Air

City Hall Notebook: Timeline for DCU Center improvements up in the air – News – telegram.com

When the city hit the pause button back in the early spring on the planned Phase 2 master plan improvements for the DCU Center because of funding uncertainty resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, it was hoped it could be restarted in January.

Of course, no one back then foresaw that the city-owned DCU Center would remain closed seven months later. It is now expected to remain dark at least through the end of this year.

As a result, the possibility of a January restart for the project seems very much up in the air.

John Odell, the city’s director of energy and assets, told the Civic Center Commission last week that the restart will be determined when the revenue stream for it can support the work.

And with uncertainty about just when the DCU Center will be able to host events again, that makes the timeline for the project quite uncertain itself.

The Civic Center Commission has approved improvements for the DCU Center totaling $21.5 million. They are broken down into five priority areas: life safety and code compliance, deferred maintenance, public accommodations, revenue enhancements, and other enhancements/upgrades.

To finance building improvements, the city created a special DCU Finance District in 2006 that consisted of four parcels: the Hilton Garden Inn, the Residence by Marriott on Plantation Street, the DCU Center arena and convention center, and the Major Taylor Boulevard parking garage, including its retail space and operations.

In 2016 the district was expanded to include additional parcels.

Certain tax revenues generated in that district and collected by the state — hotel, meals and sales taxes — are redirected back to the city to finance the bonds for improvements in and around the DCU Center.

But when the COVID-19 pandemic forced the closing of the DCU Center in mid-March and

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MPS Building Report Details Air Quality Improvements, Challenges

MEDFORD, MA — A report compiled late last month and released by the Medford Public Schools Friday shows the improvements done to the HVAC systems in school buildings, as well as some of the air quality challenges the district faced. Workers were onsite last week addressing what the district called “long overdue” repairs to the HVAC systems at its schools. There were enough areas within each school that met, or exceeded, the increased air quality standards to accommodate the return of high needs and kindergarten students.

The MPS report specifically pertained to Cohort A, or the district’s high-needs student population. The district measured air exchanges per hour (ACH) and deemed rooms underneath that threshold unfavorable.

Medford High School

Data showed favorable air quality in the third floor of the B building, or the science labs wing, which was extensively renovated over the last several years. Students in Cohort A, who would ordinarily have been located elsewhere, were temporarily relocated to that area.

Three rooms were temporarily closed:

  • Lecture Hall 2 (1.67 ACH)
  • Room 314 (3.82 ACH) (in proximity to other rooms but not currently passing, HVAC vendors are inspecting)
  • A206 Mock apartment room (2.76 ACH)

Testing is ongoing at Medford High School.

Curtis Tufts High School

CTHS does not have an HVAC system and is an outlier among the air quality reports. The actual ACH noted in the report is 0.0 as the only method of circulating fresh air possible at

CTHS is through open windows. Windows in each CTHS classroom have been opened (with new screens installed in the last several weeks).

In addition, on the advice of the engineering experts, two fans have been installed in each classroom, which are pointed both in and out of separate windows. This method of air circulation is estimated to create an

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Battle Creek Air Guard Base completes $5.1M renovation to support cyber and air operations

A $5.14 million renovation project is complete at the Battle Creek Air National Guard Base.



a group of people standing in front of a brick building: Lt. Col. Terry Brennen, 217th Air Component Operations Squadron commander, from right to left, Col. Shawn Holtz, 110th Wing commander, Brig. Gen. Bryan Teff, Michigan Air National Guard commander, and Lt. Col. Daniel Guy, 110th Wing Mission Support Group commander cut the ribbon on a newly renovated building at the 110th Wing, Battle Creek Air National Guard Base, Battle Creek, Michigan, Oct. 2, 2020. The newly renovated building will house operations for the 272nd Cyber Operations Squadron and the 217th Air Component Operations Squadron.


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Lt. Col. Terry Brennen, 217th Air Component Operations Squadron commander, from right to left, Col. Shawn Holtz, 110th Wing commander, Brig. Gen. Bryan Teff, Michigan Air National Guard commander, and Lt. Col. Daniel Guy, 110th Wing Mission Support Group commander cut the ribbon on a newly renovated building at the 110th Wing, Battle Creek Air National Guard Base, Battle Creek, Michigan, Oct. 2, 2020. The newly renovated building will house operations for the 272nd Cyber Operations Squadron and the 217th Air Component Operations Squadron.

State Sen. John Bizon and ranking members of the Michigan Air National Guard held a ceremony Friday to open facilities for cyber and air operations support in Africa and Europe.

The renovations in the 22,789-square-foot building on the base will house the 272 Cyber Operations Squadron and the 217 Air Component Operations Squadron.

Formation of the cyber squadron was announced in 2015, one of 12 air guard installations in the country which will detect and protect the Department of Defense against electronic attacks. The unit was activated in January 2018 and employs 70 people.

The base has about 1,000 employees.

“Our primary role will be in support of the Department of Defense and statewide,” Col. Bryan Teff, then base commander, said five years ago. “Right now we experience millions of cyber attacks each day against the Department of Defense. We will defend networks and infrastructure when it comes to cyber communications. We will be focusing on the defense of that.”

No a Brigadier General and commander of the Michigan Air National Guard, Teff was present for the ceremony and said the renovation of the building will provide the men and women assigned to the squadrons to “fully execute

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Battle Creek Air Guard Base completes $5.1M renovation

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A $5.14 million renovation project is complete at the Battle Creek Air National Guard Base.

State Sen. John Bizon and ranking members of the Michigan Air National Guard held a ceremony Friday to open facilities for cyber and air operations support in Africa and Europe.

The renovations in the 22,789-square-foot building on the base will house the 272 Cyber Operations Squadron and the 217 Air Component Operations Squadron.

Formation of the cyber squadron was announced in 2015, one of 12 air guard installations in the country which will detect and protect the Department of Defense against electronic attacks. The unit was activated in January 2018 and employs 70 people.

The base has about 1,000 employees.

“Our primary role will be in support of the Department of Defense and statewide,” Col. Bryan Teff, then base commander, said five years ago. “Right now we experience millions of cyber attacks each day against the Department of Defense. We will defend networks and infrastructure when it comes to cyber communications. We will be focusing on the defense of that.”

No a Brigadier General and commander of the Michigan Air National Guard, Teff was present for the ceremony and said the renovation of the building will provide the men and women assigned to the squadrons to “fully execute

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What You Didn’t Know About Air Conditioning Contractors

Although most people just assume that H.V.A.C contractors are a part of the central heat and air contractors that install both furnaces for heating and air con units for cooling, air conditioning contractors have a private history that began in the 1900s when machines for building heating and cooling units began to be established. H.V.A.C contractors became a separate part of the heating and cooling industry in 1946 and were represented by their own groups exclusively concerned with H.V.A.C.

In 1968, H.V.A.C contractors and air conditioning manufacturers joined to form the Air Conditioning & Contractors Institute. The A.R.I is concerned solely with manuals and technology or technologies that are exclusively the province of cooling or air conditioning units.

Another group formed from this endeavour to try to join heating and cooling contractors and manufacturers into one group. The merged group of heating and cooling contractors was called the National Environmental Systems Contractors Association which was later changed back to Air Conditioning Contractors of America although purportedly still representing H.V.A.C contractors in America. Obviously, the choice of names to identify themselves as heating and cooling contractors has been an ongoing issue since 1927 if not earlier when an earlier organization The National Warm Air Heating and Ventilating Association was putting out pamphlets discussing their products and services. Seemingly, air conditioning does not refer exclusively to cooling of air, it can be any artificially contrived method of maintaining the temperature of any given environment through the use of air con units.

If a contractor wants to become an H.V.A.C contractor, he will have to know not only about the various methods and products that are available in his profession; but, he will also have to know how to read the fine print involved with insurance policies and trade agreements and other information …

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