Capital

Online Business Ideas You Can Start Even with Small Capital

Running an online business and being your own boss definitely has its appeal. In fact, it’s so enticing that the number of registered online businesses in the country is now 40 times more in the past five months[1]. Definitely, the internet is a great medium to connect with customers without leaving home. However, starting an online business also has its challenges—the biggest one is coming up with enough money for capital. But don’t worry because there are many online business ideas you can start for as low as PHP 2,000.

Want to take the leap? Keep on reading to learn more about online business ideas in the Philippines you can start in 2020.

Online Business Ideas 2020

1. Make Artisanal Candles

online business ideas 2020 – candle business

Aromatherapy candles can help people relax after a tiring day. They are perfect to cap off a busy workday, especially now that most professionals are working from home. They’re quite easy to make as well. Add your own flair and essential oil blends to create the most calming candles.

Starting capital: PHP 5,000 – PHP 20,000

Materials and equipment needed:

  • Double boiler
  • Candle-making wax
  • Wicks
  • Essential oils
  • Coloring agents
  • Molds
  • Dried flowers (optional)
  • Tin can or glasses as containers

Candle making is one of the easiest online business ideas out there. You can do it at home, even if you have a small space. The profit margin is also high, with quality, artisanal candles selling for as much as PHP 1,000 each.

Read more: 10 Steps to Starting an Online Business in the Philippines

2. Offer Online Tutorials

online business ideas 2020 – online tutorial

 

The country has been in quarantine for more than seven months, forcing students to take their classes online. Students find it hard to

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In war-hit Karabakh capital, residents inspect destroyed homes

Guennadi Avanessian had a big two-storey house at 28 Saroyan Street, with a wooden terrace and vines laden with dark grapes.

But his comfortable middle-class home in a well-off street in the capital of war-hit Nagorno-Karabakh region has been smashed to pieces during the conflict between neighbouring Azerbaijan and Armenia.

“I spent two years renovating this house with my own hands, and (Azerbaijani president) Aliyev destroyed it in two seconds with his bombs,” Avanessian rages to anyone who will listen from behind his moustache.

With a blue hat on his head, the 70-something clambers onto the huge heap of debris that is all that remains after the gutted house collapsed in on itself.

With a shovel, he searches through the twisted sheet metal, bits and pieces of the home’s structure and traces of his former life.

Azerbaijani forces bombarded the area a week ago, and it is the first time Avanessian has returned.

He is looking to scrape together whatever can be salvaged during a lull in the fighting after a ceasefire came into force on Saturday at noon.

“I was here when the rocket came down. I heard a whistle and I rushed into the cellar. I was two seconds away from being killed,” he recalls.

His son-in-law, also in the house that day, got away with an injury — a minor miracle given the total destruction visited on the house.

“It’s a Smerch rocket that did this,” Avanessian says, referring to the Soviet-era “Tornado” projectiles that have been falling throughout Karabakh’s largest city during the past week of fighting over the ethnic Armenian breakaway territory.

“Where will I live now? Under the stars, under the rain? I had everything and now I have nothing left, I can’t find anything. Everything’s blown apart. The only thing I could find

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Xenia plans to spend $54M on capital improvements in next 5 years

Xenia City Council will consider approving a plan for all the city-funded projects to come in the next five years, including about $2 million a year on streets and a new fire station on the west side of town.



a car driving on a city street filled with lots of traffic: Dayton Daily News


© Chuck Hamlin
Dayton Daily News

The capital improvement plan has about $54 million of projects and improvements planned throughout the next five years. The city plans to spend about $2.4 million on streets annually, with some of those funds coming from grants, said Assistant City Manager Jared Holloway.

Holloway and City Manager Brent Merriman said conversations about some streets and storm water projects took a back seat in 2020 because of the coronavirus.

The city conducted a pavement condition index study in February 2020. Based on the condition of the streets in Xenia, the city plans for a minimum of $800,000 a year to be spent on rehabilitating roads.

Merriman said the pavement study projects the pavement condition will continue to decline unless the city spends about $2.2 million a year on roads to keep up with repairs. The capital improvement plan says the city will need to come up with “an enhanced funding scheme” that will ensure there will be more money committed to the street fund. Xenia voters rejected a streets levy in 2018.

The state gas tax will bolster the street fund in the future, but the coronavirus pandemic has impacted the revenues for that tax in fiscal year 2020.

The city is continuing to explore other options to keep up with road repairs, according to the capital improvement plan.

Streets projects are also funded through the city’s general fund. The city plan states that over 80% of the planned expenses from the general fund in 2021 will be on infrastructure, like resurfacing Bellbrook Avenue, a

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San Joaquin Valley Homes and Presidio Residential Capital Close on Two Parcels of Land in Visalia, Calif.

VISALIA, Calif., Oct. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — San Joaquin Valley Homes (SJV Homes) and Presidio Residential Capital recently closed on two land parcels in Visalia to build a total of 121 single-family detached homes with single-level floor plans.

The first parcel on 19 acres, is named Arbor Gates and will introduce 91 lots near the northwest corner of Visalia Parkway and Demaree Street in southwest Visalia. The second, Cameron Court, encompasses nearly five acres near the southwest corner of Caldwell Avenue and Court Street in Visalia and will offer 30 lots. Model construction for both is planned for December 2020.

“We can’t wait to introduce homebuyers to these two new beautiful communities,” said Danny Garcia, vice president of sales at SJV Homes. “Both of these neighborhoods are in great locations in Visalia.”

Arbor Gates will be a gated community of garden-style homes and includes a neighborhood park. The lots are an average 5,600 square feet, and the homes will range from 1,297 to 1,597 square feet with such features as nine-foot ceilings, granite countertops, stainless steel appliances and some with covered patios. They will have three bedrooms, two bathrooms and attached two-car garages.

Cameron Court is a more intimate-sized neighborhood with just 30 detached garden homes on lots averaging 5,500 square feet. These three-bedroom, two-bathroom homes will also be 1,297 to 1,597 square feet and feature amenities similar to Arbor Gates.

Both Cameron Court and Arbor Gates are south of Highway 198, the major east-west corridor in the region. Major retail, dining and services are less than one mile from both communities.

Students living at both communities can attend Cottonwood Creek Elementary School, La Joya Middle School and El Diamante High School – all in the Visalia Unified School District.

These communities represent SJV

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Capital Region nursing homes fined $32K for COVID-19 violations

Three Capital Region nursing homes have been fined by the state Department of Health for infection control and other lapses during the coronavirus pandemic, state health records show.

The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing at Barnwell in Columbia County received one of the largest fines statewide at $22,000 for multiple violations that had “potential to cause more than minimal harm,” according to inspection reports. Violations centered around inadequate or improper use of personal protective equipment, failure to clean hands, improper groupings of suspected COVID-19 patients, and failure to notify residents of positive cases or deaths.

Two other facilities in the region — the Glens Falls Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing in Queensbury and Eddy Memorial Geriatric Center in Troy — received smaller fines of $6,000 and $4,000, respectively, for violations related to PPE use, hand hygiene and disinfection protocols.

Both Barnwell and the Glens Falls Center have experienced the region’s deadliest known coronavirus outbreaks with at least 20 resident deaths in each facility. The Eddy center in Troy has lost at least three residents to the virus.

The state Department of Health has conducted 1,908 on-site inspections (1,165 at nursing homes and 743 at adult care facilities) since the pandemic’s March arrival in New York to ensure facilities are following proper infection prevention and control protocol, spokeswoman Jill Montag said. It has issued 95 citations to 77 nursing homes and levied $328,000 in fines against 23 facilities as a result.

“This only represents a portion of the total number of cases for which we are actively pursuing fines,” Montag said. “The department will continue to hold providers who violate regulations accountable for their actions.”

Barnwell

State health inspectors cited the Barnwell nursing home, a 236-bed facility located in the village of Valatie, for a number of regulatory violations that were allegedly

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