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Passaic Dignity Home Offers A Place For Homeless Individuals To Receive Mail

PASSAIC, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Having a mailbox is something most people don’t think twice about, but many homeless individuals don’t have a place to get important documents or letters.

The city of Passaic is changing that.

CBS2’s Jenna DeAngelis spoke to a man who didn’t want to share his name but shared the hardships faced since losing his job as a handyman nine months ago.

“When you lose your job, you don’t got no money to pay the rent,” he said.

It’s a problem experienced by many in the pandemic. The man says no home and no mailing address means “for a job, especially if you apply for something, you never know they respond, you never know if they accept you.”

RELATED STORY: Volunteer Groups Gearing Up To Provide Coats, Blankets For Homeless Individuals As Temperatures Drop

“It came up in a conversation with me that some don’t have access to mail, things that we take for granted every single day. They don’t know how to connect to get their benefits, whether social security, or even if they applied for a job, what address are they gonna put down for correspondence?” Passaic Mayor Hector Lora said.

Now, they can put down 276 Broadway — the address for Passaic Dignity House, which now has mailboxes designated to homeless individuals.

“This is not just for someone to come in and say ‘Give me a mailbox’ and we won’t see you for six or seven months. These are people we want to follow because the ultimate goal is to get them off the street,” Lora said.

That can start with a simple letter, which the post office delivers through a slot. Human Services takes care of the rest.

The mail either gets placed in one of 21 mailboxes or it’s held for

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Springfield Preservation Trusts honors organizations, individuals for historic renovation projects

SPRINGFIELD — The Springfield Preservation Trust is conducting its annual awards ceremony on Sept. 30 to honor organizations and individuals for historic renovations.

The event it will be held remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic, and offered as a livestream on Facebook at 7 p.m.

The Preservation Awards honor individuals and organizations that help restore and preserve historic places in Springfield.

The Donald Courtemanche Award for Restoration will go to:

  • Listen Lynda LLC for the adaptive reuse of the historic Masonic Temple at 339 State St.
  • The city of Springfield for the restoration of the front stairs and decorative cornice at the Springfield Central Library, 220 State St.
  • DevelopSpringfield for the restoration of the Trinity Block, now known as the Springfield Innovation Center, at 276 Bridge St.
  • Icarian Real Estate Advisors for restoration of 120 Mill St.
  • Caron Management for stabilization of 116-120 Longhill St.
  • Jesse & Emila Lederman for restoration of the front porch at 129 Spruceland Ave.
  • Marianne Winters and Karan Parkin for restoration and preservation of 56 Harvard St.
  • Derrick and Lillian Hill for appropriate new construction of a garage at 111 Florida St.
Springfield Preservation Trust Awards

The home at 56 Harvard St. is one of this year’s winners. (Don Treeger / The Republican)

The Edward Sims Award for Stewardship will go to Sarah Murray and John Toms for 79 Bowdoin St.

The Robert Holbrook Award for Stewardship will go to James and the late Cynthia Landers for 270 Springfield St.

The George Pooler Award for Stewardship will go to Mary Ann and the late Francis Maloney for 320 Forest Park Ave.

Photographs of 2020 award winners will be on display at the Lyman and Merrie Wood Museum of Springfield History and on the trust’s website.

The Springfield Preservation Trust is a nonprofit organization founded in 1972 to help preserve,

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