capacity

Maryland to remove child care capacity limits, allow indoor visitation at nursing homes

As coronavirus infections and deaths continue at a low, steady pace in Maryland, Gov. Larry Hogan on Thursday relaxed more pandemic-induced restrictions — and encouraged residents to prepare for the upcoming flu season.

Nursing homes that have limited visitors to outdoor meetings will now be able to offer indoor visits if the facility doesn’t have an outbreak or any new positive cases in the last 14 days, Hogan said. If the local jurisdiction’s positivity rate rises above 10%, no visitors will be allowed, as well.

And child care centers can increase the number of children they serve. Providers will now be able to operate at full capacity.

Since May, Hogan has gradually lifted restrictions so that almost all businesses are open in some fashion, though most must operate with capacity limits and follow health precautions. Masks continue to be required in indoor spaces and outdoors when social distancing is not possible.

The expansion of child care will likely come as a relief to both child care businesses that operate on tight margins and parents who have struggled to find quality care while public schools continue to operate remotely.

Child care centers have been limited to no more than 15 individuals per classroom since July — an increase over restrictions from earlier in the pandemic, but less than the pre-pandemic limits of up to 20 children per group for certain ages.

State schools superintendent Karen Salmon said health officials have seen few cases in child care centers, calling the operators “heroes” who go out of their way to keep children safe. But even as more providers reopened — 82% — demand remains high due to classroom restrictions.

Salmon said that hopefully this action will help crack down on the number of unlicensed child care centers that have opened up to facilitate

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New Bryant-Denny Stadium capacity revealed after renovation

A little more than a week before a delayed reopening, Bryant-Denny Stadium’s renovations are wrapping up.



Bryant-Denny Stadium is undergoing a $107 million renovation with the first game of the 2020 season.


© Ben Flanagan | [email protected]/al.com/TNS
Bryant-Denny Stadium is undergoing a $107 million renovation with the first game of the 2020 season.

Texas A&M will visit next Saturday in the first game in a reduced-capacity stadium that received an $107 million update.

The stadium will seat just under 20,000 fans as part of the social distancing requirements, Alabama athletics director Greg Byrne said in a Thursday interview with AL.com.



a close up of a green building: Bryant-Denny Stadium is undergoing a $107 million renovation with the first game of the season scheduled for Sept.12, 2020.


© Ben Flanagan | [email protected]/al.com/TNS
Bryant-Denny Stadium is undergoing a $107 million renovation with the first game of the season scheduled for Sept.12, 2020.

Byrne also revealed the new capacity of the 91-year old stadium when it can be filled to the brim again one day.

Bryant-Denny Stadium will now seat 100,077 after the offseason renovations to club and luxury seating.

It had a capacity of 101,821 since the 2010 addition of the south end zone upper deck and luxury seating.

The new capacity will not impact Alabama’s standing on the list of largest college football stadiums. It remains No. 7, just behind LSU’s Tiger Stadium that seats 102,321. Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor remains the largest with seats for 107,601.

RELATED: Saban: ‘We don’t have a lot of guys out for the game’

Alabama’s shift to a slightly smaller capacity follows the trend of colleges pulling back from the arms race for the biggest while shifting to emphasize the premium experience.

It’s a smaller dip in total Bryant-Denny capacity than originally planned. The 2018 announcement of the overhaul called to remove most of the south end zone upper deck to make way for a massive video board and standing spaces. Byrne at the time said he expected the capacity to dip below the 100,000 mark

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