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U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google bid to end Oracle copyright suit

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle Corp accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

FILE PHOTO: The U.S. Supreme Court is seen through the U.S. Capitol columns in Washington, U.S. September 29, 2020. REUTERS/Erin Scott/File Photo

The shorthanded court, down one justice following last month’s death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google’s inclusion of Oracle’s software code in Android was not permissible under U.S. copyright law.

Oracle accused Google of copying thousands of lines of computer code from its popular Java programming language without a license in order to make Android, a competing platform that has harmed Oracle’s business.

Google lawyer Thomas Goldstein told the justices that the disputed Java code should not receive copyright protection because it was the “the only way” to create new programs using the programming language.

“The language only permits us to use those,” Goldstein said.

Chief Justice John Roberts suggested Google still should have paid Oracle for a license to Java.

“Cracking the safe may be the only way to get the money that you

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U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google bid to end Oracle …

(Adds end of arguments, fresh quotes from justices)

By Jan Wolfe and Andrew Chung

WASHINGTON, Oct 7 (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle Corp accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google’s inclusion of Oracle’s software code in Android was not permissible under U.S. copyright law.

Oracle accused Google of copying thousands of lines of computer code from its popular Java programming language without a license in order to make Android, a competing platform that has harmed Oracle’s business.

Google lawyer Thomas Goldstein told the court that the disputed Java code should not receive copyright protection because it was the “the only way” to create new programs using the programming language.

“The language only permits us to use those,” Goldstein said.

But Chief Justice John Roberts suggested Google still should have paid Oracle for a license to Java.

“Cracking the safe may be the only way to get the money that you want, but that doesn’t mean you can do it,”

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Supreme Court divided over Google bid to end Oracle copyright suit

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc’s <GOOGL.O> Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle Corp <ORCL.N> accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google’s inclusion of Oracle’s software code in Android was not permissible under U.S. copyright law.

Oracle accused Google of copying thousands of lines of computer code from its popular Java programming language without a license in order to make Android, a competing platform that has harmed Oracle’s business.

Google lawyer Thomas Goldstein told the court that the disputed Java code should not receive copyright protection because it was the “the only way” to create new programs using the programming language.

“The language only permits us to use those,” Goldstein said.

But Chief Justice John Roberts suggested Google still should have paid Oracle for a license to Java.

“Cracking the safe may be the only way to get the money that you want, but that doesn’t mean

Continue Reading

Google Pixel 4a receives auto-brightness and touch-sensitivity improvements via update

Google Pixel 4a receives auto-brightness and touch-sensitivity improvements via update

07 Oct 2020: Google Pixel 4a receives auto-brightness and touch-sensitivity improvements via update

Google has started rolling out a new update for the Pixel 4a, bringing a host of bug fixes and improvements to the recently-launched mid-ranger.

As per the changelog, the firmware improves the auto-rotation feature, auto-brightness response, and the touch sensitivity on the device.

It also addresses the issue in which devices get stuck during boot, and bumps the Android security patch to October 2020.

Fact: Details about the update

The update carries build number RP1A.201005.006 and is being rolled out in a phased manner via over-the-air method. Users will receive a notification once it becomes available on their device. To manually check the update, you can go to Settings >System Updates.

Design and Display: Google Pixel 4a: At a glance

As far as its specifications are concerned, the Google Pixel 4a features a plastic body with slim bezels and a punch-hole design to house the selfie snapper. On the rear, it packs a single camera and a physical fingerprint reader.

The smartphone bears a 5.81-inch Full-HD+ (1080×2340 pixels) OLED screen with a 60Hz refresh rate and a 19.5:9 aspect ratio.

Fact: For the shutterbugs and selfie lovers

The Pixel 4a sports a single 12.2MP (f/1.7, OIS) rear camera with an LED flash. On the front, it packs a single 8MP (f/2.0) snapper. The rear unit can shoot 4K videos at 30fps while the front camera can record 1080p videos at 30fps.

Internals: Under the hood

The Pixel 4a is powered by an octa-core Snapdragon 730G processor, paired with 6GB of RAM and 128GB of storage.

Under the hood, it runs on Android 11 and packs a 3,140mAh battery with 18W fast-charging support.

On the connectivity front,

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What is Google Guaranteed? | TechRadar

Google is rolling out a new feature for small businesses: the Google Guarantee badge certification.

For a monthly fee of $50, this certification will position your business as an upgraded profile within the Google My Business (GMB) dashboard. After passing a qualification and screening process, a “Google Guarantee” badge will appear on your GMB profile and potentially on listings that appear in the Local Pack.

But is Google Guarantee worth the $50 price tag? Here’s a rundown of the program’s pros and cons.

About the author

Madelyn Wing is Director of Product and Customer Marketing at CallRail

How it works

Most marketers are already familiar with Google’s Local Services Ads (LSA), which generate leads for local businesses through paid search. The Google Guarantee badge is a similar program for organic.

If a business subscribes to the program, any services booked through Google Local Services will be insured up to a lifetime cap of $2,000 USD or CAD. If a customer is dissatisfied with a provider’s service, they can claim the amount on the job invoice.

Google Guarantee’s flat-rate payment model is a new frontier for the tech giant. This rollout is only Google’s second subscription-based service. But while this program continues to be an experiment, it’s a bit more stable than an Area 120 project like Calljoy. Expect it to stick around for a while.

How it benefits customers

For customers, Google Guarantee whittles down the local competition by building trust. Think back to the last time you hired a handyman or other contractor. Maybe you looked on Yelp, searched Google or asked for recommendations in a local Facebook Group.

Your search likely turned up many promising listings without a website or a storefront. The GMB listing may include no more than a phone number and a name, or at

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