Home Remodeling

Fraternity members, volunteers remodel late officer’s home

NEW ALBANY, Ind. (AP) — Starr Pavey said her heart has been broken since her husband, Bill, died in June, but a wide smile appeared across her face as she spoke about his personality and gregarious nature.

Bill was a jokester who made everyone smile, even while he was battling cancer for the last five years of his life, Starr said.

“We laughed all of the time until the last month or so. He said it hurt him to laugh,” Starr said of her late husband.


Bill Pavey was well-known throughout southern Indiana for his service to the community. He worked for the New Albany-Floyd County Parks Department for over eight years as a park ranger before serving as a New Albany police officer for two decades.

It was the day of his death, June 3, when Starr said a friend who was at her house mentioned smelling gas. A few days later, she also noticed the smell, and upon further inspection, a serious gas leak was discovered under her home along with about five feet of standing water.



“It’s just been overwhelming stress since before he died. It’s been one nightmare after the other,” Starr said.

She knew some work was needed on the New Albany house, but said Bill didn’t want any interruptions during their last few months together.


But the impact Bill Pavey had on others during his life has been exemplified by what others have been willing to do in his honor after his death.

Pavey was one of the founding fathers of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity at Indiana University Southeast. Over 40 years later, his fraternity brothers are in the midst of an extensive rehabilitation project of his house.


Mark Kruer and Mark Lawrence are co-coordinators of the effort, but it’s been a team

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Home remodels are booming in Santa Fe | Local News

The perfect storm of home renovations is upon us.

So many people are spending so much time at home these days that a dwelling’s imperfections become that much more apparent.

Against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic and a home sales boom in which buyers are willing to invest in long-term changes once they get the keys, Santa Fe remodeling companies are booked solid with orders.

“It’s in hyperdrive right now,” said Steve Pompei, owner of Pompei’s Home Remodeling in Santa Fe. “I am stacking jobs into next summer. My lead time is usually two to three months.”

Remodeling in Santa Fe boomed during the last recession a dozen years ago, an outgrowth of what then was a home-sales bust. Many of those builders-turned-remodelers remain in the game and say they find themselves with plenty of work in the COVID age.

“The only thing that has happened in COVID is the phone is ringing more,” said Douglas Maahs, owner of DMC, a Santa Fe-based remodeler. “More people are looking for remodel than before. People have been at home and decide, ‘We are stuck here, let’s do something.’ ”

Santa Fe resident Miles D. Conway left on a three-day trip with his son, Tilman, to look at colleges, and when they came home, his wife, Mikahla Beutler, had that grin.

“ ‘Look, no carpeting. We are remodeling the upstairs,’ ” Conway recounted, noting he was unaware that the pending remodel would start during his short absence. “It went from just putting in flooring and turned into a full upstairs remodel.”

Boni Armijo, owner of Building Adventures Unlimited in Santa Fe, had a steady diet of remodels and additions from homebuyers from Dallas, Houston and Manhattan, N.Y., until the pandemic started.

“What has changed is the clientele we are getting,” Armijo said.

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Home Improvement: How to recognize when you can stop mowing – Salisbury Post

Each weekend in spring, summer and fall, millions of homeowners fire up their mowers and cut the grass in their yards. A few hours spent mowing the lawn can be a great time to get some sun and some exercise in the great outdoors. As fall gradually transitions to winter, homeowners may wonder when to stop mowing their lawns. Each lawn is different, and when to stop mowing may depend on a host of factors, including local climate and the type of turf. In addition to climate and turf, homeowners can keep an eye on these conditions to determine when the time is right to put their mowers away for the winter.

• Frost: Warm-season grasses typically go dormant after a couple of significant frosts. Homeowners can jot down each frost during fall. Frosts are most noticeable in the early morning hours, so be sure to check lawn conditions each morning as the weather begins to grow cold. Frost may be noticeable without even going outside, but homeowners may need to go outside to check on chilly mornings or on days when the previous night was especially cold. If you must go outside, stay off the grass to protect it. Two or three frosts might be enough to make warm-season grasses go dormant for the winter. Cool-season grasses may keep growing and require moving even after a few frosts, so it’s imperative that homeowners determine which type of grass is in their yards.

• Soil temperature: If it’s hard to determine if frosts have occurred, homeowners can try checking the temperature of their soil to decide if they need to keep mowing. The lawn care experts at Pennington recommend homeowners continue mowing warm-season grasses so long as they keep growing. Lawns may not grow as quickly in fall as they

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Tulsa home remodeling company hiring crew members amid pandemic

TULSA, Okla. — Unemployment in Oklahoma decreases each week, but about 80,000 people are still without a job.

2 Works for You is highlighting a company that started small 42 years ago doing siding and windows. Now, as demand grew due to the coronavirus pandemic, business is booming.

Burnett Home Improvement said they used to make a few hundred thousand dollars a year, but hit company records this summer. Last month, they made nearly $700,000. They said the increase is because people are at home, restless, with no places to vacation.

So they’ve seen people spending extra funds on remodeling their home.

Vice President Shawn Donahue has been with the company for almost two years and wants to encourage people to apply. Their faith-based company prides itself on treatment and fairness.

Burnett Home Improvement employee Vasilik Napelenok said, “Most of the people are Christian here, so I think that’s really what matters to me. I know these people are not going to lie, they are going to be honest… that’s one of the best things about working here.”

Donahue’s main job is to make sure the company’s crew members stay happy because they wouldn’t have the business or reputation they have today without them.

“If anybody is willing to learn, we are always willing to give them a shot. We always want to do our best by people, we want to give everyone the opportunity to succeed, whether that be here, or somewhere else,” Donahue said.

Donahue said anybody looking for work should apply.

To apply, call this number (918) 215-8897, or go to their website for more information.

CLICK HERE to find out “Who’s Hiring in Green Country?”

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Urban flight means home improvement trends will become a sustained shift

People walk into a house for sale in Floral Park, Nassau County, New York, the United States, on Sept. 6, 2020. Home buyers eying for cozy backyards and more office space are staging bidding wars in the suburbs surrounding New York City amid the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Wang Ying | Xinhua News Agency | Getty Images

As some Americans flee cities and move into suburban or rural areas during the coronavirus pandemic, some analysts are predicting home projects and repairs will shift from a trend to long-term habit.

That could add up to more sales for Home Depot, Lowe’s and other retailers with a wide variety of home improvement items, from paint and tools to kitchen appliances, according to a Wells Fargo Securities research note. Those retailers have already seen strong sales and growing profits during the pandemic, as Americans spend more time in their homes and dollars they would have otherwise doled out for restaurant bills or summer vacations.

The suburban shift could also benefit auto-focused retailers, such as Carvana, AutoZone, O’Reilly Automotive and Advance Auto Parts, according to the note.

In the research note, Wells Fargo senior equity analyst Zachary Fadem spelled out factors that have driven some people out of cities. Among them, he said, about 65% of early Covid-19 cases were concentrated in dense cities. People have sought out more space as they work and learn at home and as aspects of city life from public transit to high-end restaurants are unavailable or unappealing.

He pointed to recent earnings reports by retailers that soared past Wall Street expectations, citing de-urbanization as one of the causes.

A survey of about 1,000 consumers by the Wells Fargo analysts found that more than 88% planned to increase their retail spending in the second half of the year

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