color

How to Choose a Paint Color

If you’ve ever tried to pick a paint color for your home, you know that it can be a maddeningly difficult task, even for the most decisive among us. Whether you’re looking for the perfect shade of white (warm or cool? Matte or eggshell?) or the right inky blue (green or purple undertones? Too dark or not dark enough?), there are—quite literally—infinite options to choose from. Before you head to the paint store—and definitely before you think about buying a few gallons of actual paint—check out designer and stylist Faith Blakeney’s tips for how to navigate the color process.

choosing paint color

1. Gather the top contenders—and then add a few more.

    This goes without saying, but you should always see paint colors IRL—what looks like a soft gray in that photo you saved from Pinterest might actually be closer to pale lavender in your space. Head to the paint store and grab some chips before you get your heart set on any one color. While you’re at there, take a few lighter and darker options, too; you never know how the light in your own home will affect what you see in the store.

    choosing paint

    2. Look at swatches in different settings.

      Seeing a paint chip flat on a table is very different from seeing it on the wall. Hold them up vertically to get a better idea of what the color will look like, and move them around the room—colors can shift drastically depending on how much light and shadow the area gets.

      paint colors

      3. DIY moveable wall samples using adhesive sheets.

        Self-Adhesive Laminating Sheets

        Paint chips and fan decks are a helpful starting point, but a one-inch swatch isn’t going to give you the full picture—that’s why actually seeing large samples on your walls is so crucial. If you don’t want to

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        bette individualizes architectural bathroom components with color

        calling all individualists! leading german bathroom specialist bette turns the bathroom into an interior space for unique chromatic expression.

         

         

         

        so long as it’s black.

         

        the godfather of standardized production, henry ford, famously extended his zealous drive for optimization to the realm of taste, offering customers of his model T automobile zero choice in terms of color.

         

        from our 21st-century perspective, this might smack of hubris, but the patrician-like pioneer of assembly-line manufacturing saw it differently. ‘standardization means nothing unless it means standardizing upward,’ he is also quoted as saying.

         

        but how we design, how we manufacture, and how we consume has clearly changed.

        bette individualizes architectural bathroom components with color

         

         

         

        the rise of the individual, as opposed to the collective, and how this is played out in the material world around us, has meant the increased proliferation and significance of color in our daily lives. we now have a greater understanding of the emotional and psychological effects that the chromatic wields, whether we are, in the moment, consciously aware of them or not.

         

        within the interior landscape that is the bathroom, the past few decades have been dominated by one particular chromatic expression – white.

         

        while the 1970s saw a maximalist deployment of color in bathrooms, in particular in the form of browns and greens (the infamous avocado suite), the years that followed were dominated by white as the universal hue for sanitary products. here, a metaphoric purity in terms of aesthetics was mapped onto the notion of actual purity, white being associated traditionally with hygiene. think hospitals.

        bette individualizes architectural bathroom components with color

         

         

        german bathroom specialist bette has long ploughed its own innovative furrow. while others have explored the various formal possibilities and material limits of ceramic, the family-run manufacturer, in business since 1952, has never departed from its materials of choice and expertise – steel-titanium alloy

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        Moderna vaccine trial contractors fail to enroll enough people of color, prompting slowdown

        CHICAGO – Private contractors hired by Moderna Inc. to recruit volunteers for its coronavirus vaccine trial failed to enroll enough Black, Latino and Native American participants to determine how well the vaccine works in these populations, company executives and vaccine researchers told Reuters.

        To make up for the shortfall, Moderna slowed enrollment of its late-stage trial and instructed research centers to focus on increasing participation among minority volunteers, the company said. The effort is being bolstered by academic researchers who have longstanding relationships with organizations in Black and other minority communities.

        Five investigators working on the Moderna trial said in interviews that commercial site investigators quickly filled a large portion of the 30,000-person study with mostly white volunteers.

        But COVID-19 infects Blacks in the United States at nearly three times the rate of white Americans, and they are twice as likely to die from the virus, according to a report by the National Urban League and other studies.

        And communities of color count prominently among healthcare workers and populations at high risk of COVID-19 complications, making them among the first likely to be eligible for a new vaccine, experts said.

        Dr. Paul Evans, chief executive of Velocity Clinical Research in Durham, North Carolina, whose company was hired to test the Moderna vaccine at five sites, said efforts to enroll volunteers from diverse backgrounds to provide proper population balance is “notoriously difficult” in any clinical trial.

        “If there’s a problem with recruiting minorities, and there is, you can’t fix that overnight,” he said.

        Black Americans made up only about 7 percent of the trial as of Sept. 17. That should be closer to 13 percent to reflect the actual U.S. population.

        During the last two weeks of September, Moderna said it increased the proportion of Black enrollment, but declined to provide

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        Banner Construction: This Is A Good Time To Have Hardie Siding Color Plus Installed – Press Release

        James Hardie Siding

        St. Louis, Missouri based Banner Construction is reaching out to share that this is the best time for homeowners to carry out any siding installation projects they have in mind. The contractor has a wealth of experience in the industry, and they are always eager to share the benefit of their expertise with their community.

        Jessica Benbow of Banner Construction states, “If you are thinking about having James Hardie siding installed in your house, this time of the year is the best to get it scheduled. You get to avoid the long waiting times, as we are not too busy, as well as the cold winter weather. Your house will be in prime condition by the time the holidays roll around, giving it an outstanding, beautiful look that will increase its curb appeal.”

        While most choose to install new siding for aesthetic reasons, the local contractors state that there are several other considerations that homeowners make when they decide they wish to replace a house’s siding. Being able to understand what one can get out of such an endeavor is important, for instance, and a crucial part of the success of an exterior remodeling project.

        “When you install new siding, you are effectively protecting your home against certain weather conditions that can damage it over the years,” states Benbow. While this is a significant investment, it can end up saving homeowners a significant amount of money in the years to come.

        She continues, “If you select the right material, your siding can last for a long time and save you thousands of dollars in repairs and maintenance — as long as it is installed properly. Premium siding can dramatically reduce your home maintenance, allowing you to spend your leisure time in better ways. The peace of mind that you get

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        Bone Simple Design’s Long Island City Studio Is Swimming in Color (And Bright Lighting Ideas)

        colorful linene shadesPin It
        Photography by Dana Gallagher

        The 100-year-old industrial building in Long Island City that’s now home to lighting studio Bone Simple Design has a serendipitous pedigree. It was formerly the place where luxury fabric house Scalamandré dyed its textiles. “It’s bizarre but amazing that we’re doing the same thing in the space today,” says Chad Jacobs, Bone Simple’s founder and designer. 

        Dip-dyeing and painting large rope pendants and using shibori-inspired methods to spice up plain linen shades is a fairly new venture for Jacobs, who began producing his line of custom lighting in 1993. This winter, before shutting down work for a month due to COVID-19, he completed 15 five-foot-tall string fixtures for a hotel in the Bahamas by MR Architecture. The cord was plunged into a vat of golden yellow dye before completion. “For me, lighting is obviously about light, but it’s also about texture,” says Jacobs. “I’m not a big fan of the bare bulb look.” Ahead, the designer gives us a peek behind the scenes and reveals how he’s been making a splash this year with color. 

        white cage pendantPin It
        Photography by Dana Gallagher

        In the 5,000-square-foot, first-floor space, Jacobs is joined by seven employees, most of whom come from art backgrounds. Together they work on everything by hand, with the exception of the metal plating and powder-coated frames. When Jacobs originally moved into the studio, he specified to the building where to place the junction boxes so he could suspend the fixtures all over the place. Most are operable so that the team has a bright spot to work; others, like the massive hanging white cage pendant lamp (pictured above), are on display for visiting clients.

        In this scenario, the dramatic piece hangs extra low to the ground so you can really get a sense of its impressive dome shape.

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