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‘Cheer’ star Jerry Harris assaulted 15-year-old in public bathroom, feds allege

Federal prosecutors say “Cheer” star Jerry Harris has “exploited and violated” at least 10 boys, “exhibits all the signs of a serial child predator” and should stay behind bars.

They also allege that Harris sexually assaulted a 15-year-old boy in an unlocked public bathroom at a cheer event “with other individuals coming and going” — suggesting either that he “wanted to be caught or he simply cannot control his impulses.”

The claims appear in a nine-page memo filed Tuesday ahead of a detention hearing for Harris, who was arrested by the FBI nearly a month ago and charged with production of child pornography. The memo also alleges Harris destroyed his cellphone upon learning of the investigation — and then continued to “victimize minor boys” with a new one.

Harris, 21, is being held at the downtown Metropolitan Correctional Center, prison records show.

Though the original criminal complaint filed against Harris alleged he had admitted having anal and oral sex with a 15-year-old at a cheer event last year, Tuesday’s memo from Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Parente adds new detail and says law enforcement has interviewed the victim. It also hints that more criminal charges could be filed against Harris.

Last month’s complaint also alleged the Netflix docuseries star tried to persuade another minor to engage in oral sex with him at cheerleading events, solicited a third minor for sex, and sought and received child pornography on Snapchat from 10 to 15 others he knew were underage.

Harris is scheduled to appear for a detention hearing Wednesday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Heather McShain. Parente’s memo suggests Harris’ legal team will be proposing Harris be monitored by multiple third-party custodians cycling in and out of his home. Harris’ lawyer Todd Pugh did not immediately respond to messages seeking comment, though.

Parente wrote

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Contractors association allege irregularities in NMC’s accounts dept | Nagpur News

Nagpur: Large-scale irregularities have surfaced in Nagpur Municipal Corporation regarding clearance of outstanding bills of the civil contractors. Though bills were pending from February to October, the accounts department, which has no full-time chief accounts and finance officer, has cleared some bills of April out of bills pending for eight months.
The NMC Contractors’ Welfare Association has approached municipal commissioner Radhakrishnan B and urged him to resolve the issue. “Quite often the in-charge CAFO comes to office in an inebriated condition and uses foul language,” the memorandum stated.
“CAFO Hemant Thakre takes a lot of time to sign the bills and clear payments as per journal voucher sequence despite lots of requests and complaints,” the association alleged.
Thakre refuted the allegation and claimed that he was doing his level best with holding the charge of both Amravati and Nagpur Municipal Corporations. “Since joining I have cleared around 4,000 pending bills and brought them to 1,000-900 files,” he claimed.
According to them, the previous CAFO had cleared files of January this year, while dues of contractors were pending since October 2019. “But from February to October so far, only bills for April were cleated out of these eight months bills, while the CAFO reportedly sent back the bills of last financial year to auditors,” they alleged.
“In all, there must be around 800 to 1,000 files which are pending idle. Not only contractors, corporators and engineers but the whole city is facing hardship as unfinished works cannot be done without measurement books and file also other formalities like extension of time limit, extra items etc are held up,” the memorandum stated.
“He has signed the bills of those who meet him alone in his ante chamber and also clears the bills out of turn of journal voucher sequence which has agitated
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Google contractors allege company prevents them from whistleblowing, writing Silicon Valley novels

  • A California appeals court recently discussed an employee lawsuit against Google and staffing firm Adecco, stating their non-disclosure agreements are too wide-ranging.
  • The workers allege they can’t do things like report violations of the law, or even more menial things like write a novel about working in Silicon Valley.
  • The appeals filing comes as Google faces mounting challenges related to its workforce.



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Google contract employees are alleging the company’s confidentiality agreements prevent them from a range of legal rights from whistleblowing to telling their parents how much they make, according to a recent court filing.

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A California appeals court recently discussed a lawsuit accusing Alphabet’s Google and one of its staffing firms, Adecco, of violating a number of California labor laws, including free speech, by requiring workers to sign extensive confidentiality agreements.

The contractors state they can’t talk about their wages, working conditions or colleagues, among other things, according to the court filing. 

“As a practical matter, plaintiffs argue, they are forbidden even to write a novel about working in Silicon Valley or to reassure their parents they are making enough money to pay their bills, matters untethered to any legitimate need for confidentiality,” the filing states.

Google and Adecco did not immediately return requests for comment.

Google faces a number of challenges related to its workforce, in addition to external antitrust scrutiny. The company this week reached a $310 million settlement in a sexual misconduct lawsuit, which included more than 80 updates to internal policies. That settlement included ending forced arbitration for its workforce and updating non-disclosure agreements to allow full-time workers to discuss facts of cases related to harassment or discrimination,. But it did not definitively cover vendors — instead, the settlement said Google would “encourage” its vendors to revisit their NDA

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Google contractors allege NDAs violate free-speech laws

Carsten Koall | Getty Images

Google contract employees are alleging the company’s confidentiality agreements prevent them from a range of legal rights from whistleblowing to telling their parents how much they make, according to a recent court filing.

A California appeals court recently discussed a lawsuit accusing Alphabet’s Google and one of its staffing firms, Adecco, of violating a number of California labor laws, including free speech, by requiring workers to sign extensive confidentiality agreements.

The contractors state they can’t talk about their wages, working conditions or colleagues, among other things, according to the court filing. 

“As a practical matter, plaintiffs argue, they are forbidden even to write a novel about working in Silicon Valley or to reassure their parents they are making enough money to pay their bills, matters untethered to any legitimate need for confidentiality,” the filing states.

Google and Adecco did not immediately return requests for comment.

Google faces a number of challenges related to its workforce, in addition to external antitrust scrutiny. The company this week reached a $310 million settlement in a sexual misconduct lawsuit, which included more than 80 updates to internal policies. That settlement included ending forced arbitration for its workforce and updating non-disclosure agreements to allow full-time workers to discuss facts of cases related to harassment or discrimination,. But it did not definitively cover vendors — instead, the settlement said Google would “encourage” its vendors to revisit their NDA policies.

Google contractors — known internally as “TVCs” for temps, vendors or contractors — don’t have access to the same policies and perks as regular Google employees, even though they make up more than half of Google’s total workforce. Contractors have long complained about the two-tier system, which became more glaring when the Covid-19 pandemic hit.

At the time, the company began cracking

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Hanford contractors to pay nearly $58M settlement after whistle-blowers allege massive fraud scheme

Whistleblower claims alleged fraudulent overcharges that inflated the hours of labor and billed for work that was not actually performed.

Hanford contractors involved in the long-running effort to build the site’s Waste Treatment Plant have agreed to pay a $57.75 million settlement to the U.S. Justice Department to resolve whistleblower claims of fraudulent overcharges that inflated the hours of labor and billed for work that was not actually performed.

The settlement announced Tuesday with Bechtel Corp., AECOM Energy & Construction, and an AECOM subsidiary covers work undertaken to build the Waste Treatment Plant. This construction work has soaked up many billions of federal dollars to develop a complex able to treat and stabilize hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes for long-term storage.

Back in 2016, Bechtel and subcontractor URS agreed to pay $125 million to settle allegations of subpar work and accusations of using taxpayer dollars illegally to fund a multiyear lobbying campaign.

part of the new settlement, the contractors must submit to an independent compliance review for the next three years. And in a statement released Tuesday by the U.S. Attorney’s Office of Washington’s Eastern District, the contractors came under harsh criticism.

“It is stunning that, for nearly a decade, Bechtel and AECOM chose to line their corporate pockets by diverting important taxpayer funds from this critically essential effort,” Joseph E. Harrington, first assistant attorney general for the Eastern District of Washington, said in the statement.

Teri L. Donaldson, the inspector general for the Department of Energy, said “Bechtel National Inc., AECOM Energy & Construction Inc. and (the AECOM subsidiary) Waste Treatment Completion Company LLC, engaged in a massive scheme to submit tens of millions of dollars of false claims to the U.S. Government for unallowable and unjustified costs over a period of years — a pattern of conduct that

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