Lake

Study finds Lake Erie, Detroit River improvements but cites threats

A lot in the water and shoreline of the Detroit River and western Lake Erie is much more environmentally sound than a generation or two ago, but new threats to the ecosystem are approaching tipping points, according to a 500-page, two-year study to be released Tuesday by an array of concerned officials and private citizens from the United States and Canada.

“Checkup: Assessing Ecosystem Health of the Detroit River and Western Lake Erie,” the 11th annual “State of the Strait” report, calls for new attention and remedial action to secure a healthful future.

“We’ve seen some really amazing ecological revivals of the Detroit River,” said John Hartig, a conservationist who helped prepare the international report, sponsored by companies, nonprofit groups, philanthropy and other sources.

“There were no bald eagles, 30 years ago, peregrine falcons, osprey, lake sturgeon or lake white fish spawning in the Detroit River. Mayflies weren’t around, and beaver weren’t here.

“But they are all back,” said Hartig, a visiting scholar at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research and a member of the board of directors of the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy.

“Lake Erie is the same way. The bad news is we have some major problems, a series of problems, eight of which are documented in the report,” he said.

Climate change, pollution and nutrient-rich runoff from the land, algae blooms, toxic contamination, invasive species, habitat loss and degradation, urban sprawl and environmental justice are all pressing issues, according to the

Continue Reading

Winston Lake is getting more parking spaces, a new picnic shelter and pier. Improvements continue also continue at other Winston-Salem parks. | Politics

*Creating the walking path from the new shelter alongside the lake toward the dam and aquatic center. The path will be made of crushed stone.

*The “knoll,” a small hill that has a scenic view of the lake, will get new picnic tables and stairs to replace the eroding footpath that leads up the hill now.

The Winston-Salem City Council awarded the contract for the work over the summer, along with contracts for other park projects that are being paid for from the 2018 bonds:

*A brand-new “pocket park” will be built on Bethania-Rural Hill Road beside Fire Station 20. The park will be called Bethania Freedmen’s Park, in recognition of the Bethania Freedmen’s community that developed in the area after the Civil War.

The park will have fitness equipment, a restroom and plantings. The work includes site preparation and grading. Since the park is beside Station 20, the work will also include a new driveway to the station, making for better entry to the station.

Garanco Inc. of Pilot Mountain is doing the work for $723,900.

*Playground improvements at Reynolds, Skyland and Lockland parks will be done at a cost of $534,000 by the W.C. Construction Co. of Winston-Salem. Reynolds and Skyland parks will get new equipment and be fully accessible with the addition of rubber surfaces on an asphalt base, while Lockland will get new equipment but remain with a mulched surface. 

Source Article

Continue Reading

Check out renovation progress at the iconic Salt Lake Temple

(Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) The cables photographed here are stretched with tension by a… (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) The 1960s construction of the sealing addition, chapel and n… (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) In this July 2020 photo, crews dismantle the 1960s additions… (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) In this June 2020 photo, an auger is drilling a hole with th… (Photo courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) Piles of steel, copper, aluminum, stone and concrete are … (Photo courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) The equipment photographed here calculates and lines up a… (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) As part of strengthening the temple foundation in preparatio… (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) In this July 2020 photo, crews dismantle the 1960s additions… (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) As part of strengthening the temple foundation in preparatio… (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) A construction worker looks at a pile of base isolators. The… (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) This retaining wall of 4-inch-thick wood lagging will eventu… (Photo courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) Piles of steel, copper, aluminum, stone and concrete are … (Photo courtesy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) Piles of steel, copper, aluminum, stone and concrete are … (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) The 1960s construction of the sealing addition, chapel and n… (Photo courtesy The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) In this August 2020 photos, crews

Continue Reading