitals – Coler Rehabilitation & Nursing Care Center Roosevelt Island 815 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident and Family Council 12 Forest View Center For Rehabilitation & Nursing Forest Hills 160 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident Council 13 NYC Health + Hospitals – Gouverneur Skilled Nursing Facility New York 295 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident Council 14 The Brothers of Mercy Nursing & Rehabilitation Clarence 240 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident Council 15 Long Island State Veterans Home Stonybrook 350 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident and Family Council 16 ArchCare at Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center New York 679 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident and Family Council 17 Meadowbrook Care Center Freeport 280 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident Council 18 NYC Health + Hospitals – Carter Skilled Nursing Facility Manhattan 1389 Medicare Accepted, Medicaid Accepted, Resident and
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$850,000 Homes in Maryland, New Mexico and New York

This stucco-and-stone-clad house is in Baltimore County, a few blocks north of the Baltimore city line, which puts it within easy distance of downtown workplaces and cultural activities (the National Aquarium, for instance, is 20 away minutes in light traffic), yet means it is subject to the county’s lower tax rate.

It is in the Pinehurst neighborhood, where most houses date from the 1920s to the 1940s, the streets have leafy canopies and the median sale price is about $660,000. Hunt Valley, a business and shopping hub, is about 11 miles north. The sellers have owned the property for 27 years and have made a number of structural interventions. They dug out the basement to increase its height and built a detached garage with a copper roof that stylistically echoes the slate roof on the main house. They also raised the ceiling of a bedroom addition to give it more period character.

Size: 3,868 square feet

Price per square foot: $213

Indoors: The front door leads into a foyer with plaster walls and hardwood floors, which continue throughout the house’s original portion. To the left is a living room with a wood-burning fireplace surrounded in brick and topped with a white-painted mantel. A screened porch with fieldstone flooring and a plank ceiling is off to the side.

Straight ahead of the front door is a formal dining room with a cutaway entrance that brings in additional light. The casement windows have been upgraded to double-pane, but retain a period style, and a swinging door leads into a hallway off the eat-in kitchen. The kitchen is wrapped in cherry-wood cabinets with Corian

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