Attingal palace complex set for renovation- The New Indian Express

By Express News Service

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: The Attingal palace complex, an iconic monument that stood witness to the first homegrown revolt in Kerala against the British Empire, is finally set for renovation. According to B Satyan MLA, the government has sanctioned Rs 1.6 crore for renovating the complex to its past glory. Besides renovating the structure, a memorial of Attingal revolt will also be built, he said. 

The State Archaeology Department has prepared a masterplan for the refurbishment. “The procedures following the administrative sanction are being completed fast. Work will start as early as possible. A history museum is also planned,” he said. The state budget had earmarked Rs 3 crore for the palace renovation.       

The palace situated around 33 km from the capital city was a mute witness to the Attingal revolt in 1721.
Several structures in the sprawling palace complex are in a dilapidated condition. They include the padippura, the main entrance, nadapanthal, oottupura, kothalam and a nalukettu. Renovation and replacement of the structures built in stone, wood and tiles would be a challenging task for archeology department. 

The Attingal revolt was triggered by the malpractice of the British traders who camped at Anchuthengu under the captaincy of General Gyford. It was one of the early rebellions against the British colonial rule in the country.  The protest triggered over the British traders’ unilateral decision on the pricing of black pepper. 

On a night in 1721, a British team which headed to the palace to present the queen with annual gifts, was attacked by the locals led by the local landlords belonging to Ettuveettil Pillai family. killing 133 Britishers. 

The Anchuthengu Fort came under the control of local people for six months until they were defeated by troops which arrived from Thalassery. However, the queen of Attingal later entered into a peace treaty with the British. 

Daunting task ahead
The palace was a mute witness to the Attingal revolt in 1721. Several structures in the sprawling palace complex are in a dilapidated condition.  They include the padippura, the main entrance, nadapanthal, oottupura, kothalam and a nalukettu. Renovation and replacement of the structures built in stone, wood and tiles would be a challenging task for archeology department. 

Source Article