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After White Hall case, nursing homes remain key in controlling covid

As covid-19 numbers continue to rise throughout Arkansas and Jefferson County, protecting one of the most vulnerable populations has become a priority on the state level. Nursing home residents were hit hard in the state of Arkansas at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. The first nursing home case was reported by the Arkansas Department of Health on March 25 and was associated with the Waters of White Hall.

Health officials announced that the initial case at The Waters of White Hall appeared to be associated with a case linked to the original cluster at Jefferson Regional Medical Center.

Since then, the nursing home has had 51 positive residents with the most recent one reported to the health department on Oct. 1. Sixteen residents total were also reported as deceased.

In a previous interview, Donna Morton, the facility’s administrator, released a statement describing The Waters of White Hall’s “aggressive and proactive approach” against the coronavirus through “intense” methods including “monitoring, screening, education and awareness and appropriate prevention and management.”

Efforts to contact Morton on Monday were unsuccessful, but Monday’s report released by the Arkansas Department of Health showed the health care facility has 34 residents who have recovered.

Posts on their social media page pictured residents who had defeated covid-19, calling them the “true heroes.”

On Mar. 13, the Department of Health issued a directive temporarily suspending visitation to nursing homes in Arkansas to reduce the spread of the virus. The directive prohibited all visitation at long-term care facilities unless medically necessary by law enforcement or emergency personnel, a representative from the Department of Health, a representative from the Department of Human Services Office of Long-Term Care or a representative from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

In June the Department of Health allowed the facilities to reopen

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Barton Bendish village hall undergoes total renovation after it became ‘very tired’

A West Norfolk village hall is getting a massive revamp after ongoing issues included the floor starting to collapse.

Barton Bendish village hall is in the midst of building work as they spend hundreds of thousands of pounds on a total renovation, with support from a grant from the Freebridge Community Fund as well.

Chris Parsons, a trustee of the charity, said: “The village hall is really well used in this community and we suffered from a lack of capacity and also fairly poor performance of the building itself.

Barton Bendish Village Hall is being revamped. Picture: Freebridge
Barton Bendish Village Hall is being revamped. Picture: Freebridge

“There was no insulation, the heating caused a lot of problems, the floor itself started to collapse. It was getting very tired.”

Mr Parsons is an architect and designed the extension following a public consultation in which 100 per cent of respondents said they were in favour of work being carried out.



The trustee added: “People really wanted to keep the character of the existing building so we reused a lot of the original materials. We showed them two schemes – contemporary and traditional and the traditional option was chosen.”

The biggest change has been an extension to the side of the building which, as well as increasing the size of the hall, has also made the kitchen bigger. Improvements have been made to the disabled access as well.

Mr Parsons continued: “This is a very rural community and there are a lot of problems associated with rural isolation and loneliness – cultural isolation and social isolation in particular. And the trustees feel that the hall should be something that could help with these issues.

“There are lots of events that have used the hall in the past and we needed to ensure that those could continue, and if we could, offer

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City Hall Notebook: Timeline for DCU Center improvements up in the air – News – telegram.com

When the city hit the pause button back in the early spring on the planned Phase 2 master plan improvements for the DCU Center because of funding uncertainty resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, it was hoped it could be restarted in January.

Of course, no one back then foresaw that the city-owned DCU Center would remain closed seven months later. It is now expected to remain dark at least through the end of this year.

As a result, the possibility of a January restart for the project seems very much up in the air.

John Odell, the city’s director of energy and assets, told the Civic Center Commission last week that the restart will be determined when the revenue stream for it can support the work.

And with uncertainty about just when the DCU Center will be able to host events again, that makes the timeline for the project quite uncertain itself.

The Civic Center Commission has approved improvements for the DCU Center totaling $21.5 million. They are broken down into five priority areas: life safety and code compliance, deferred maintenance, public accommodations, revenue enhancements, and other enhancements/upgrades.

To finance building improvements, the city created a special DCU Finance District in 2006 that consisted of four parcels: the Hilton Garden Inn, the Residence by Marriott on Plantation Street, the DCU Center arena and convention center, and the Major Taylor Boulevard parking garage, including its retail space and operations.

In 2016 the district was expanded to include additional parcels.

Certain tax revenues generated in that district and collected by the state — hotel, meals and sales taxes — are redirected back to the city to finance the bonds for improvements in and around the DCU Center.

But when the COVID-19 pandemic forced the closing of the DCU Center in mid-March and

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This former Salvation Army hall has been converted into a stunning modern home

A former Salvation Army charity hall in Sydney’s inner west suburb of Leichhardt has been converted into a gorgeous modern home complete with cathedral ceilings, a resort-style bath and garden.

The shell of the 1916 building remains untouched in its original exterior form, while the interior has been entirely transformed and brought into 2020.

After entering through the 200-year-old Argentinian front door, guests are welcomed into the home with high cathedral ceilings, unique fixtures, engineered flooring and a relaxing garden at the back. 

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A former Salvation Army charity hall in Sydney's inner west suburb of Leichhardt has been converted into a gorgeous modern home

A former Salvation Army charity hall in Sydney’s inner west suburb of Leichhardt has been converted into a gorgeous modern home

The shell of the 1916 building seems to remain untouched in its original exterior form, while the interior has been entirely transformed and brought into 2020

The shell of the 1916 building seems to remain untouched in its original exterior form, while the interior has been entirely transformed and brought into 2020 

The newly renovated property is currently listed on the market for $4.2 million and is certainly unlike any other home in the inner west

The newly renovated property is currently listed on the market for $4.2 million and is certainly unlike any other home in the inner west

The current owners purchased the property from the Salvation Army 23 years ago in a run-down condition and decided a renovation was necessary.

The property is listed with Cobden & Hayson’s Ben Southwell and is located on 54-56 Carlisle Street – only six kilometres from Sydney’s CBD.

Mr Southwell said during the renovation the owners wanted to make sure the hall keeps its sense of character.

‘They wanted to do something sympathetic to the original design,’ he said.

‘Everything has been in such a way to ensure it takes nothing away from the hall like the extension, which blends effortlessly into the rest of the hall.’

The current owners purchased the property from the Salvation Army 23 years ago in a run-down condition and decided a renovation was necessary

The current owners purchased the property from the Salvation Army 23 years ago in a run-down condition and decided a renovation was necessary

The kitchen features a commercial gas stove, island bench and stunning stone benchtops along with unique recycled lighting and doors

The kitchen features a commercial gas stove, island bench and stunning stone benchtops

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$2.5 million renovation of PRCC’s Seal Hall to begin in December

HATTIESBURG, Miss. (WDAM) – One of the main academic buildings on the Poplarville campus of Pearl River Community College is about to get a major makeover.



a large brick building with grass in front of a house: A renovation of PRCC's Seal Hall will begin in December.


© Provided by Hattiesburg-Laurel WDAM-TV
A renovation of PRCC’s Seal Hall will begin in December.

Seal Hall, which was built in 1967, will be renovated, beginning in December.

It’s a $2.5 million project.

“(It) will include brand new classroom space, upgraded office space for our faculty, new lobbies, new entrance, it’s right in the heart of our campus and I think it’s going to be a great addition,” said Adam Breerwood, president of Pearl River Community College.

Meanwhile, PRCC just opened a new science building annex about six weeks ago.

It was part of a construction project that also involved the renovation of the college’s existing science building, which was built in 1966.

The total cost of that project was about $5 million.

“We really feel like this will provide the necessary tools for our faculty, staff and our students,” Breerwood said. “STEM education is big these days and we want to be able to provide the very best of that education.”

And, PRCC is wrapping up work on two new residence halls, located next to Dobie Holden Stadium.

Work began in the summer of 2019 is scheduled for completion in January.

The dorms will house 260 students.

“That’s 260 additional students on our campus, which will breathe a sense of fresh air, new life to our campus,” Breerwood said.

Breerwood also said that PRCC has had nine consecutive semesters of enrollment growth.

Copyright 2020 WDAM. All rights reserved.

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