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What about $490,000 can buy in Sumner County


Nashville Tennessean

Published 5:01 a.m. CT Oct. 13, 2020

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BETHPAGE

206 Dry Fork Creek Road, Bethpage 37022

Year built: 1999

Square feet: 1,813

Price: $490,000

Description: Four-bedroom, three-bathroom home sits on 20.87-acre lot. Home has marble fire place, stainless steel appliances and hardwood floors, new double pane windows, master on main floor. Private guest quarters upstairs include bedroom, full bath and family room. HVAC split units are 1 and 2 years old.

206 Dry Fork Creek Road, Bethpage 37022 (Photo: Homes.com)

More photoshttps://www.homes.com/property/206-dry-fork-creek-rd-bethpage-tn-37022/id-600029116327/

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GALLATIN

1034 S. Browns Lane, Gallatin 37066

Year built: 1989

Square feet: 2,927

Price: $489,000

Description: Three-bedrooms, three-bathroom home sits on just over an acre on treed lot with winding drive. Home has in-ground pool, covered porches. Main level has living room with fireplace, formal dining, kitchen with breakfast bay, Florida room, two-car rear entry garage, new windows and HVAC.

1034 S. Browns Lane, Gallatin 37066 (Photo: Homes.com)

More photoshttps://www.homes.com/property/1034-s-browns-ln-gallatin-tn-37066/id-600029134006/

GOODLETTSVILLE

107 Elizabeth Court, Goodlettsville 37072

Year built: 2015

Square feet: 3,128

Price: $489,900

Description: Home has three bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, living room with 18-foot ceilings, eat-in kitchen with granite, detailed back-splash and wine cooler. Master suite has walk-in closet with custom built-ins. Home has bonus room or fourth bedroom option, exercise room, loft/office, utility room with laundry chute.

107 Elizabeth Court, Goodlettsville 37072 (Photo: Homes.com)

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AutoZone and Three Other Retailers to Buy for the Election

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AutoZone is on Wells Fargo analyst Zachary Fadem’s list of best ideas..


Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

With the presidential election just over three weeks away,

Wells Fargo

took a look at what the results could mean for the retail sector. The bank found that the best bets are in home improvement and auto parts.

Analyst Zachary Fadem noted that Democratic nominee Joe Biden, now leading in the polls, has pledged to return corporate taxes to their level before the 2017 tax cuts, at around 28%. While that might be a concern for investors, he said retailers have advantages that could help offset the pain.

If limits on state and local tax deductions are also removed, he said, many consumers may spend more. Potential new tax credits, such as for child care, could also put more money into the pockets of low- and middle-class consumers, funds they might use for more shopping.

Ultimately, he said risks linked to the election are “relatively low for our coverage,” making it likely that recent trends will continue. He listed

AutoZone

(ticker: AZO),

O’Reilly Automotive

(ORLY),

Home Depot

(HD), and

Lowe’s

(LOW) as his best ideas, as he has previously.

In the five most recent election years, Fadem said, so-called hardline retailers, selling durable goods, outperformed the broader market in the three-, six-, and 12-month periods post-election.

Tractor Supply

(TSCO), O’Reilly,

Best Buy

(BBY), and

Williams-Sonoma

(WSM) were “notable standouts,” he said.

The pattern also held true in the final two months of presidential election years, which could bode well for the group going into the end of 2020.

With current tariffs remaining in place, the 28% tax rate Biden favors would chip away about 9% from the group’s earnings per share, on average, he says. Retailers with exposure to the highest-tax states, such

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What $1M can buy in the Nashville area


Nashville Tennessean

Published 5:02 a.m. CT Oct. 10, 2020

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DAVIDSON

1807 Tyne Blvd, Nashville 37215

Year built: 1974

Square feet: 3,818

Price: $1M

Description: Four-bedroom, four-bathroom home has been renovated but retaining all the features of Robert Anderson architecture. Home is set on 2.5 wooded acres with views and is minutes from Green Hills.

1807 Tyne Blvd., Nashville 37215 (Photo: Homes.com)

More photoshttps://www.homes.com/property/1807-tyne-blvd-nashville-tn-37215/id-600027794949/

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SUMNER

122 Bayview Drive, Hendersonville 37075

Year built: 1986

Square feet: 7,800

Price: $1M

Description: Home has entry foyer, five bedrooms each with a full bath, five fireplaces, two living rooms, media room, office, gym and den with bar. Home has three-car carage with separate workshop, circular driveway, one covered and two open patios, koi pond and inground pool. 

122 Bayview Drive, Hendersonville 37075 (Photo: Homes.com)

More photos: https://www.homes.com/property/hendersonville-tn-37075/id-600029153667/

MAURY

2050 Bear Paw Trail, Columbia 38401

Year built: 2006

Square feet: 4,771

Price: $1M

Description: Home has private lane situated off the main road, on almost 19 acres. Home has three bedrooms, 3.5 bathrooms, gas log masonry fireplace, bonus room, new flooring, new backsplash, views from the deck and storm shelter. 

2050 Bear Paw Trail, Columbia 38401 (Photo: Homes.com)

More photoshttps://www.homes.com/property/1789-tom-j-hitch-pkwy-columbia-tn-38401/id-1000040811393/

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Coppell man charged with scamming $17 million in PPP money to buy luxury cars and homes

Federal investigators say a Coppell man fraudulently applied for dozens of federal stimulus PPP grants and received more than $17 million that he spent buying real estate and luxury cars such as a Bentley and a Corvette.



Government prosecutors have now charged dozens of people with fraudulently receiving grants from the Payroll Protection Program.


© Brian Elledge/Staff Photographer/The Dallas Morning News/TNS
Government prosecutors have now charged dozens of people with fraudulently receiving grants from the Payroll Protection Program.

A coalition of federal agencies charged Dinesh Sah, 55, of Coppell, with applying for $24.8 million in PPP loans for 15 businesses that claimed to have more than 500 employees, but in fact, many of the businesses were registered after the CARES Act was passed and did not have any employees, according to court documents detailing the indictment.

“Mr. Sah exploited this terrible pandemic for personal gain – and he should be held accountable to the American people for that behavior,” said U.S. Attorney Erin Nealy Cox in a statement. “COVID-19 has devastated the finances of hardworking business owners across the nation. PPP funds should be reserved for those who really need them to keep their companies afloat.”

Sah was arrested Sept. 16 and remains in custody, said a spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney’s office for the Northern District of Texas.

Sah is one of dozens indicted by government prosecutors for fraudulently applying for forgivable loans through the Payroll Protection Program, the $650 billion slice of the CARES Act designed to help small businesses cover costs for wages, rent and utilities. Among those charged with fraud were a former NFL football player and a former reality television star.

More than 5.2 million loans were approved nationwide. According to the U.S. Treasury Department, Texas businesses were approved for more than $41 billion in grants that were intended to go to businesses with 500 employees or fewer.

The indictment said

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How you can buy a home with a low-down-payment FHA mortgage

Many people consider homeownership part of the American dream — but can’t dream of landing a traditional mortgage. That’s why FHA loans exist.

These loans that are backed by the Federal Housing Administration are popular with first-time buyers and those with lower incomes. While you might need a credit score of 620 for a conventional loan, you could be approved for an FHA loan with a score of 500. And you could be eligible for a down payment of only 3.5%.

They’re not just for new buyers, either. You can use your FHA loan to refinance your mortgage or even repair an older home.

Sound appealing? FHA loans do offer some attractive features, but they may not be right for everyone.

How do FHA loans work?

Jirapong Manustrong / Shutterstock

Congress established the Federal Housing Administration in 1934 to help borrowers get a mortgage, especially those who would otherwise have trouble qualifying.

FHA loans are insured by the government agency. So while the loans are issued by private lenders, the FHA is taking on the risk. If you can’t pay your debt, the government steps in to pay the lender.

With less risk involved, lenders have the confidence to be a bit more lenient with their underwriting standards. Even if they don’t have pristine credit, today’s borrowers can secure FHA loans with historically low mortgage rates and lower down payments.

But the FHA limits how much you can borrow, based on where you live.

The maximum FHA loan for a single-family home in a low-cost county is $331,760. But in more expensive housing markets, that number will rise higher toward the upper limit of $765,600. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) offers a search engine to help you find the limit in your area.

Mortgage insurance

In

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