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What’s behind the badge that powers Google’s local trust layer?

What’s behind the badge that powers Google’s local trust layer?







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‘The work we have been doing is transferred to Poland’: American Google’s contractors

Contractors employed by an external company to work at Google signal that they are no longer getting orders and their work is taken over by the company’s branch in Kraków. They claim that jobs have started to be moved to Poland because they wanted to create a trade union,as the American portal Vice informs. 

In September 2019, most of the 80 Pittsburgh contractors employed by HCL America voted to join another union – steelworkers. They were to work together under the name of the Pittsburgh Association of Tech Professionals. Now they claim that the duties they performed for Google are transferred to the company’s branch in Poland, specifically in Kraków, while the team in Pittsburgh is shrinking.

They were not hired to work for the technology giant, but by the aforementioned HCL America, for which – according to Vice – the union plans of contractors were a problem.

On Thursday, the US National Labor Relations Board, a federal agency that protects the rights of private sector workers, issued a formal complaint against HCL. It accuses the management of this company, that they interviewed employees about other people’s union activities, “threatened employees with stricter rules and policies” if they voted for the union and announced delays in granting promotions and raises, Vice reads.

(Business Insider) 

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U.S. Supreme Court divided over Google’s bid to end Oracle’s Android copyright lawsuit

(Reuters) — The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following last month’s death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google’s inclusion of Oracle’s software code in Android was not permissible under U.S. copyright law.

Oracle accused Google of copying thousands of lines of computer code from its popular Java programming language without a license in order to make Android, a competing platform that has harmed Oracle’s business.

Google lawyer Thomas Goldstein told the justices that the disputed Java code should not receive copyright protection because it was the “the only way” to create new programs using the programming language.

“The language only permits us to use those,” Goldstein said.

Chief Justice John Roberts suggested Google still should have paid Oracle for a license to Java.

“Cracking the safe may be the only way to get the money that you want, but that doesn’t mean you can do it,” Roberts said.

Justice Neil Gorsuch questioned Goldstein on whether Google had simply piggybacked on Oracle’s innovation.

Gorsuch asked,

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Supreme Court Hears Google’s Appeal of Oracle’s $8 Billion Copyright Claim

The U.S. Supreme Court appeared divided on Wednesday as it considered whether to protect Alphabet Inc.’s Google from a long-running lawsuit by Oracle Corp. accusing it of infringing Oracle copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world’s smartphones.

The shorthanded court, down one justice following the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month, heard oral arguments in Google’s appeal of a lower court ruling reviving the lawsuit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages.

Some of the eight justices expressed concern that Google simply copied Oracle’s software code instead of innovating and creating its own for mobile devices. Others emphasized that siding with Oracle could give software developers too much power with potentially harmful effects on the technology industry.

A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google’s inclusion of Oracle’s software code in Android was not permissible under U.S. copyright law.

Oracle accused Google of copying thousands of lines of computer code from its popular Java programming language without a license in order to make Android, a competing platform that has harmed Oracle’s business.

Google lawyer Thomas Goldstein told the court that the disputed Java code should not receive copyright protection because it was the “the only way” to create new programs using the programming language.

“The language only permits us to use those,” Goldstein said.

But Chief Justice John Roberts suggested Google still should have paid Oracle for a license to Java.

“Cracking the safe may be the only way to get the money that you want, but that doesn’t mean you can do it,” Roberts said.

Justice Neil Gorsuch questioned Goldstein on whether Google had simply piggybacked on Oracle’s innovation.

Gorsuch asked, “What

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Google’s Pixel 5 costs $699 and packs major camera improvements

Tuning into hardware events these days feels like a surprise party someone has spoiled for you — fun, but you know what’s going to happen. So today, after endless leaks and rumors, Google today announced the Pixel 5. It costs $699 and will be available starting October 15.

At first glance, the Pixel 5 looks a whole lot like the Pixel 4, at least from the rear. This time around, however, there is only one size of the model (with a 6.0″ display), and Google has abandoned the radar-based gesture and facial recognition system, opting for a fingerprint reader on the rear instead.

This isn’t a flagship in the traditional sense.

For the first time since the inception of the Pixel line, Google isn’t using for the most powerful Qualcomm processor, but rather the increasingly popular Snapdragon 765G. That means the Pixel 5 is technically weaker than the Pixel 4 in terms of raw processing performance.

While that’s sure to annoy some tech enthusiasts, let’s face it: Google’s phones have never been about the hardware. Whether because it doesn’t have the same access as established hardware companies like Samsung or because it actively chose to prioritize software, the company has consistently lagged behind the competition when it comes to raw specs on its flagships.

But after years of reviewing phones, I’m well aware of how poor a predictor processor choice can be; I’ve found the OnePlus Nord to run smoother than my Pixel 4XL, despite the latter having the more powerful processor. Hopefully opting for a weaker processor means Google has doubled down on software optimization.

RAM and storage, at least, are still decently up to par, at 8GB and 128GB, respectively. Perhaps more importantly, the battery is pegged at 4,080 mAh, which should translate to oodles of battery longevity

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