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Home Depot Names Merchandising Chief Decker President and COO

Home Depot  (HD) – Get Report named a new president and chief operating officer — Edward Decker, who currently is its executive vice president of merchandising.

Decker, 57, earlier had held the post of senior vice president of retail finance, pricing analytics, and assortment planning at the Atlanta home-improvement chain. He joined Home Depot in 2000. The president and COO positions are new at Home Depot.

Home Depot shares recently traded $276.56, down 0.4%, on a down day on Wall Street. The stock has advanced 55% over the past six months as consumers, locked down during the pandemic, put a lot into fixing up their homes.

In addition to Decker’s appointment, Ann-Marie Campbell has been named executive vice president of U.S. stores and international operations. She adds responsibility for all operations, business functions and strategy for the Canada and Mexico businesses.

And Jeff Kinnaird has been named executive vice president of merchandising, reporting to Decker. He was previously president of Home Depot Canada.

Morningstar analyst Jaime Katz is bullish on Home Depot.

It “continues to benefit from a still stable housing market along with improvements in its merchandising and distribution network,” she wrote in a commentary last month.

“Its flexible distribution network will help elevate the firm’s brand intangible asset, with faster time to delivery improving the do-it-yourself … experience and market delivery centers catering to the pro business. 

“The success of ongoing initiatives should set the operating margin back on an improving trajectory in 2022, as investments wind down.”

Katz nonetheless sees the stock as overvalued, putting its fair value at $200.

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The Home Depot Names Ted Decker President and Chief Operating Officer; Announces Additional Senior Leadership Promotions

ATLANTA, Oct. 2, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Home Depot®, the world’s largest home improvement retailer, today announced that Edward “Ted” P. Decker has been named president and chief operating officer, effective October 5, 2020. Decker, a 20-year veteran of the company, has served as executive vice president of merchandising since 2014. As the company’s chief merchant, he has been responsible for all store and online merchandising departments, merchandising strategy, services and vendor management, marketing and in-store environment. In his new role, he will assume additional responsibility for global store operations, global supply chain, and outside sales and service.

“Ted is an incredible leader who has enhanced our competitiveness and interconnected strategy by blending the art and science of retail while also driving outstanding results with both our in-store and online customer experience,” said Craig Menear, chairman and CEO of The Home Depot. “We are extremely fortunate to have what I believe to be one of the finest executive leadership teams in retail. Ted’s promotion and the additional changes we are announcing will further strengthen the team’s strategic leadership and operational efficiency, while I continue to focus over the next few years on the long-term growth and strategic positioning of the company.”

Ann-Marie Campbell has been named executive vice president of U.S. stores and international operations, adding responsibility for all operations, business functions and strategy for the company’s Canada and Mexico businesses to her current responsibilities. The presidents of The Home Depot Canada and The Home Depot Mexico will now report to her. Campbell, a 35-year veteran of The Home Depot, will now lead more than 2,200 stores and 400,000 associates.   

Jeff Kinnaird has been promoted to executive vice president of merchandising, reporting to Decker. Most recently, he was president of The Home Depot Canada. He

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Tim Griffin, The Kitchen’s Director and Chief Curator, Steps Down

A search for Griffin’s successor is being conducted by Isaacson Miller.

Tim Griffin, The Kitchen's Director and Chief Curator, Steps Down

The Kitchen has announced that its director and chief curator, Tim Griffin, will be stepping down from the position at the end of this year.

During his tenure, Griffin organized with The Kitchen team significant projects by artists including Chantal Akerman, ANOHNI, Charles Atlas, Gretchen Bender, Abraham Cruzvillegas, Ralph Lemon, Aki Sasamoto, and Tyshawn Sorey, among many others, in addition to thematic exhibitions such as “From Minimalism into Algorithm.” The organization also developed new initiatives and programs including “The Kitchen L.A.B.,” an interdisciplinary discussion series which keyed thematic seasons since 2012; and the electronic music series “Synth Nights.” Following the spread of COVID-19, the organization also launched The Kitchen Broadcast and revised its residencies to operate with a TV studio model.

During the past two years, Griffin has focused on fundraising in anticipation of The Kitchen’s 50th anniversary in 2021 and the anticipated renovation of its building on 19th Street in Chelsea. The organization has raised approximately $11 million heading into a special benefit exhibition, “Ice and Fire,” which is curated by Kitchen board members Wade Guyton and Jacqueline Humphries and opens on October 1.

Griffin will continue as an advisor to ensure a smooth transition and on 50th anniversary initiatives, while taking a position as Visiting Associate Professor in the departments of Art History and English at the Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. His wife, Johanna Burton, is director of the Wexner Center for the Arts.

The Kitchen Chair of the Board Greg Feldman says: “All of us at The Kitchen express our gratitude to Tim for his remarkable leadership during the past decade as both a visionary curator and fundraiser, and at a key point in The Kitchen’s history.”

“I can’t imagine a more inspiring or

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What daunting task? New chief takes Logan’s turnaround in stride

Photo courtesy of Logan’s Roadhouse

For a good chunk of his 25-plus years in the restaurant business, Jim Mazany has been the handyman who’s dispatched to get a casual chain humming again. He did it with Joe’s Crab Shack and a sizeable piece of TGI Friday’s. Maybe that’s why he sizes up his new and likely stiffest challenge, restoking the fire of Logan’s Steakhouse and Old Chicago Pizza & Taphouse, with the verbal equivalent of a shrug.

Mazany has just been named CEO of SPB Hospitality, the investment company that bought Logan’s Roadhouse and Old Chicago out of bankruptcy in late spring. The brands were among the earliest high-profile victims of the pandemic, a result of operating under what the bankruptcy court overseeing the concepts at the time might have termed pre-existing conditions. Not long after COVID-19 arrived on the coasts, SPB’s predecessor company announced that it would  “mothball” both chains and their sister brewpub concepts, some 261 restaurants in all at the time, because it had no cash or access to liquidity.

The blackeye deepened when reports surfaced of employees learning of the shutdowns from the news coverage that followed. A mother reached out to Restaurant Business to verify that her son was out of a job, out of a paycheck and even out of a contact person at that predecessor company, CraftWorks Holdings.  It was not a Churchill-like moment of leadership. And it looked even worse when the company alerted the furloughed employees that they had been fired and their benefits had been stopped.

To make matters worse, the CEO and CFO of CraftWorks forwarded $7 million in collected sales taxes to state collectors as usual before April 1, as if the world hadn’t been turned upside down and tax moratoriums proposed. When the bankruptcy court discovered that

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