Award

Colorado Springs heating contractor up for record sixth customer service award | Business

WireNut Home Services is hoping to become the first Colorado Springs business to win the Better Business Bureau of Southern Colorado‘s top customer service award six times.

The Colorado Springs-based electrical, plumbing, heating and air conditioning contractor, which won the award for the past four consecutive years and in 2009, tops the list of seven finalists for this year’s awards. All Smiles Dental Group, Endodontic Specialists of Colorado and Champion Windows & Home Exteriors also have won the awards five times, but none are finalists for this year’s award.

The nonprofit BBB has presented the award annually since 1995. It will present the 26th annual awards from 4-6 p.m. Oct. 22 during a free virtual gala on livestream and Facebook Live sponsored by Bob Penkhus Motor. The Mazda, Mitsubishi, Volkswagen and Volvo new vehicle dealer also is a finalist for the award, which would be the first for the 63-year-old business. For more information or to register for the event, go to www.bbb.org/article/events/23005-a-night-of-excellence.


2 Colorado Springs companies vying to become 5-time customer service award winners

“Completing the application process ourselves this year was incredibly eye opening for our business and has foundationally altered the way we conduct our business,” Sevan Stryker, Bob Penkhus Motor general manager, said in a news release.

The other five finalists are:

• McCloskey Motors, which was started in 1985 and also won the award in each of the past two years. (More than one winner can be announced at each year’s awards.)


Better Business Bureau recognizes 10 Colorado Springs businesses for A+ customer service

• Davis Construction, a contractor specializing in roofing, skylights, fencing, decks and home remodeling started in 2018.

• Krafted Homes, a homebuilder started in 1993.

• Serenity Paws Pet Stylist, a pet grooming business started in 2009.


BBB cites four companies,

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Abandoned house and companion cottage win Petaluma’s top renovation award

When Karen Brown went searching for a property in Petaluma where she and a longtime friend might co-invest and coexist, there was nothing on the market that fit the bill. It was 2013, the nation was coming out of a deep recession and the pickings were slim, especially for affordable properties with two units or enough area to build an accessory dwelling. So Brown walked the streets of the old west side and ended up beating the bushes — literally — to find her dream home hidden among an overgrowth of acacias.

The house was so concealed she almost missed it. A “no trespassing“ sign did not encourage exploration. But she was intrigued. There, set back on a third of an acre, was an abandoned shack with plywood nailed over the doors. It had no foundation and perched on piers in the ground. It hadn’t been occupied in at least 10 years, apart from the possum living in the front room.

Despite all that, Brown saw immediate possibilities. The property was large enough for a second small home, and there was something about the forlorn little cabin that tugged at her heart.

She came to call it “the little house that cried.”

“It was either going to get torn down or somebody was going to come along at the last minute and love it. And that’s what happened.”

Potential in the ruins

As the creative director of an educational nonprofit, Brown, with her artistic imagination, could see possibility amid the ruins. Her friend Alan Good shared her vision.

“There’s an old saying about ‘location, location, location.’ That was really clear,” said Good, a longtime horticulturist who for years managed the living roof of the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park. “West Petaluma is a wonderful place to live,

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Apple Carnegie Library wins American Architecture Award in restoration and renovation category

Architecture studio Foster + Partners has received an American Architecture Award for its renovation and revitalization of the Carnegie Library of Washington D.C., which now hosts Apple Carnegie Library.

Opened in 1903, the building served as Washington D.C.’s first public library and its first desegregated public building. The building, initially designed by Ackerman & Ross, is well known for its Beaux-Arts style that draws heavily from French neoclassicism, gothic, and Renaissance elements.

The building had fallen into disuse between the turn of the twenty-first century and 2017 when Apple began renovating the library into the city’s second Apple Store location, Apple Carnegie Library.

The renovation was undertaken by Foster + Partners, a British international architecture design headquartered in London. The renovation took approximately two years, with the location reopening in May 2019.

The interior has been renovated using materials fitting the historical surroundings and inspired by the distinctive twentieth-century detailing. It is also notable for its effort in sustainability — the building features reintroduced natural ventilation and “makes generous use of daylight,” according to the American Architecture Awards’ writeup.

Like many of Apple’s retail locations, Apple has hosted free “Today at Apple” sessions focused on photography, music production, coding, and videography within the store. Apple also filmed the first episode of “Oprah’s Book Club” for Apple TV+ at the location as well.

Also housed in the building is the D.C. History Center, located on the second floor, as well as the Carnegie Gallery, located in the basement.

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The Home Depot Announces 2020 Innovation Award Winners

Breakthroughs in cooking take top two spots

ATLANTA, Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Home Depot® today recognized the latest product innovations to hit shelves, in store and online, with the announcement of its 2020 Innovation Award winners. Supporting its DIY and Pro customers, the retailer, its merchants, and suppliers have continued to bring state-of-the-art products to the market throughout 2020.   


The Home Depot announces 2020 Innovation Award Winners

This year, The Home Depot’s overall Innovation Award winner and first runner up define innovation in cooking platforms. From frying to grilling and smoking, the top two products elevate the at-home cooking experience. In addition to appliances and grills, finalists cover categories from across the home including lighting, home security, flooring and more.

Top winners include:  

Overall Winner: The Frigidaire Air Fry Range by Electrolux saves time and space with its all-in-one stove, oven and new Air Fry Range cooking capabilities. The large-scale cooking capacity features no-flip technology that allows food to crisp evenly on all sides.

First Runner Up: The Masterbuilt Gravity-Fed Grill/Smoker enables quick-start cooking by reaching peak temperatures of 700°F faster than ever – in just 13 minutes. The innovative gravity technology holds over 12 hours of charcoal, ensuring constant fuel. Smart control technology allows for hands-off smoking, grilling, searing, baking, or roasting.

Second Runner Up: The Lutron Sunnata Touch Dimmer with LED+ Technology installs within 15 minutes with existing wiring, offering custom light control using the same captive-touch technology applied in modern touch screens to enable fast, accurate and responsive action.

“As the product authority in home improvement, we are honored to recognize our supplier partners who bring the most innovative and exclusive products to the market that deliver the best value to our customers,” said Ted Decker, president and chief operating officer for The Home Depot. “Today, we acknowledge our

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Olympic Stadium renovation wins Finlandia architecture award | Yle Uutiset


Olympiastadion on uusittu kauttaaltaan.
The renovation took into account the historical values and functionality of the building.

Image: Stadion-säätiö / Wellu Hämäläinen

The renovation of Helsinki’s Olympic Stadium, which included the addition of a multi-purpose extension and a new roof, has won the prestigious Finlandia Prize for Architecture.

The award often recognises the history and importance of older buildings in Finnish society, and last year’s winner was the modernist Serpentine House apartment complex, located in the Käpylä district of Helsinki.

Coincidentally, renowned Finnish architect Yrjö Lindegren was involved in the original design of both this year’s winner and last year’s. The 1938-constructed Olympic Stadium was designed by Lindegren and Toivo Jäntti, and was closed for four years while it underwent a major renovation, which was completed in August.

Story continues after photo.


Helsingin Olympiastadion uudistuksen jälkeen

The stadium’s capacity has been increased to 36,200.


Image:
Juha Kivioja / Yle

The Finlandia Prize winner this year was chosen by singer-songwriter and actress Paula Vesala.

“This national monument is not just a statue to look at,” Vesala was quoted as saying in a press release. “The action that takes place within its walls form those special moments of our lives: highlights, tenacious training sessions, disappointments, sweat, charm, victories and defeats. Efforts have been made to take into account the needs of a diverse group of users, but on the terms of the old building.”

Vesala added that she was most impressed by how the protection and repair work was carried out on the stadium, which respected the original spirit and appearance of the functionalist building.

“The magic of the Olympic Stadium has not only been preserved, it has gained more brilliance,” she said.

Olympic Stadium’s colourful history

The renovation was planned by two architectural firms, K2S and Architects NRT, with architects Kimmo Lintula of K2S and Kari Raimoranta

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