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Lowe’s NFL “Home Team Roster” Is Doing Amazing Community Service Projects Across the Country

Lowe’s

During these tough times of the coronavirus pandemic, we’ve been amazed at how many people—celebrities and regular folks alike—have devoted themselves to helping those in need. Now, we’re happy to hear this piece of feel-good news from Lowe’s, the home improvement store, which has just launched the “Home Team Roster,” a lineup of players from all 32 NFL teams working on various community impact projects in their respective NFL hometowns.

For the partnership, each player will volunteer on a project ranging from affordable housing repairs and small business support to veterans’ outreach and disaster recovery. Lamar Jackson, Baltimore Ravens’ quarterback and 2019 NFL MVP, is serving as “captain” for Lowe’s Home Team, and is very much looking forward to making a difference in Charm City.

For his specific project, the star quarterback will work with Lowe’s and Baltimore’s Southwest Partnership to help with the opening of the United Way Family Center in Poppleton at Excel Academy. The center provides quality early childhood education and daycare, as well as support for student parents. The United Way Family Center is part of Lowe’s broader commitment to support housing and workforce needs in Southwest Baltimore.

“It’s important for me to be able to give back to the community and support the people that have supported me,” Jackson said in a Lowe’s press release. “Being a part of the Lowe’s Home Team is special for me because it gives me the chance to bring people together and give back.” The soon-to-open family center is pictured below, and we’re hopeful it will be a very special addition to the community.

Julie Filderman (United Way of Central Maryland)

Julie Filderman (United Way of Central Maryland)

The Home Team roster also includes fellow ‘co-captain’ Carolina Panthers’ Christian McCaffrey, Pittsburgh Steelers’ James Conner, Atlanta Falcons’ Calvin Ridley,

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Glass Fire engulfs over 60,000 acres of Wine Country, chars more homes



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Glass Fire rips through more of Wine Country Thursday night

Firefighters stood guard outside some of the country’s most renowned vineyards and the homes that surround them Thursday night as the Glass Fire continued to encroach on the communities of Calistoga and St. Helena — the heart of California’s famed Wine Country.

The blaze had engulfed 60,148 acres by Friday morning, burning most actively in the hills north of Calistoga and east of St. Helena. At least one home outside St. Helena was among the 220 residences to have burned down. A house on the 1300 block of Tucker Road was “fully involved,” late Thursday night according to Cal Fire, and had flames jetting out windows of both its two stories.

  • CALISTOGA, CA – OCTOBER 2: Firefighters battle a fire at a home along Tucker Road in Calistoga, Calif., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. The Glass Fire, already the fifth largest of the 23 major fires burning in the state, has engulfed 58,880 acres in the North Bay and damaged or destroyed nearly 400 buildings. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)

  • CALISTOGA, CA – OCTOBER 2: Firefighters battle a fire at a home along Tucker Road in Calistoga, Calif., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. The Glass Fire, already the fifth largest of the 23 major fires burning in the state, has engulfed 58,880 acres in the North Bay and damaged or destroyed nearly 400 buildings. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)

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  • CALISTOGA, CA – OCTOBER 2: A home along Tucker Road burns in Calistoga, Calif., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. The Glass Fire, already the fifth largest of the 23 major fires burning in the state, has engulfed 58,880 acres in the North Bay and damaged or destroyed nearly 400 buildings. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)

  • CALISTOGA, CA – OCTOBER 2: Firefighters battle a fire

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Stretch your imagination: High Country architects bring clients’ ideas and inspirations to life

The ‘Fly Barn’ is an intimate structure adjacent to the main house, wherein the fly-fishing contingent store their fly rods, vests and drift boat, as well as sit at the bench tying flies and regale each other with fish stories.
Photo courtesy Shepherd Resources Inc.

Everyone has their own ideas about what makes a home truly stand apart from the rest, but sometimes, it takes a little inspiration from others to get those creative juices really flowing. Homeowners curate ideas from all kinds of sources — from magazines to favorite vacation memories — and experienced architects bring those visions to life. Here are several examples of cool home elements to get your motor running.

Lighting it up

Doug DeChant and his associates at Shepherd Resources Inc. believe that light is central to any good design, be it light of the sun, moon or fire.

Whether it’s an indoor fireplace or outdoor firepit, mesmerizing flames go a long way in adding ambiance. Adam Harrison, principal at Shepherd Resources, worked with a client who wanted a 1950s to 1960s lodge with a contemporary twist.

Since fireplaces were always a significant feature of lodges and cabins, Harrison placed a gas fireplace in the middle of the open floor plan. But this isn’t just any fireplace: its long, black steel hood hovers from the ceiling, supported by a truss system so no legs reach to the floor. Of course, such an intriguing element required a unique fire element, so rather than a regular metal log set, Harrison contracted Brooklyn artist Elena Columbo to fashion stainless steel rods to “fuel” the fire.

Recalling the ‘60s, this metal flue element is fully suspended over the primary fireplace, supported by intersecting steel beams. Appropriately, the husband plays folk guitar in the fire’s glow.
Photo courtesy Shepherd Resources
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New wildfires in the Napa-Sonoma wine country force nearly 70,000 to flee homes

SAN FRANCISCO — Northern California’s wine country was on fire again Monday as strong winds fanned flames in the already scorched region, destroying homes and prompting overnight evacuation orders involving nearly 70,000 people. Meanwhile, three people died in a separate fire further north in the state.

Residents of the Oakmont Gardens senior living facility in Santa Rosa boarded brightly lit city buses, some wearing bathrobes and using walkers. They wore masks to protect against the coronavirus as orange flames marked the dark sky.

The fire threat forced Adventist Health St. Helena hospital to suspend care and transfer all patients elsewhere.

The fires that began Sunday in the famed Napa-Sonoma wine country about 45 miles north of San Francisco came as the region nears the third anniversary of deadly wildfires that erupted in 2017, including one that killed 22 people. Just a month ago, many of those same residents were evacuated from the path of a lightning-sparked fire that became the fourth-largest in state history.

“Our firefighters have not had much of a break, and these residents have not had much of a break,” said Daniel Berlant, assistant deputy director with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, known as Cal Fire.

Sonoma County Supervisor Susan Gorin evacuated her home in the Oakmont community of Santa Rosa about 1 a.m. She is rebuilding a home damaged in the 2017 fires. Gorin told the San Francisco Chronicle that she is numb, and the situation feels surreal.

“It’s like God has no sympathy, no empathy for Sonoma County,” she said.

More than 68,000 people in Sonoma and Napa counties have been evacuated in the latest inferno, one of 27 major fire clusters burning across the state, said Berlant. Many more residents have been warned that they might have to flee, even though

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