Bureau

California Farm Bureau Fears Improvements Like Barns, and Even Trees, Will Be Taxed Under Prop. 15

The most contentious issue California voters face on Nov. 3 is not the Presidential election—polls show voters are firmly decided. Rather, it is a tax measure, Proposition 15, which has heavy hitters for it and against it.

Proposition 15 would amend the California constitution to change the way commercial and industrial real estate is taxed, basing it on current market value. Presently, all property, residential and commercial, is taxed based on its last purchase price.

The measure, sometimes called the “split-roll initiative,” excludes commercial agricultural land and commercial properties worth less than $3 million from being reassessed at current market value. The non-partisan Legislative Analyst’s office estimates that Proposition 15 could bring between $6.5 billion to $11.5 billion per year when it is fully implemented in 2025.

Sixty percent of the revenues from Proposition 15 (after it pays the state and local tax assessors for the costs of implementing the measure) would go to cities, counties and special districts, 40 percent to schools and community colleges. The total for each would depend on the amount of new taxes paid by commercial properties in each community.

Supporters include the Democratic Party; Green Party; Democratic Presidential candidate Joe Biden and his running mate Sen. Kamala Harris, (who are ahead of President Trump by about 30 points in the California polls); Gov. Gavin Newsom; the California Teachers Association (a major donor) and most labor unions. 

Opponents include the California Farm Bureau Federation; the California Republican Party; the California Chamber of Commerce (also the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Black Chamber of Commerce, American Indian Chamber of Commerce and Asian-Pacific Chamber of Commerce); the California Small Business Association; the California State Conference of the NAACP and several veterans’ organizations.

Lenny Goldberg, long-time executive director of the California Tax Reform Association and Proposition 15’s main architect,

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123 Remodeling Earns Better Business Bureau Accreditation

Chicago, IL, United States – Becoming an Accredited Business with the Better Business Bureau is an honor not accorded to all businesses; because not all companies meet eligibility standards. 123 Remodeling is pleased to announce today that it has met all BBB standards and is now an Accredited Business.

“Accreditation in the BBB is by invitation only,” says Steve J. Bernas, president & CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “And only those businesses that meet our high standards and pass the review process are approved by our Board of Directors.”

As with all businesses that are Accredited by the BBB, 123 Remodeling has committed to the BBB Code of Business Practices.  The Code is a comprehensive set of policies, procedures, and best practices for treating consumers. These standards call for building trust, embodying integrity, advertising honestly, and being truthful. Bernas adds, “To maintain their Accreditation business must be transparent, honor their promises, be responsive to their customers, and safeguard their privacy.”

“We are proud to be a BBB Accredited Business,” said Ariel Darmoni, General Manage of 123 Remodeling. “In today’s unprecedented times, it is imperative that our customers know how seriously we take our commitment to excellence and good customer service. Our achieving BBB Accreditation exemplifies that goal.”

123 Remodeling offering consumers the award-winning kitchen and bathroom remodel services in Chicago, Evanston, and Northern Chicagoland area. “We desire to stay focused on what we do best: outstanding renovation projects and unsurpassed customer service,” said Ariel Darmoni.

For more information, contact:

Ariel Darmoni
+1 773-685-6095
[email protected]

About the Better Business Bureau:

As a private, non-profit organization, the purpose of the Better Business Bureau is to promote an ethical marketplace. BBBs help resolve buyer/seller complaints by means of conciliation, mediation, and arbitration. BBBs also review advertising claims,

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