killed

Call for safety improvements at intersection near Viola follows crash that killed mother, 4 children



a fire hydrant in the middle of a field: A memorial in Sedgwick County marks the intersection where a mother and four children died in a crash Friday (Sept. 25, 2020).


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A memorial in Sedgwick County marks the intersection where a mother and four children died in a crash Friday (Sept. 25, 2020).

WICHITA, Kan. (KWCH) – The Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office on Monday provided an update to its investigation into a Friday afternoon crash near Viola that killed four children and their mother.

The sheriff’s office said the family’s SUV was traveling southbound on 263rd Street West when the driver of a grain truck, traveling east on 71st Street South, failed to stop at the stop sign at the intersection. The intersection of 263rd Street West and 71st Street South is where the SUV hit the rear of the grain truck’s trailer after the truck’s driver ran the sign, deputies said.

Sedgwick County is looking to make changes to the intersection with the goal of preventing another tragedy at the spot north of Viola in southwest Sedgwick County. The sheriff’s office, county engineers, and Public Works returned to the intersection Monday to see what they could implement. Some who live near 263rd West and 71st South say the intersection is not safe.

On Friday (Sept. 25), sheriff’s deputies and other emergency crews responded to two crashes at the intersection north of Viola, reported within hours of each other. The second crash fatally injured the mother and her four children. In both cases, the sheriff’s office said drivers failed to stop at a stop sign. Sedgwick County Commissioner David Dennis is among those saying there needs to be a change at the intersection.

“There will be two investigations, one by the sheriff’s department and then one by our director of public works, with our traffic safety engineer. But with an accident this significant, we need to get something to happen sooner rather than later,”

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Mansfield man killed by grizzly bear in Alaska

MANSFIELD –  A 22-year-old Mansfield man was killed by a grizzly bear in an Alaska state park Sunday while on a moose hunting trip, the National Park Service reported Thursday.

Mansfield police attempted to notify family on Tuesday that Austin Pfeiffer, of Mansfield, had died, according to a report at the Mansfield Police Department. An Alaska state trooper called MPD to have an officer contact Austin’s wife, Ryleigh Pfeiffer, regarding a wildlife encounter while hunting in Alaska, according to information the News Journal obtained.

Pfeiffer was a job site foreman with Dolce’s Tree Service and a skilled tree climber, lift operator and all-around handyman, according to his employer’s website.

According to his Facebook page, Austin was also employed at Gamemaster Taxidermy. Austin would have turned 23 on Tuesday. He married Ryleigh Hunter Pfeiffer on Oct. 20, 2018.

Wednesday, his family declined comment.

According to abcnews.go.com, the incident happened Sunday in the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, a 13.2-million-acre area in southeast Alaska, while the hunter was on a 10-day moose hunt with a friend near the Chisana River drainage at the time of the attack.

The attack occurred in a remote area approximately 50 air miles from the nearest community of Northway, Alaska, and 130 miles from park headquarters, according to the National Park Service.

More: Grizzly bear kills hunter in largest US national park in first-of-its-kind attack

The attack occurred near the Cottonwood Creek drainage, an area of mixed tundra and forest lands with dense vegetation, while the hunting part was salvaging meat from a moose harvested the day before, according to a news release issued Thursday by the National Park Service.

The NPS said an investigation determined that it was a surprise attack and that a defensive firearm or other deterrent, such as bear spray, was

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Mansfield man killed by grizzly bear in Alaska while on hunting trip

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The attack occurred in the 13.2-million-acre Wrangell St. Elias National Park, the largest in the U.S. park system, in southeastern Alaska. (Photo: Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve)

MANSFIELD –  A 22-year-old Mansfield man was killed by a grizzly bear in an Alaska state park Sunday while on a moose hunting trip, the National Park Service reported Thursday.

Mansfield police attempted to notify family on Tuesday that Austin Pfeiffer, of Mansfield, had died, according to a report at the Mansfield Police Department. An Alaska state trooper called MPD to have an officer contact Austin’s wife, Ryleigh Pfeiffer, regarding a wildlife encounter while hunting in Alaska, according to information the News Journal obtained.

Pfeiffer was a job site foreman with Dolce’s Tree Service and a skilled tree climber, lift operator and all-around handyman, according to his employer’s website.

According to his Facebook page, Austin was also employed at Gamemaster Taxidermy. Austin would have turned 23 on Tuesday. He married Ryleigh Hunter Pfeiffer on Oct. 20, 2018.

Wednesday, his family declined comment.

According to abcnews.go.com, the incident happened Sunday in the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, a 13.2-million-acre area in southeast Alaska, while the hunter was on a 10-day moose hunt with a friend near the Chisana River drainage at the time of the attack.

The attack occurred in a remote area approximately 50 air miles from the nearest community of Northway, Alaska, and 130 miles from park headquarters, according to the National Park Service.

More: Grizzly bear kills hunter in largest US national park in first-of-its-kind attack

The attack occurred near the Cottonwood Creek drainage, an area of mixed tundra and forest lands with dense vegetation, while the hunting part was salvaging meat from a moose harvested the day before, according to a news release issued Thursday by the

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Ohio man on moose hunt killed by grizzly bear in Alaska

MANSFIELD –  A 22-year-old Mansfield man was killed by a grizzly bear in an Alaska state park Sunday while on a moose hunting trip, the National Park Service reported Thursday.

Mansfield police attempted to notify family on Tuesday that Austin Pfeiffer, of Mansfield, had died, according to a report at the Mansfield Police Department. An Alaska state trooper called MPD to have an officer contact Austin’s wife, Ryleigh Pfeiffer, regarding a wildlife encounter while hunting in Alaska, according to information the News Journal obtained.

Pfeiffer’s family declined comment Wednesday.

An investigation determined that it was a surprise attack and that a defensive firearm or other deterrents, such as bear spray, was not readily available to the victim. 

The NPS said it was notified of the attack at approximately 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Through coordination with a local air taxi service used by hunters, the NPS ensured the site was secure and that the victim’s hunting partner was safely evacuated from the area.

The following day, the NPS coordinated with Alaska Wildlife troopers to recover the victim’s body, which was transported to the Alaska State Medical Examiner’s Office in Anchorage.

The incident happened Sunday in the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, a 13.2 million-acre national park that rises from the ocean up to 18,008 feet, while the hunter was on a 10-day moose hunt with a friend.

The attack occurred in a remote area approximately 50 air miles from the nearest community of Northway, Alaska, and 130 miles from park headquarters, according

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