Renovation

Love III architect behind First Tee Belmont renovation

RICHMOND, Va. (WWBT) – When it re-opens, Belmont Golf Course will be unlike any golf facility one has visited. That’s according to former PGA Tour major champion Davis Love III.



a group of people standing next to a woman at a park: Davis Love III is the architect behind the renovations at Belmont Golf Course.


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Davis Love III is the architect behind the renovations at Belmont Golf Course.

Love is the architect leading the renovations at Belmont, now owned by First Tee-Greater Richmond. He and his brother, Mark, co-founded Love Golf Design in 1994 and have blueprinted several courses in the southeast. Now he’s restoring and renovating one of Virginia’s historical golf markers for a cause he fully supports.

“I was on the board of the PGA Tour when the First Tee was created,” Love III said on Tuesday. “I’ve watched it grow from its infancy and it’s a big part of what we do in our tournament.”

First Tee’s mission is to impact the lives of young people by providing educational programs that build character, instill life-enhancing values and promote healthy choices through the game of golf. First Tee-Greater Richmond reached more than 71,000 youth in 2019.

Love says that he’s been a part of a lot of First Tee projects, but nothing like the $5 million renovation that Belmont is currently undergoing. The course was designed by famous architect A.W. Tillinghast in 1917 and Love would like to keep some of those characteristics. The venue hosted the PGA Championship in 1949, won by Sam Snead, and it remains the only course in Virginia to host a PGA Tour major championship.

“We’re glad to not only give the kids an opportunity of a great place to play, but bring this golf course back to what it was,” Love said.

Once complete, Belmont will be state of the art, featuring a 12-hole championship caliber course, a six hole short course,

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Renovation of Holmes Theatre lobby to cost $332,000

Bids on the project were opened Tuesday, Oct. 13, with the contract going to the low bidder, T.F. Powers Construction of Fargo, at an overall cost of $342,700. The bid package included a base bid of $331,900, plus one $10,800 alternate for additional brick work that may or may not be necessary once an interior wall covering is removed.

The renovations are slated to begin Monday, Oct. 19. The bulk of the project will be funded through a $290,000 CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act grant from Becker County, which was approved last month. The terms of the federally-funded grant require that the project be directly related to COVID-19 safety improvements, and that the funds must be used up no later than Dec. 1.

Though some renovation of the theater lobby was always going to be needed to accommodate construction of the new, adjacent county museum, recent changes to theater operations required under state-mandated pandemic safety regulations necessitated a considerable expansion to those plans.

“Social distancing requires people to be able to spread out more when entering and exiting the theater,” explained Holmes Theatre Executive Director Amy Stoller Stearns, noting that the theater’s current layout is a bit cramped for accommodating those requirements.

For this reason, the boards of the Becker County Historical Society (which operates the museum) and the Detroit Lakes Community & Cultural Center (the theater is part of the overall DLCCC complex) decided to apply for a $290,000 CARES grant from the county to assist with funding the project. The county board approved the application last month.

New plans were drawn up by the project’s main architects, YHR Partners, and the bid opening set for Tuesday afternoon at the museum’s current home on Summit Avenue (across the parking lot from the theater). Construction of the

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Davis Love III drops by to see ongoing Belmont Golf Course renovation project | Golf

The renovation will also include a putting course just under an acre in size, a driving range and a putting green.

After Belmont was opened in 1916, it was renovated by Donald Ross in 1927.

But the current renovation is restoring portions of the course back to the way it first was. Nine of the 12 holes on the main course will have original greens.

Other holes, on the six-hole short course, draw influences from other Tillinghast courses, like San Francisco Golf Club.

“It’s just, trying to bring the history back,” Love said.

Belmont isn’t short on history, as the only course in Virginia to host a PGA major: the 1949 PGA Championship, won by Sam Snead. Ben Hogan also won the Richmond Invitational there, four years earlier.

But space was one of the reasons First Tee and Love Golf Design opted to split the course into a 12-hole circuit and a six-hole short course, instead of leaving it at 18 holes. The facility lacked amenities like an area to practice, which First Tee needs for its youth programs.

So the spot was divided a bit.

“This was an 18-hole golf course with no practice facility,” said Brent Schneider, CEO of The First Tee of Greater Richmond. “And so we knew in its original state it wasn’t going to work. But we also really appreciated the history.”

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James Hardie raises 2021 profit forecast on high demand for renovation

Adds details on markets, 2021 forecast

Oct 14 (Reuters)Australian building materials supplier James Hardie Industries JHX.AX on Wednesday raised its full-year profit forecast and said it expected to post record second-quarter results, boosted by solid demand for its services across markets.

Since the COVID-19 pandemic related shutdowns hammered sales earlier in the year, there has been a recovery in Asia Pacific and European markets.

James Hardie, the world’s biggest fibre cement maker, said the all-time high quarterly sales were “made possible by having all three operating regions deliver growth above market.”

In August, it said sales in North America, one of its biggest markets, were buyoed by homeowners turning to renovation amid the pandemic.

The company increased its fiscal 2021 forecast for underlying net operating profit after tax (NOPAT) to between $380 million and $420 million, from an earlier projection of $330 million and $390 million.

It will report its second quarter results on Nov. 10.

(Reporting by Anushka Trivedi and Nikhil Kurian Nainan in Bengaluru; Editing by Chris Reese and Shinjini Ganguli)

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Marcella’s Clearance Center in Schenectady, planned for renovations, damaged in Tuesday fire; Owner responds

Categories: -The Daily Gazette, Business, News, Schenectady County

SCHENECTADY — Not even three weeks after announcing plans to renovate his Crane Street appliance store, John D. Marcella is trying to figure out if the building is salvageable after a fire broke out there Tuesday morning.

The fire was called in at the 810 Crane St. building at around 8 a.m. Tuesday. The initial cause is believed to be water seeping into a light fixture, Marcella said.

The century-old building serves as a clearance outlet and a warehouse for the larger headquarters of Marcella’s Appliance Center down the hill on Broadway, as well as a smaller Clifton Park retail location.

In late September, Marcella’s announced it would renovate the façade and other parts of the Crane Street building. The Schenectady County Metroplex Development Authority announced it would provide a $50,000 façade grant for the project, which it said would boost the ongoing city-county effort to revitalize the Crane Street corridor.

As a first step, Marcella said, he had the roof partly replaced over the last two weeks at a cost of more than $40,000.

The first employees arrived at the location around 7 a.m. Tuesday, he said. They smelled something odd inside but couldn’t track down its source.

The origin became very apparent an hour later, when flames erupted through the roof, Marcella said.

The workers escaped harm. The building did not. Firefighters got the blaze out in about an hour, officials said. One firefighter suffered minor injuries, officials said, but no other injuries were reported.

“What a mess,” Marcella sighed Tuesday afternoon. “I don’t believe it’s restorable right now. … All the walls are shot and all the electric is shot.”

Beyond that, 150 new appliances were damaged.

The engineering and architectural plans for parts of the project were completed

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