Hotel

Waldorf Astoria Hotel auctions off 80,000 items ahead of renovation in New York

Dubbed the “unofficial palace,” the Waldorf has hosted the likes of Grace Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald and every US president from Herbert Hoover to Barack Obama. Some members of high society even lived at the hotel, including composer Cole Porter and the Duke of Windsor, Edward VIII, with his partner, Wallis Simpson, after he abdicated the British throne.
The Windsor Suite at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in NYC.
But now, the landmark hotel on Park Avenue is auctioning off 80,000 of its most timeless furnishings in preparation for a complete renovation, as part of the Fine Furnishings of the Historic Waldorf Astoria New York auction, according to a news release from Kaminski Auctions, which is hosting the sale.

“Many of the pieces for auction have been a witness to history, and we are excited to see them find new life in the homes of avid collectors,” said Andrew Miller, CEO of Dajia US, the owner and developer of Waldorf Astoria New York.

Anyone can now own classic 19th century French furniture from the Windsor Suite, the Cole Porter Suite, the Winston Churchill Suite and the Presidential Suite, among others. The furnishings include bespoke chandeliers, a Steinway grand piano and Charles X-style benches.

The Presidential Suite at the Waldorf Astorial Hotel in NYC.

Online bidding and personal viewings of the items at Silver City Galleria Mall in Massachusetts, where they’re being held, started Saturday. A two-week live and Covid-safe auction is scheduled to start October 17. The auction is set to end November 15, according to the news release.

All proceeds from the auction will go to the St. Bartholomew’s Conservancy to help restore the exteriors and gardens of St. Bartholomew’s Church and Community House, located across the street from the hotel, according to the news release.

The Waldorf Astoria started the construction in December 2017 as part of a major renovation. The hotel is expected to reopen in two
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New York’s historic Waldorf Astoria hotel auctions off 80,000 items ahead of complete renovation

Since it opened in 1931, the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York has been frequented by society’s elite: politicians, actors and even royalty.

Dubbed the “unofficial palace,” the Waldorf has hosted the likes of Grace Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald and every US president from Herbert Hoover to Barack Obama. Some members of high society even lived at the hotel, including composer Cole Porter and the Duke of Windsor, Edward VIII, with his partner, Wallis Simpson, after he abdicated the British throne.

But now, the landmark hotel on Park Avenue is auctioning off 80,000 of its most timeless furnishings in preparation for a complete renovation, as part of the Fine Furnishings of the Historic Waldorf Astoria New York auction, according to a news release from Kaminski Auctions, which is hosting the sale.

“Many of the pieces for auction have been a witness to history, and we are excited to see them find new life in the homes of avid collectors,” said Andrew Miller, CEO of Dajia US, the owner and developer of Waldorf Astoria New York.

Anyone can now own classic 19th century French furniture from the Windsor Suite, the Cole Porter Suite, the Winston Churchill Suite and the Presidential Suite, among others. The furnishings include bespoke chandeliers, a Steinway grand piano and Charles X-style benches.

Online bidding and personal viewings of the items at Silver City Galleria Mall in Massachusetts, where they’re being held, started Saturday. A two-week live and Covid-safe auction is scheduled to start October 17. The auction is set to end November 15, according to the news release.

All proceeds from the auction will go to the St. Bartholomew’s Conservancy to help restore the exteriors and gardens of St. Bartholomew’s Church and Community House, located across the street from the hotel, according to the news release.

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Historic mansion on Charleston’s Battery reopened as boutique hotel after renovation | Business

Throughout its history, the mansion at 20 South Battery has been known for its gatherings. Just last month, a historic marker was installed in front of it, naming it as the birthplace of the now 100-year-old Preservation Society

Founder Susan Pringle Frost hosted the organization’s first-ever meeting in the house in 1920. About 50 years before that, Colonel Lathers of the Union Army made the mansion a place where U.S. senators and New Yorkers met with locals.

Now-owner Dr. Jack Schaeffer, a native Charlestonian and part-time Sullivan’s Island resident, hopes the property’s reputation as a host will continue under his guidance. He’s just spent 18 months restoring the 1843 mansion after buying it in 2018. It was reopened as an 11-room boutique hotel on Sept. 10. 



Charleston preservation group closing in on goal for first capital campaign in 100 years

While the coronavirus pandemic has put his plans for utilizing the house’s large ballroom on pause, Schaeffer said a large part of his “philosophy and vision for the house” is to fill it often with special gatherings and charity events.

“I love bringing people together,” he said. 

It would be like “Great Gatsby Charleston-ized,” he said, referencing the literary character’s reputation as a frequent host for fine parties, though his planned functions are much more low-key than Gatsby’s: An annual literary festival, for examples, is planning to host a small number of guests there later this year. 

Formerly called the Battery Carriage House Inn while under the ownership of the Drayton-Hastie family, the property now goes by its address, 20 South Battery. All guest rooms have been redone and outfitted with new amenities, like Smart TVs and redone outlets, and antique beds dated pre-1870, Schaeffer said. 



Inn at reopened Post House in Mount Pleasant overhauled look, added room

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At the ‘Ratched’ Resort: the Adamson House Serves as Mexican Hotel

Love it or hate it, there is no denying that “Ratched,” Ryan Murphy’s latest foray into streaming, is a visual masterpiece! Each hairstyle, costume, and set seems to be prettier than the last! And don’t even get me started on the locations! Perhaps the most picturesque site used is the Mexican resort where Nurse Mildred Ratched (Sarah Paulson) and Gwendolyn Briggs (Cynthia Nixon) are shown living in 1950, two years after the main events of the series, at the end of the Season 1 finale, titled “Mildred and Edmund.” Cast and crew did not travel south of the border to film the resort scenes, nor did they make use of an actual hotel. Instead, a bit of Hollywood magic was employed to create the retro Mexican lodging within the Thirty Mile Zone. 

Mildred and Gwendolyn’s heavenly retreat is actually a mashup of two different locales – a historic Malibu mansion-turned-museum known as the Adamson House and a private West Hills residence that formerly belonged to actor Francis Lederer. I have long been familiar with both spots and recognized them as soon as I laid eyes on them in the episode.

Constructed in 1929, the Adamson House, a California Historical Landmark, was one of the first homes to be built in Malibu. The Spanish Colonial Revival estate was constructed for Rhoda Agatha Rindge Adamson and her husband, Merritt Adamson, on a 13-acre parcel of oceanside land gifted to the lucky couple by Rhoda’s mother, Rhoda May Knight Rindge (yes, mother and daughter shared the same first name!), the last owner of what was known as the Malibu Spanish Land Grant, aka the 21-mile-long (formerly 27-mile) coastal enclave that today makes up the ‘Bu. The elder Rhoda and her husband, Frederick Hastings Rindge, purchased the 13,000-acre seaside tract, which they

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