City

Renovation of Ton Duc Thang Museum begins in HCM City

The renovation of the Ton Duc Thang Museum began in HCM City on Monday.

The museum, located on 6,021sq.m, will include a modern exhibition building of 2,000sq.m with a basement and four storeys.  

Renovation of Ton Duc Thang Museum begins in HCM City
Ton Duc Thang Museum attracted nearly 2 million visitors last year. Its rebuilding began in HCM City on October 12. The museum, located on an area of 6,021sq.m, will include five display areas that will feature images, documents and objects about the Communist Party of Vietnam, its establishment, role, leadership and developments. (Photo courtesy of the museum)

The building will have five display areas which will feature photos, documents and objects about the Communist Party of Vietnam and its establishment, role, leadership and development in different periods. 

The investment, VND275.7 billion (US$11million), came from the city’s budget.

According to the museum’s director Pham Thanh Nam, the museum’s artefacts and documents have been transferred for storage at the Ho Chi Minh Museum Branch.

Ton Duc Thang Museum is named after the late President Ton Duc Thang, founder of the first workers’ union in Vietnam in 1920. 

Thang was born in 1888 in An Giang Province’s Long Xuyen City. He joined the patriotic movement against the French colonialists at a young age.

He moved to France and participated in the workers’ movements there, as well as the uprising of the French Navy in the Black Sea in support of the October Revolution in Russia.

In the 1920s, he returned to Vietnam and led the workers’ movement in Sai Gon (now HCM City) with the Ba Son strike, the most prominent example of the movement’s activities. He joined and became a leader of the Vietnam Revolutionary Youth Union.

In 1929, the French colonialists arrested and sentenced him to 20 years in Con Dao Prison. One year later, he joined the

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Lakewood eyeing OPWC funds for water main improvements throughout city

LAKEWOOD, Ohio — This summer Lakewood was awarded $750,000 in Water Main Replacement Project funds from the Ohio Public Works Commission (OPWC).

Now the city is planning to begin work next spring on Lauderdale Avenue (between Detroit and Madison avenues), Leedale Avenue (between Lake Avenue and Edgewater Boulevard) and Elbur Avenue (Between Athens Avenue and Lakewood Heights Boulevard).

“This is all part of our yearly OPWC grant application for water main improvements,” Lakewood City Engineer Mark K. Papke said. “These projects are currently in design. They’ll be going out to bid in the first quarter 2021, start in May and wrap up around November.”

The project cost is $4,716,850. In addition to the grant, the OPWC is also providing a zero-percent 20-year loan for $866,850. That means the city’s total contribution is nearly $4 million.

“These water mains were installed in the early 1900s,” Papke said. “Most of them are six-inch in diameter and cast iron. They get tuberculated — the metal grows on the inside of the pipe and reduces the diameter, which affects water flow.

“Also a lot of these have lead service connections that are being replaced with copper. So we upsized the water main to eight-inch diameter and put in six-inch fire hydrants rather than the existing four-inch. It improves the flow.”

Lakewood is also applying for the next round of OPWC funds to cover a sewer improvement project planned for portions of Andrews Avenue (Detroit Avenue to Clifton Boulevard) and Gladys Avenue (Detroit Avenue to Clifton Boulevard).

“Length-wise, the project is similar to the 2021 project, but we’re also including some necessary sewer improvements,” Papke said. “Some areas require heavier sewer upgrades than other ones.”

The city engineer said Lakewood not only entered into the agreement in July, but is currently at 75 percent of

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2020 General Election: Carson City Supervisor Ward 2

Maurice “Mo” White

Position sought: Carson City Supervisor, Ward 2

Occupation: Retired Diesel Mechanic.

Age: 62

Contact: MauriceForWard2.com; 775-297-6484; [email protected]; Facebook Maurice For Ward 2

Maurice “Mo” White
White

Record of service: Due to an eye injury at 12 years old I was not able to serve in the military.

Volunteer work: 1991 – 1995 Cofounder and board member Carson City Pop Warner

1991 – 1995 member – Carson City Youth Sports Association

2008 – present member – Ormsby Sportsman’s Association

2010 – present founded – Veterans Guest House Endowment Fund

2010 – present member – Community Foundation of Western Nevada Legacy Society

2013 – 2017    member – Carson City Airport Authority

2013 – present  member – Sierra Nevada Forums Steering Committee

2015 – present  Board of directors Nevada State Prison Preservation Society

2019 – present   member of The Peregrine Fund Leadership Council

The Parts House, Gardnerville, Nevada

April 2008 – September 2008

Position : Outside salesman

BMSW Excavation, Sparks, Nevada

October 2006 – August 2007

Position : Head Mechanic / Hot Tap specialist

Auto Marine Machine, Carson City, Nevada

June 2005 – September 2006

Position : Engine builder / Machinist / Department Manager

Douglas County School District, Minden, Nevada

December 1978 – July 2005

Position : Equipment Mechanic / Head Mechanic

For a more complete biography please visit my website, MauriceForWard2.com

Education: Douglas High School: Graduated 1977

 Arizona Automotive Institute: Graduated 1978

Western Nevada Community College: 21 credits 1993-2002

Chamber of Commerce Leadership Institute Graduated 2013

Throughout his career inservice training and certification efforts were ever present. Mo received many certificates and accreditations in my 40 year career, including Master Mechanic and Technician Specialist in multiple categories.

Platform: As a lifelong resident of Carson City Mo enjoys the diversity of its residents and  opportunities the City provides. Borrowing

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City Hall Notebook: Timeline for DCU Center improvements up in the air – News – telegram.com

When the city hit the pause button back in the early spring on the planned Phase 2 master plan improvements for the DCU Center because of funding uncertainty resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, it was hoped it could be restarted in January.

Of course, no one back then foresaw that the city-owned DCU Center would remain closed seven months later. It is now expected to remain dark at least through the end of this year.

As a result, the possibility of a January restart for the project seems very much up in the air.

John Odell, the city’s director of energy and assets, told the Civic Center Commission last week that the restart will be determined when the revenue stream for it can support the work.

And with uncertainty about just when the DCU Center will be able to host events again, that makes the timeline for the project quite uncertain itself.

The Civic Center Commission has approved improvements for the DCU Center totaling $21.5 million. They are broken down into five priority areas: life safety and code compliance, deferred maintenance, public accommodations, revenue enhancements, and other enhancements/upgrades.

To finance building improvements, the city created a special DCU Finance District in 2006 that consisted of four parcels: the Hilton Garden Inn, the Residence by Marriott on Plantation Street, the DCU Center arena and convention center, and the Major Taylor Boulevard parking garage, including its retail space and operations.

In 2016 the district was expanded to include additional parcels.

Certain tax revenues generated in that district and collected by the state — hotel, meals and sales taxes — are redirected back to the city to finance the bonds for improvements in and around the DCU Center.

But when the COVID-19 pandemic forced the closing of the DCU Center in mid-March and

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City of Longmont Ballot Question 3C: Water system improvements bonds

What it asks: Shall the City of Longmont be authorized to borrow up to $80,000,000 for the purpose of financing water system improvements, including but not limited to the Nelson Flanders Water Treatment Plant Expansion Project and replacement of aging water system infrastructure like treated water storage and raw and treated water transmission lines; and shall the borrowing be evidenced by bonds, loan agreements, or other financial obligations payable solely from the City’s water utility enterprise revenues and be issued at one time or in multiple series at a price above, below or equal to the principal amount of such borrowing and with such terms and conditions, including provisions for redemption prior to maturity with or without payment of premium, as the City may determine?

What it means: Longmont is asking voters’ authorization to sell up to $80 million in bonds — backed by a five-year schedule of water rates City Council has already approved, are already in place and that will remain in place regardless of the outcome of the vote on this ballot question — to finance a variety of improvements to the city’s system of delivering raw water to its treatment plant, expanding that treatment plant, improving treated-water storage facilities and the system for transmitting treated water to homes and businesses.

What supporters say: Using bonding and debt servicing spreads out the cost of needed infrastructure improvements over time to avoid rate spikes, which keeps rates more predictable for users. Bond financing results in user rates that are initially lower than if cash were used to fund the improvements and distributes costs more equitably across both current and future residents. Bond financing allows the City of Longmont’s Water Utility to make improvements in the near future, rather than waiting until funds become available. Many of these improvements

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