Hotel

The Future of Hotel Design

At Virgin Hotels in Chicago, Dallas and Nashville, and coming to Las Vegas early next year, the company’s app was made more robust this year to control room lights, temperature and television. Room configurations separate the back bedroom from the dressing room near the hallway with a barn door behind which guests can remain, allowing attendants access to make deliveries without contact.

“We don’t make you sign the room-service check,” said Raul Leal, the chief executive of Virgin Hotels. “That’s an archaic accounting tool.”

Not every hotel can offer outdoor dining year-round. Neither can their restaurants thrive with the capacity restrictions forced by social distancing requirements. The solution: Make the entire hotel a dining area. And throw in robotic servers.

“This is meant to be an answer to how do you deconstruct the restaurant experience so you don’t have to eat in one small place,” said Ron Swidler, the chief innovation officer at The Gettys Group, a Chicago-based hotel design, development and consulting firm. The Gettys Group recently convened with a consortium of 325 industry professionals from Hilton, Marriott and Cornell University, among others, to come up with the Hotel of Tomorrow project, collaborating on future hotel innovations. (The company has a track record with the workshop; in the early 2000s, it came up with the idea of a robotic butler, later developed by the Aloft brand of hotels as the Botler).

The think tank envisioned delivery units of various sizes that could keep food hot and drinks cold and provide video or music for entertainment.

“Maybe these robots have personalities and hang out with you,” Mr. Swidler added.

Even without robot partygoers, existing hotels have a great incentive to repurpose their now underutilized meeting rooms, ballrooms and even event lawns.

“We’re thinking the whole

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On first anniversary of Hard Rock Hotel collapse, developer sues contractors, insurers | Courts

The company that owns the ill-fated Hard Rock Hotel in New Orleans filed suit this week against a host of construction contractors, subcontractors and insurance companies over the 2019 building collapse that killed three workers and injured dozens more.

The suit was filed in Orleans Parish Civil District Court late Monday, the first anniversary of the collapse of the upper floors of the 18-story building.



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The ownership group, 1031 Canal Development, is led by Mohan Kailas. But company officials have said principals of two of the project’s main contractors — Denzel Clark, owner of general contractor Citadel Builders, and Todd Trosclair, owner of electrical contractor All-Star Electric — also owned a share.

The development company blames the building’s failure on Citadel, All-Star, Heaslip Engineering, architect Harry Baker Smith and 15 other subcontractors. Because of the company’s contract with Citadel to build the hotel at Canal and North Rampart streets, it also sued the insurance providers of each contractor and subcontractor.

The lawsuit takes particular aim at Heaslip, whom investigators for the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration have cited for several key violations. The development company’s suit asserts that Heaslip failed to design the proper support beams and columns or to calculate the proper loads that each floor could support. It branches out from there to the lead contractor, Citadel, and the various trades subcontractors.

Nearly a year after the top floors of the Hard Rock Hotel collapsed, killing three workers, injuring 18 others and straining city resources, N…

“Just as Heaslip did not run appropriate load calculations and analyses, neither did the general contractor or any subcontractor or supplier,” 1031 Canal alleges.

The owners also blame steel subcontractor Hub Steel for the way it fabricated and installed beams and metal decking on the upper floors. Metal decking was used

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On one-year anniversary of Hard Rock Hotel collapse, developer sues host of contractors | News

The company that owns the ill-fated Hard Rock Hotel filed suit this week against a host of construction contractors, subcontractors and insurance companies for damages related to the collapse of the highrise last October that killed three workers and injured dozens more.

The legal action was filed in Orleans Parish Civil District Court late Monday, on the one-year anniversary of the collapse of the upper floors of the 18-story building.

The ownership group, 1031 Canal Development, is led by Mohan Kailas. But company officials have said principals of two of the project’s main contractors — Denzell Clark, owner of general contractor Citadel Builders and Todd Trosclair, owner of electrical contractor All-Star Electric — also owned a share.

1031 Canal places the blame for the building’s failure on Citadel, All-Star, Heaslip Engineering, architect Harry Baker Smith and 15 other subcontractors. Because of the group’s contract with Citadel to build the hotel at Canal and N. Rampart streets, it also sued the insurance providers of each contractor and subcontractor.

New Orleans sues owners of collapsed Hard Rock Hotel for $12M over cleanup, other costs

The lawsuit takes particularly pointed aim at Heaslip, which was cited for several key violations by investigators with the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration. It claims that Heaslip failed to design the proper support beams and columns or calculate the proper loads that each floor could support. It branches out from there to the lead contractor, Citadel, and the various trades subcontractors.

“Just as Heaslip did not run appropriate load calculations and analyses, neither did the general contractor, or any subcontractor or supplier,” the lawsuit alleges.



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Demi Searls, 7, and Harlo Cartozzo, 8, write notes to their uncle Anthony Floyd Magrette who died in the Hard Rock Hotel construction site collapse in New Orleans, Monday, Oct. 12,

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Downtown’s historic Hotel Paso del Norte opens after long-delayed renovation

After more than three years of a sometimes troubled, multimillion-dollar renovation, the 107-year-old Hotel Paso del Norte has opened.

Hotel Paso del Norte General Manager talks about the historic hotel’s renovation

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The 351-room, Marriott Autograph Collection hotel had been scheduled to reopen in 2018, but the project was delayed by construction problems and COVID-19 business restrictions.

The hotel opened at 11 a.m., Oct. 8.  A ribbon-cutting event is scheduled Oct. 15 at the hotel, located at South El Paso Street and San Antonio Avenue in Downtown.

“Once in a great while, you happen upon a place that captures time and everything that is good about life. That’s the feeling people (will) experience” at the hotel, Carlos Sarmiento, the hotel general manager, said in a statement.



a traffic light with a building in the background: The dome bar at the Hotel Paso del Norte retained the historic charm with updated, more modern decor.


© Mark Lambie / El Paso Times
The dome bar at the Hotel Paso del Norte retained the historic charm with updated, more modern decor.

More: Tarnished Downtown El Paso gem comes back to life at cost of over $100 million

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The hotel features the elegant Dome bar, with its 25-foot-wide, 107-year-old, stained-glass dome, a rooftop pool and bar on its 10th floor, the Sabor Mexican restaurant, the 1700º Steak House, and Dulce bakery cafe, according to a hotel press release. It has 33,000 square feet of ballrooms and other meeting spaces. And a virus-killing air-filtration system is installed throughout the hotel.

Room rates range from $204 to $290 per night, according to the Marriott hotel’s website.

More: T.J. Maxx, Marshalls operator to put $150M distribution center with 950 jobs in El Paso

Much of the hotel was designed by the late, iconic El Paso architect Henry Trost, who designed most of Downtown’s historic gems. A large addition was added

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Downtown’s historic Hotel Paso del Norte opens Thursday after long-delayed renovation

After more than three years of a sometimes troubled, multimillion-dollar renovation, the 107-year-old Hotel Paso del Norte opens Thursday, hotel officials announced.

The Plaza Hotel Pioneer Plaza grand opening

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The 351-room, Marriott Autograph Collection hotel had been scheduled to reopen in 2018, but the project was delayed by construction problems and COVID-19 business restrictions.

The hotel is scheduled to open at 11 a.m., Thursday. A ribbon-cutting event is scheduled Oct. 15 at the hotel, located at South El Paso Street and San Antonio Avenue in Downtown.

“Once in a great while, you happen upon a place that captures time and everything that is good about life. That’s the feeling people (will) experience” at the hotel, Carlos Sarmiento, the hotel general manager, said in a statement.

KEEP UP with El Paso development. Click here to subscribe.

The hotel features the elegant Dome bar, with its 25-foot-wide, 107-year-old, stained-glass dome, a rooftop pool and bar on its 10th floor, the Sabor Mexican restaurant, the 1700º Steak House, and Dulce bakery cafe, according to a hotel press release. It also has a 33,000 square-foot ballroom, and a virus-killing air-filtration system throughout the hotel.



a view of a large building: The renovated Hotel Paso del Norte features a 25-foot, stained-glass dome in its Dome bar. The 351-room hotel in Downtown El Paso is scheduled to open Oct. 8 after more than three years of renovation.


© COURTESY OF HOTEL PASO DEL NORTE
The renovated Hotel Paso del Norte features a 25-foot, stained-glass dome in its Dome bar. The 351-room hotel in Downtown El Paso is scheduled to open Oct. 8 after more than three years of renovation.

Room rates range from $204 to $290 per night, according to the Marriott hotel’s website.

More: T.J. Maxx, Marshalls operator to put $150M distribution center with 950 jobs in El Paso

Much of the hotel was designed by the late, iconic El Paso architect Henry Trost, who designed most of Downtown’s historic gems. A large addition was added in the 1980s.

The Meyers

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