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Apple Carnegie Library wins American Architecture Award in restoration and renovation category

Architecture studio Foster + Partners has received an American Architecture Award for its renovation and revitalization of the Carnegie Library of Washington D.C., which now hosts Apple Carnegie Library.

Opened in 1903, the building served as Washington D.C.’s first public library and its first desegregated public building. The building, initially designed by Ackerman & Ross, is well known for its Beaux-Arts style that draws heavily from French neoclassicism, gothic, and Renaissance elements.

The building had fallen into disuse between the turn of the twenty-first century and 2017 when Apple began renovating the library into the city’s second Apple Store location, Apple Carnegie Library.

The renovation was undertaken by Foster + Partners, a British international architecture design headquartered in London. The renovation took approximately two years, with the location reopening in May 2019.

The interior has been renovated using materials fitting the historical surroundings and inspired by the distinctive twentieth-century detailing. It is also notable for its effort in sustainability — the building features reintroduced natural ventilation and “makes generous use of daylight,” according to the American Architecture Awards’ writeup.

Like many of Apple’s retail locations, Apple has hosted free “Today at Apple” sessions focused on photography, music production, coding, and videography within the store. Apple also filmed the first episode of “Oprah’s Book Club” for Apple TV+ at the location as well.

Also housed in the building is the D.C. History Center, located on the second floor, as well as the Carnegie Gallery, located in the basement.

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Apple Contractor Foxconn Pushes Further Into Electric Vehicle Production

Foxconn Technology, the world’s biggest contract assembler of consumer electronics and main assembler of Apple products, says it has joined forces with a fellow Taiwanese hardware firm to delve further into electric vehicle production as the global market is set to grow.

The assembler founded by one of Taiwan’s richest people, billionaire Terry Gou, formed a “strategic alliance” with Yageo Group, Foxconn announced last week. The alliance will advance Foxconn’s fledgling electric vehicle business by sharing Yageo’s years of experience in EV components along with its knowhow in 5G technology and semiconductor packaging, the statement says.

“Through the cooperation with Hon Hai Group, we are able to enlarge mutual technological benefits and resource sharing to maximize the value of both groups and see multiple growths in the future,” Yageo Chairman Pierre Chen says in the statement.

Release of newer models, “pent-up” demand and supportive government policies should raise EV sales from 2021 after a drop this year caused by Covid-19 containment measures, analysis firm ResearchAndMarkets.com said in July. The global EV market is forecast to expand at an 18.4% compound annual growth rate from 2020 to 2025, fellow market analysis firm Kenneth Research forecasts.

Foxconn has tried over the past decade to reduce its dependence on contract manufacturing in the face of rising competition for workers in China and slowing growth in the global consumer electronics industry. A foray this year into medical gear is part of that drive.

Foxconn’s Chairman Young Liu announced in January that it would set up a joint venture with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles and ship EVs within two years. A month later, Foxconn said it would establish a joint venture with Yulon

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A secretive company that’s worked with Airbnb, Amazon, and Apple reportedly has a history of charging contractors to work for its corporate clients



a man sitting in front of a computer: A man works at a computer with a headset. Badias/Andia/Universal Images Group via Getty Images


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A man works at a computer with a headset. Badias/Andia/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

  • A customer service firm used by the likes of Apple, Amazon, Airbnb, and more has a history of exploiting the remote gig workers it recruits, according to a new ProPublica report.
  • Arise Virtual Solutions, which serves as a contractor to staff customer support teams, has seen booming business during the pandemic as it allows large corporations to easily hire and fire the people it contracts.
  • The report paints yet another picture of how workers in the gig economy are left vulnerable to exploitation.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A customer service firm hired by the likes of Airbnb, Amazon, Apple, and Disney has seen a burgeoning business during the pandemic. But the 25-year-old firm also has a history of worker exploitation, according to a new ProPublica report.

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Arise Virtual Solutions acts as a middleman between gig workers — who, ProPublica reports, are mostly women and people of color — and big companies, pairing the remote customer service workers with large corporate clients. Arise’s clientele includes Amazon, Apple, AT&T, Disney, eBay, Peloton, Virgin Atlantic, and many others, according to the outlet.

The corporations are drawn to Arise’s services in part because of how quickly the firm can hire workers, the report notes. But Arise can also easily fire those customer service agents, without severance or insurance, in what is another example of how rampant worker vulnerability and exploitation can be in the gig economy.

Arise has been hit with federal class-action lawsuits since 2011, with workers alleging federal labor law violations and wrongful treatment of employees. ProPublica viewed hearings, internal documents, corporate contracts, and other records, as well as spoke with multiple agents for its investigation.

The

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Apple Watch Series 6 review: minute improvements

Weirdly, the fact that the Apple Watch Series 6 is the very best smartwatch by a huge margin feels anticlimactic. That’s probably because the same was true of the Series 5, the Series 4, and even the Series 3. At this point, the company would have to massively screw something up with the Apple Watch for it to be knocked out of the lead spot.

Apple didn’t screw anything up. But that’s not the same thing as significantly moving forward, either. The Series 6’s updates comprise a bunch of very minor updates that will be unnecessary to the vast majority of people who will buy it. The headline feature, blood oxygen monitoring, also fits in that category.

Starting at $399, it’s not the best deal you can find for your wrist, but it justifies its cost by offering a ton of value — just not enough value compared to previous generations that you’d notice it. It’s an iterative update, in other words.

The Apple Watch Series 6 maintains compatibility with all the same watch straps

The Apple Watch Series 6 maintains compatibility with all the same watch straps.

Apple Watch Series 6: hardware updates

Other than the fact that there are new color options like red and blue, it’s virtually impossible to distinguish the Series 6 from its predecessor. The only tell is that the sensor array on the bottom is different to accommodate the blood oxygen sensor on the newer watch. It’s still a lozenge-shaped square with a big, beautiful screen and it still offers an array of finishes in two sizes, 44mm and 40mm.

The Series 6 has slightly faster charging — in my tests it was charging from zero to

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