Clients

SJC: Newton home contractor who is Level 3 sex offender does not have to list clients’ addresses

“The defendant … is not an employee but an independent contractor, and publishing his clients’ addresses as though his clients were his employers would mischaracterize the relationship,” Gants wrote.

The SJC ruling was sought by Francis X. Harding Jr. a self-employed home contractor whom the Sex Offender Registry Board has classified as a Level 3 sex offender, the most likely to reoffend.

According to the SJC, Harding pleaded guilty in 2015 to charges of indecent assault and battery on a child under 14 and possession of child pornography and was sentenced to five years of probation among other sanctions in Fall River District Court.

He was required to register as a sex offender and in the years since has listed his Newton home — where he has a workshop — as both his work and home address with the board, the SJC said.

The self-employed contractor has also regularly shared detailed invoices about the homes or businesses where he had worked with probation officers and was considered to be in compliance with his sentence, the SJC said.

But in March 2018, a Revere police officer spotted Harding at a shopping plaza where the officer was conducting a drug investigation, stopped him, and learned he was working at a house in Lynn repairing gutters, the SJC said.

Lynn police confirmed the information and also confirmed an infant child lived there – Harding was barred from working “with’ children under his sentence – leading District Court Judge Cynthia M. Brackett to find that Harding violated his probation.

Harding appealed, drawing support from the Committee for Public Counsel Services and the non-profit Massachusetts Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers.

They jointly argued sex offenders already face major problems getting work and the public disclosure would drive drive away potential customers. Steady employment,

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A secretive company that’s worked with Airbnb, Amazon, and Apple reportedly has a history of charging contractors to work for its corporate clients



a man sitting in front of a computer: A man works at a computer with a headset. Badias/Andia/Universal Images Group via Getty Images


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A man works at a computer with a headset. Badias/Andia/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

  • A customer service firm used by the likes of Apple, Amazon, Airbnb, and more has a history of exploiting the remote gig workers it recruits, according to a new ProPublica report.
  • Arise Virtual Solutions, which serves as a contractor to staff customer support teams, has seen booming business during the pandemic as it allows large corporations to easily hire and fire the people it contracts.
  • The report paints yet another picture of how workers in the gig economy are left vulnerable to exploitation.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A customer service firm hired by the likes of Airbnb, Amazon, Apple, and Disney has seen a burgeoning business during the pandemic. But the 25-year-old firm also has a history of worker exploitation, according to a new ProPublica report.

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Arise Virtual Solutions acts as a middleman between gig workers — who, ProPublica reports, are mostly women and people of color — and big companies, pairing the remote customer service workers with large corporate clients. Arise’s clientele includes Amazon, Apple, AT&T, Disney, eBay, Peloton, Virgin Atlantic, and many others, according to the outlet.

The corporations are drawn to Arise’s services in part because of how quickly the firm can hire workers, the report notes. But Arise can also easily fire those customer service agents, without severance or insurance, in what is another example of how rampant worker vulnerability and exploitation can be in the gig economy.

Arise has been hit with federal class-action lawsuits since 2011, with workers alleging federal labor law violations and wrongful treatment of employees. ProPublica viewed hearings, internal documents, corporate contracts, and other records, as well as spoke with multiple agents for its investigation.

The

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Stretch your imagination: High Country architects bring clients’ ideas and inspirations to life

The ‘Fly Barn’ is an intimate structure adjacent to the main house, wherein the fly-fishing contingent store their fly rods, vests and drift boat, as well as sit at the bench tying flies and regale each other with fish stories.
Photo courtesy Shepherd Resources Inc.

Everyone has their own ideas about what makes a home truly stand apart from the rest, but sometimes, it takes a little inspiration from others to get those creative juices really flowing. Homeowners curate ideas from all kinds of sources — from magazines to favorite vacation memories — and experienced architects bring those visions to life. Here are several examples of cool home elements to get your motor running.

Lighting it up

Doug DeChant and his associates at Shepherd Resources Inc. believe that light is central to any good design, be it light of the sun, moon or fire.

Whether it’s an indoor fireplace or outdoor firepit, mesmerizing flames go a long way in adding ambiance. Adam Harrison, principal at Shepherd Resources, worked with a client who wanted a 1950s to 1960s lodge with a contemporary twist.

Since fireplaces were always a significant feature of lodges and cabins, Harrison placed a gas fireplace in the middle of the open floor plan. But this isn’t just any fireplace: its long, black steel hood hovers from the ceiling, supported by a truss system so no legs reach to the floor. Of course, such an intriguing element required a unique fire element, so rather than a regular metal log set, Harrison contracted Brooklyn artist Elena Columbo to fashion stainless steel rods to “fuel” the fire.

Recalling the ‘60s, this metal flue element is fully suspended over the primary fireplace, supported by intersecting steel beams. Appropriately, the husband plays folk guitar in the fire’s glow.
Photo courtesy Shepherd Resources
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Home Building Contractors – Why Do My Clients Hate Me?

Most Building Contractors I know get it wrong. They place their priorities on the project, rather than on their clients.

 

Why is that? As simple as it seems to say that the customer comes first, in home building, it’s not an easy task. I can definitely empathize with the builder. The more complicated and personal a provided service is the greater the risk that clients will become confused, emotional, and eventually accusatory.

 

A Home Builder or Baby Sitter?

 

A complaint I often hear is that builders want to be builders, not baby sitters. Builders want to do what they do best … build! Isn’t that the job after all? And by doing their best to build a beautiful home, won’t that satisfy the customer? Whether or not that makes sense, the fact is, it usually doesn’t work.

 

The reason many builders think like this is they learn their building craft and rarely do they learn the “people craft”. And when people are treated like they need to be baby sat, they’re eventually going to cry like babies … and hate their “parents”.

 

Use These Three Problems and Alternate Strategies to help you craft a better approach to your business and turn “hate relationships” into love affairs.

 

PROBLEM: Traditional General Contracting promotes an imbalance of power that lacks respect for the client. The contractor is perceived to be calling all the shots.

 

STRATEGY: The client becomes an Owner Builder and the Builder becomes the Coach. This serves to level the playing field, put more power in the hands of the client and the relationship has an “even keel” feel.

 

PROBLEM: There’s often very little effective communication between the builder and the clients.

 

STRATEGY: Preset communication schedules so that …

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