late

Fraternity members, volunteers remodel late officer’s home

NEW ALBANY, Ind. (AP) — Starr Pavey said her heart has been broken since her husband, Bill, died in June, but a wide smile appeared across her face as she spoke about his personality and gregarious nature.

Bill was a jokester who made everyone smile, even while he was battling cancer for the last five years of his life, Starr said.

“We laughed all of the time until the last month or so. He said it hurt him to laugh,” Starr said of her late husband.

Bill Pavey was well-known throughout southern Indiana for his service to the community. He worked for the New Albany-Floyd County Parks Department for over eight years as a park ranger before serving as a New Albany police officer for two decades.


It was the day of his death, June 3, when Starr said a friend who was at her house mentioned smelling gas. A few days later, she also noticed the smell, and upon further inspection, a serious gas leak was discovered under her home along with about five feet of standing water.

“It’s just been overwhelming stress since before he died. It’s been one nightmare after the other,” Starr said.

She knew some work was needed on the New Albany house, but said Bill didn’t want any interruptions during their last few months together.

But the impact Bill Pavey had on others during his life has been exemplified by what others have been willing to do in his honor after his death.

Pavey was one of the founding fathers of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity at Indiana University Southeast. Over 40 years later, his fraternity brothers are in the midst of an extensive rehabilitation project of his house.

Mark Kruer and Mark Lawrence are co-coordinators of the effort, but it’s been a team

Continue Reading

Fraternity members, volunteers remodel late officer’s home

NEW ALBANY, Ind. (AP) — Starr Pavey said her heart has been broken since her husband, Bill, died in June, but a wide smile appeared across her face as she spoke about his personality and gregarious nature.

Bill was a jokester who made everyone smile, even while he was battling cancer for the last five years of his life, Starr said.

“We laughed all of the time until the last month or so. He said it hurt him to laugh,” Starr said of her late husband.


Bill Pavey was well-known throughout southern Indiana for his service to the community. He worked for the New Albany-Floyd County Parks Department for over eight years as a park ranger before serving as a New Albany police officer for two decades.

It was the day of his death, June 3, when Starr said a friend who was at her house mentioned smelling gas. A few days later, she also noticed the smell, and upon further inspection, a serious gas leak was discovered under her home along with about five feet of standing water.



“It’s just been overwhelming stress since before he died. It’s been one nightmare after the other,” Starr said.

She knew some work was needed on the New Albany house, but said Bill didn’t want any interruptions during their last few months together.


But the impact Bill Pavey had on others during his life has been exemplified by what others have been willing to do in his honor after his death.

Pavey was one of the founding fathers of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity at Indiana University Southeast. Over 40 years later, his fraternity brothers are in the midst of an extensive rehabilitation project of his house.


Mark Kruer and Mark Lawrence are co-coordinators of the effort, but it’s been a team

Continue Reading

Two California Homes Owned by Late Kleiner Perkins Co-founder Hit The Market

Two California properties owned by the late venture capitalist Frank J. Caufield are separately coming on the market for $39.75 million and $19.5 million.

Mr. Caufield, who died last year at 80, co-founded Silicon Valley powerhouse Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers, which made investments in some of tech’s best-known companies including Amazon. Mr. Caufield stepped away from his daily role at the firm, now known as Kleiner Perkins, in 2000.

The pricier of the two properties is a nearly 12-acre estate in celebrity-studded Montecito, Calif. The roughly 18,500-square-foot, nine-bedroom Italian Renaissance-inspired villa was designed around 1927 by George Washington Smith, a prominent Santa Barbara architect, according to research by Sotheby’s International Realty, which is listing both homes.


An Italian Renaissance-Inspired Montecito mansion

The villa was designed around 1927 by George Washington Smith, a prominent California architect

A Montecito, Calif., mansion dating to the 1920s is coming on the market for $39.75 million.

Gavin Cater

1 of 8


The home still has many of its original details including inlaid golden travertine floors in the entrance gallery, hand-carved walnut paneled walls in the library and carved limestone arched windows in the dining room. The property has three separate wine cellars: one for white wine, one for red wine and one for aging, as well as a solarium with a 38-foot pool and a beamed ceiling and a study.

The Montecito property also has extensive gardens; both the gardens and the house were inspired by Italian villas, including Villa Gamberaia near Florence, according to Sothebys’ research. The landscape includes the biggest dragon tree in Santa Barbara, according to a search conducted by local growers in

Continue Reading

Always a brother: Fraternity members, volunteers remodel late police officer’s home | News

NEW ALBANY — Starr Pavey said her heart has been broken since her husband, Bill, died in June, but a wide smile appeared across her face as she spoke about his personality and gregarious nature.

Bill was a jokester who made everyone smile, even while he was battling cancer for the last five years of his life, Starr said.

“We laughed all of the time until the last month or so. He said it hurt him to laugh,” Starr said of her late husband.

Bill Pavey was well-known throughout Southern Indiana for his service to the community. He worked for the New Albany-Floyd County Parks Department for over eight years as a park ranger before serving as a New Albany police officer for two decades.

It was the day of his death, June 3, when Starr said a friend who was at her house mentioned smelling gas. A few days later, she also noticed the smell, and upon further inspection, a serious gas leak was discovered under her home along with about five feet of standing water.



Bill Pavey

Bill Pavey


“It’s just been overwhelming stress since before he died. It’s been one nightmare after the other,” Starr said.

She knew some work was needed on the New Albany house, but said Bill didn’t want any interruptions during their last few months together.

But the impact Bill Pavey had on others during his life has been exemplified by what others have been willing to do in his honor after his death.



Home construction 2

Doug Curry and volunteers worked on flooring inside a room in Starr Pavey’s house Saturday morning. Their goal is to secure the flooring by replacing the floor joists.




Pavey was one of the founding fathers of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity at Indiana University Southeast. Over 40

Continue Reading