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City of Longmont Ballot Question 3C: Water system improvements bonds

What it asks: Shall the City of Longmont be authorized to borrow up to $80,000,000 for the purpose of financing water system improvements, including but not limited to the Nelson Flanders Water Treatment Plant Expansion Project and replacement of aging water system infrastructure like treated water storage and raw and treated water transmission lines; and shall the borrowing be evidenced by bonds, loan agreements, or other financial obligations payable solely from the City’s water utility enterprise revenues and be issued at one time or in multiple series at a price above, below or equal to the principal amount of such borrowing and with such terms and conditions, including provisions for redemption prior to maturity with or without payment of premium, as the City may determine?

What it means: Longmont is asking voters’ authorization to sell up to $80 million in bonds — backed by a five-year schedule of water rates City Council has already approved, are already in place and that will remain in place regardless of the outcome of the vote on this ballot question — to finance a variety of improvements to the city’s system of delivering raw water to its treatment plant, expanding that treatment plant, improving treated-water storage facilities and the system for transmitting treated water to homes and businesses.

What supporters say: Using bonding and debt servicing spreads out the cost of needed infrastructure improvements over time to avoid rate spikes, which keeps rates more predictable for users. Bond financing results in user rates that are initially lower than if cash were used to fund the improvements and distributes costs more equitably across both current and future residents. Bond financing allows the City of Longmont’s Water Utility to make improvements in the near future, rather than waiting until funds become available. Many of these improvements

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Anna Reynolds School renovation on the ballot for Newington voters

A $33.5 million renovation project for Anna Reynolds School will be decided by Newington voters when they go to the polls or send in their absentee ballots this election season.

The referendum question asks whether to approve $33.5 million in bonding for a renovate-to-new building project at the elementary school.

Local taxpayers would be responsible for up to $17.5 million of the cost of the project. School building grants from the state would cover the remaining cost. The town council voted unanimously to have the question added to the ballot.

If approved by voters, construction would begin in the summer of 2021 and be completed by December 2022. Students would attend the school during construction.

District officials and parents have been seeking upgrades to the school for several years as its condition has continued to deteriorate.

Built in 1954 and originally known as Northwest Elementary School, the 65,000-square-foot building suffers from a chronically leaking roof that has led some students to joke about the school’s “waterfall feature.”

Before the roof was recently repaired again, Principal Jason Smith said that 11 of the school’s 20 classrooms were experiencing leaks, which are expected to return without a new roof.

Teachers and parents have also complained about a foul odor that is emitted in the building during times of dampness and humidity and the harm it could do to those with allergies or breathing issues.

The building is also not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act requirement, has outdated plumbing, electrical and heating ventilation and air conditioning, officials say. The only air-conditioning the school has is window units around the building and open windows. Temperature control also fluctuates greatly from classroom to classroom.

Other issues include a main entrance that does not align with modern security precautions for people coming into

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