businesses

Judge Barrett’s Record: Siding With Businesses Over Workers

With the opening statements and the grandstanding now over, today the nomination hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court begin in earnest, as members of the Senate Judiciary Committee launch into their questioning. Supreme Court confirmation hearings have become a high-level version of dodgeball, where nominees work tirelessly to evince no opinion on any legal matter whatsoever, using the excuse that the topic might come up before the Court in the future, and the nominee wouldn’t want to prejudge any decision.

In this case, both Barrett’s record and the entire process can be prejudged. Though she only has three years on the federal bench, Barrett has nearly two decades’ worth of law review writing from her time as a professor at Notre Dame. Everyone knows she has been installed to deliver victories on long-sought, ideologically conservative priorities, from eliminating the right to choose an abortion to the overturning of a century of labor law jurisprudence. And everyone knows conservative senators will vote in lockstep to get Barrett on the Court to commence this work. The only drama lies in whether enough of them are actually available to complete the task before the general election.

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Still, I subscribe to the school of thought that what a judicial nominee believes actually matters when confirming them to the highest court in the land. And even Barrett’s short stint as a judge has yielded a number of revealing opinions that all point to a general bias. As the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law puts it in a report released today on the Barrett record, “she is predisposed to side with law enforcement at the expense of defendants’ constitutional rights, and with employers and business interests in disputes with

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Delta leaves nearly 700,000 homes, businesses without power in Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi

Nearly 700,000 homes and businesses in Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi are in the dark after losing power due to Delta, which hit the U.S. Gulf Coast as a hurricane and has since been downgraded to a tropical depression.

According to the data aggregator PowerOutage.us, 685,195 utility customers were without power across the three states as of 2:40 p.m. ET Saturday.

That was down from the nearly 750,000 households and businesses that had power outages earlier Saturday. The highest number of outages is in Louisiana with more than 546,000.

Delta made landfall on Friday evening as a Category 2 near Creole, Louisiana, with maximum sustained winds of 100 mph. Just six weeks earlier, the Louisiana coastal area was battered by Hurricane Laura.

The storm then moved directly over Lake Charles, a waterfront city about 30 miles inland where homes and buildings were already damaged by Laura.

The storm is expected to track northeastward across the Lower Mississippi and Tennessee valleys, bringing “destructive winds and dangerous flooding,” according to the National Weather Service.

Parts of the Southeast will continue to see heavy rain, resulting in flash floods. A few tornadoes are also possible for the area, while New England was advised to prepare for strong to severe thunderstorms.

Lake Charles Mayor Nic Hunter, who rode out Delta’s arrival downtown, said tarps were flying off homes across the city and piles of wreckage were being blown around, some of it floating in the surge of ocean water.

Brian Schexnayder walks down a flooded street Saturday in Iowa, La.Jonathan Bachman / Reuters

“I’m in a building right now with a tarp on it and just the sound of the tarp flapping on the building sounds like someone pounding with a sledgehammer on top of the building,“ Hunter said. ”It’s pretty intense.”

In Lake

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Wisconsin Residents React to Damage Caused to Homes and Businesses During Chaotic Night In Wauwatosa

WAUWATOSA, Wisc. — A caravan of Black Lives Matter protesters had made it about 6 miles from Milwaukee to Wauwatosa Wednesday evening before being stopped by police in riot gear. Rioters in the crowd began to throw projectiles at the police line, prompting officers to deploy tear gas and pepper balls.

It was a scene that has been played out, too often, in American cities since late May, except this time it was not taking place in the downtown area of a major city. It was happening in residential neighborhoods. The protests were sparked after Wauwatosa officer Joseph Mensah was not charged in a shooting that led to the death of 17-year-old Alvin Cole. Cole was killed on February 2 when he opened fire on officers.

Prior to the confrontation, some in the BLM crowd had smashed windows or threw large rocks through windows of businesses along their path. Businesses damaged included a Kumon tutoring center and a dry cleaners, but rioters did not just target stores.

A small apartment complex was then targeted, with people again throwing rocks through the windows. This time other people in the crowd begged the agitators to stop because that was too far even for them. It only stopped after some ran up to prevent more destruction, but by then the damage was already done.

Jeff, the owner of the apartment complex, was busy at work Thursday morning to clean up the mess and was making the repairs to the building.

He told Townhall four people lived in one of the apartment complexes, but only one person was home at the time it was

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Hundreds of businesses in San Antonio have ‘Alamo’ in the name

On Aug. 9, 2007, Ed Jewett and Roland Gonzales certified their new small business with the Texas Secretary of State.

Alamo Handyman.

Asked 13 years later to recall why the lifelong friends chose that name, Jewett chuckled, “Gosh I don’t know.”

READ ALSO: New poll raises question: Who are the 1% of Texans who haven’t heard of Whataburger?

Jewett, born and raised in San Antonio, said he hoped people would hear “Alamo” and think the brand-new company had been around a long time. The business has since expanded from a single handyman to a regional service provider that performs complete home overhauls.

The friends were one of many budding entrepreneurs to adopt the landmark’s name. Area business listings turn up over 600 companies with Alamo in their title — and that doesn’t include those with Alamo Heights or Ranch.

The enterprises range from Alamo Botanicals to Alamo Xtreme AC & Heating, with just about every other industry in between.

“There’s all kinds of businesses with Alamo in it,” Jewett said. “People get us confused.”

Some customer confusion is understandable: Alamo Handyman competes with Alamo City Handymen.

Although Jewett launched his business back when advertising in the yellow pages still mattered, he did not pick “Alamo” to place near the top of the alphabetical order. Other companies, which stack a few A’s at the beginning of their name, might have a different origin story.

Asked if Alamo Handyman might prove as durable as the 18th century mission, Jewett laughed.

“I don’t think I’ll be around that long. Maybe the company will.”

Here are the more than 600 companies in San Antonio that use the name “Alamo”:

A Alamo Bail Bonds
A Alamo Strip a Dancer
A1 Alamo Foam Roofing & Insulation
AAA Alamo Cooling
AAA Alamo Mini Storage
Air Alamo Service

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Over 600 businesses in San Antonio are named ‘Alamo.’ How many can you name?

On Aug. 9, 2007, Ed Jewett and Roland Gonzales certified their new small business with the Texas Secretary of State.



a person is walking down the street in front of a building: Businesses across the state assume the Alamo connotation such as the Alamo Cafe.


© Provided by mySA

Businesses across the state assume the Alamo connotation such as the Alamo Cafe.


Alamo Handyman.

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Asked 13 years later to recall why the lifelong friends chose that name, Jewett chuckled, “Gosh I don’t know.”

READ ALSO: New poll raises question: Who are the 1% of Texans who haven’t heard of Whataburger?

Jewett, born and raised in San Antonio, said he hoped people would hear “Alamo” and think the brand-new company had been around a long time. The business has since expanded from a single handyman to a regional service provider that performs complete home overhauls.

The friends were one of many budding entrepreneurs to adopt the landmark’s name. Area business listings turn up over 600 companies with Alamo in their title — and that doesn’t include those with Alamo Heights or Ranch.

The enterprises range from Alamo Botanicals to Alamo Xtreme AC & Heating, with just about every other industry in between.

“There’s all kinds of businesses with Alamo in it,” Jewett said. “People get us confused.”

Some customer confusion is understandable: Alamo Handyman competes with Alamo City Handymen.

Although Jewett launched his business back when advertising in the yellow pages still mattered, he did not pick “Alamo” to place near the top of the alphabetical order. Other companies, which stack a few A’s at the beginning of their name, might have a different origin story.

Asked if Alamo Handyman might prove as durable as the 18th century mission, Jewett laughed.

“I don’t think I’ll be around that long. Maybe the company will.”

Here are the more than 600 companies in San Antonio that use the name “Alamo”:

A Alamo Bail Bonds

A Alamo

Continue Reading