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Which nursing homes had the most coronavirus deaths? N.J. will no longer tell you. Here’s the list.

Nothing captured the despair of the coronavirus outbreak in New Jersey like the Easter Sunday discovery of a makeshift morgue crammed with 17 bodies at one of the state’s largest nursing homes.

The virus rampaged through Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center last spring, killing 82 residents and two employees, one of the highest nursing home death tolls in the state.

Yet, the state Health Department’s “data dashboard,” the webpage that chronicles the pandemic’s ongoing toll in the Garden State, on Thursday listed no deaths at the Sussex County facility and just three COVID-19 cases.

In mid-July, state health officials made a decision to take down the total number of deaths at each nursing home, and instead started reporting only deaths and cases as they occurred during an active outbreak.

The only nursing homes, assisted living facilities and other long-term care facilities now listed on the dashboard are the 155 that were experiencing an outbreak as of Friday. It excludes information from more than 500 other licensed facilities in New Jersey that experienced COVID-related deaths, including the state-run veterans homes where combined almost 200 residents died.

New Jersey has the highest per capita death rate inside its long-term care facilities, according to the most recent data from U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The virus has killed 6,788 and 121 employees, according to state data.

Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli briefly announced the change at a July 10 coronavirus press conference, explaining that posting data on active outbreaks would provide a “clearer, real-time picture” of what is going on.

Knowing which facilities at one time had the highest number of cases and deaths may not give an accurate picture of the facility’s current safety, said Dawn Thomas, a state health department spokeswoman. Testing supplies were in short supply in the early

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Here’s Why Meritage Homes (MTH) is a Great Momentum Stock to Buy

Momentum investing is all about the idea of following a stock’s recent trend, which can be in either direction. In the ‘long’ context, investors will essentially be “buying high, but hoping to sell even higher.” And for investors following this methodology, taking advantage of trends in a stock’s price is key; once a stock establishes a course, it is more than likely to continue moving in that direction. The goal is that once a stock heads down a fixed path, it will lead to timely and profitable trades.

While many investors like to look for momentum in stocks, this can be very tough to define. There is a lot of debate surrounding which metrics are the best to focus on and which are poor quality indicators of future performance. The Zacks Momentum Style Score, part of the Zacks Style Scores, helps address this issue for us.

Below, we take a look at Meritage Homes (MTH), which currently has a Momentum Style Score of A. We also discuss some of the main drivers of the Momentum Style Score, like price change and earnings estimate revisions.

It’s also important to note that Style Scores work as a complement to the Zacks Rank, our stock rating system that has an impressive track record of outperformance. Meritage Homes currently has a Zacks Rank of #1 (Strong Buy). Our research shows that stocks rated Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy) and #2 (Buy) and Style Scores of A or B outperform the market over the following one-month period.

You can see the current list of Zacks #1 Rank Stocks here >>>

Set to Beat the Market?

Let’s discuss some of the components of the Momentum Style Score for MTH that show why this homebuilder shows promise as a solid momentum pick.

Looking at a stock’s short-term

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