Housing

DVIDS – News – Under Secretary of Army McPherson tours schools, housing renovation site


FORT LEE, Va. (Oct. 13, 2020) — The Army’s second-highest-ranking civilian spent a good part of his day here Oct. 7 touring training facilities, conversing with troops and spotlighting efforts to improve privatized military family housing.

Under Secretary of the Army James McPherson received a glimpse of quartermaster and ordnance training, lunched with students at the Samuel Sharpe Dining Facility and addressed members of the media outside a newly renovated residence in the Jackson Circle neighborhood.

Maj. Gen. Rodney D. Fogg, U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command and Fort Lee commanding general, hosted the undersecretary and accompanied him throughout the tour.

McPherson’s first stop was the QM School’s Petroleum and Water Department. There, he met with administrators, instructors and students. He also received a familiarization on the latest virtual training systems said to save time and resources while improving technical skills.

Advanced individual training Soldiers Spc. Zoya Goodwin, Pvt. Xavier Sullivan-Dixon and Pvt. Paden Bear were among those who briefed the undersecretary, walking him through a virtual training session.

“We have a new breed coming into the force, and they gravitate toward technology,” pointed out PWD Director Jose Hernandez, who was present for the briefing and spoke highly of the professionalism and confidence demonstrated by his junior Soldiers. “This is what they like, and when you mesh what they like with the learning experience, the confidence level just goes up.”

McPherson spent roughly an hour at PWD and later presented Soldiers and leaders with coins. Hernandez said he was thrilled senior leaders are taking an interest in virtual learning programs at the school and is always glad to demonstrate how students are benefiting from it.

“I thought it was a great visit,” Hernandez said. “It was good to have someone from the Pentagon visit us and see how

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Pandemic-shift: spike in savings diverted into housing driving national median home prices up 8.6%, according to Royal LePage | Nachricht

Despite second wave worries, the median price of a home in Canada forecast to finish year 7.0% higher than year-end 2019

  • Delayed spring market extends through Q3 as pent up demand fuels prices and sales
  • 97% of regions surveyed post price appreciation in third quarter despite economic shock of COVID-19
  • Ontario and Quebec real estate markets dominate list of highest appreciating regions, with Windsor in the top spot at 17.0%

TORONTO, Oct. 14, 2020 /CNW/ – According to the Royal LePage House Price Survey and Market Survey Forecast released today, the aggregate1 price of a home in Canada increased 8.6 per cent year-over-year to $692,964 in the third quarter, as high demand and low inventory continued to fuel a seller’s market.

The Royal LePage National House Price Composite is compiled from proprietary property data in 64 of the nation’s largest real estate markets. When broken out by housing type, the median price of a standard two-storey home rose 10.0 per cent year-over-year to $819,906, while the median price of a bungalow increased 7.0 per cent to $570,701. The median price of a condominium increased 5.3 per cent year-over-year to $510,365. Price data, which includes both resale and new build, is provided by Royal LePage’s sister company RPS Real Property Solutions, a leading Canadian real estate valuation company.

“Typical consumption patterns have been disrupted in 2020 as the pandemic has driven the household savings rate to levels not seen in decades,” said Phil Soper, president and CEO of Royal LePage. “Most Canadians have sharply reduced spending on discretionary goods and services involving a great deal of human interaction, and with mortgage rates at record lows, many have refocused on housing investments, be it renovations to accommodate work-from-home needs, a recreational property or a new

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Housing policy: noble intentions, but improvements needed

The new policy expands housing possibilities, but falls short of addressing some fundamental issues

After staying long in the making, the first Tamil Nadu Affordable Urban Housing and Habitat Policy has been finally notified and it has been in the public realm for a few weeks now. Coming as it does, at a time when housing prices are steeply increasing, and owning or renting a house is possible only in far peripheries, the policy is a significant step. It has noble intentions and expands housing possibilities, including transit and rental housing for migrant workers. While this is a plus, in the absence of any reliable stock-taking, a clear statement of the problem and reassuring solutions, there are serious questions about the policy’s effectiveness.

Avowed objectives of the policy are three — first, the government will henceforth provide housing only for the very poor and ease its financial burden; second, it will nudge the private sector to provide affordable housing for the low and middle-income groups, particularly rental units; and third, using a shelter fund as a critical financial tool, it will support private developers to provide affordable housing and create a viable market for them. The policy rightly identifies that, besides building units, affordable housing, economically, requires the provision of social amenities, built sustainably and designed for climate resilience.

The ideas appear significant, but the problem is that they flounder on the fundamentals. A policy on affordable housing would usually first define affordability, estimate the demand and supply, work out the shortage, and spell out strategies to bridge them. However, the Tamil Nadu policy fails on this count. In the absence of a factual basis, a quantification of the problem and empirical measures to review the policy outcomes, good intentions could remain mere platitudes.

The fundamentals

Housing studies show that

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NeighborWorks plans new Boise affordable housing. Recent project had homes in low $200,000s

A Boise nonprofit that has created several pocket neighborhoods with affordable housing has plans for its most visible development yet.

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NeighborWorks Boise is looking to build 39 single-family homes — seven detached and 32 attached residences — at the southwest corner of the old Cole Elementary School property, located at Cole and Fairview roads. The project, known as ColeBluff Cottages, would features homes with one to three stories, two to four bedrooms, and square footage between 816 and 1,998.

Each home would have two to four bedrooms and be 816 square feet to 1,998 square feet. Plans for the complex include 16 garages and 55 parking spaces — 25 covered and 30 uncovered.

“We are really excited about this project and to the degree we can honor the site with some our our architecture and different features, remembering what was once there,” Neighborworks CEO Bud Compher told the Boise City Council on Tuesday.

The council unanimously approved a preliminary plat. It will need to go through a design review before construction can begin.

“I appreciate you guys coming forward with this development,” Council President Elaine Clegg told Compher before the vote. “It’s been a tough site, and this seems to meet not just the conditions of the development agreement, but much of what the neighborhood asked for.”

To create a sense of community, the homes would open to two central courtyards, and there would be two pergolas, raised garden beds and walking paths.

NeighborWorks owns 283 multifamily units for low-income families. It has also developed four pocket neighborhood projects in Garden City and two in Boise. A fifth Garden City project is being built now.

Pocket neighborhoods look to move residents closer to where they work and play. They also attempt to design the housing so that neighbors

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Manufactured Housing REITs: Not Enough Homes, So Onto Boats

REIT Rankings: Manufactured Housing

manufactured housing reits

(Hoya Capital Real Estate, Co-produced with Brad Thomas)

Manufactured Housing REIT Overview

Manufactured Housing REITs (“MH REITs”) have proven to be immune from coronavirus-related headwinds that have slammed much of the real estate sector, collecting nearly 100% of rents, while also boosting dividends this year. Within the Hoya Capital Manufactured Housing REIT Index, we track the three MH REITs, which account for roughly $25 billion in market value: Equity LifeStyle Properties (ELS), Sun Communities (SUI), and UMH Properties (UMH). In addition to MH communities, these REITs also manage transient, seasonal, and membership-based RV parks and boat marina, which account for roughly 30-40% of the REITs’ portfolio.

mobile home REITs

While not included in the REIT indexes, it should be noted that Cavco Industries (CVCO) and Skyline Champion Corp. (SKY) are the largest publicly traded builders of manufactured homes, while Winnebago Industries (WGO), Thor Industries (THO), and Camping World Holdings (CWH) are all closely linked to the performance of the RV sector. MH units, colloquially known as “mobile homes”, are typically the most affordable non-subsidized housing option in most markets. MH REITs own roughly 5% of the five million manufactured housing sites in the United States. MH REITs comprise 2% of the “Core” REIT ETFs and also represent 4% of the Hoya Capital US Housing Index, the benchmark that tracks the GDP-weighted performance of the US housing industry.

housing 100 index

Roughly one in twelve Americans live in a factory-built manufactured home, and shipments of these units represent roughly 10% of housing starts in a typical year. The quality and appearance of MH sites can vary significantly from communities that are indistinguishable from a typical single-family, master-planned community to the stereotypical “trailer parks”. These REITs generally own communities in the higher tiers of the quality spectrum and are more “retiree-oriented” than the

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