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Holm Auto Good News: Salina Tech students eager to learn, while remodeling Ashby House shelter – News – Salina Journal

Pumped with zeal and strapped into a loaded carpenter’s belt, Jordan Castaneda greeted Salina Technical College classmates for some on-the-job learning.

“I’m ready to get this party going,” said the 18-year-old Salinan on Wednesday, aching for some construction work after spending weeks mostly in a classroom.

The budding builders were “chomping at the bit. They’ve been in the classroom since the start of the semester (Aug. 20),” said Kevin Watters, Salina Tech construction technology instructor.

His crew that ranges in size from eight to 11, was eager to join in the remodel of an Ashby House shelter at 158 S. Eighth.

“I love getting hands on, in the action. The days go faster. It feels like forever in the classroom,” said Castaneda, a 2020 Salina Central High School graduate, who credits his uncle, Mario Martinez, owner of a Salina construction business, for introducing him to the trade, and gifting him the passion to build.

Several departments at the technical college have joined in repurposing the 100-plus-year-old, two-story home that was moved to the Ashby House complex during the summer of 2019.

Salina-based Blue Beacon International’s hotels division, Lighthouse Properties, donated the house, moving expenses and some of the concrete costs, to Ashby House.

The old home had to go to create more room for the new downtown Salina hotel, Homewood Suites by Hilton.

Attached to a basement foundation, the house is undergoing a $400,000 transformation into a 30-bed primary shelter, said Andy Houltberg, Ashby House executive director.

The nonprofit organization that runs a shelter for women and families, and a number of other programs — Sober Living Program, Free Store open to the community, Transitional Housing, Toy Store and Career Closet — has raised about half of the money and services necessary to complete the work, Houltberg said, through grants

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How to learn DIY home repair skills for free

The handyman looked at the plaster dangling from the top of our downstairs window. Then, he headed upstairs to check the seal on the window directly overhead.

“It needs some caulk,” he announced when he returned. “If I come out again and fix it, it’ll cost $250. Or, you can pick up caulk for two or three bucks and do it yourself.”

My husband and I exchanged a nervous glance. The last time I’d held a caulk gun was 10 years ago. He never had.

But we’d just been told how to knock 99% off our potential repair bill. It seemed like now was the perfect time to learn!

If you’re considering your own home repair or remodel, you’re not alone. Amid the increasing transition to a work-from-home life, 75% of Americans said they’re making improvements to their homes, according to a recent Travelers insurance company survey.

We’re here with ways to help you get started on your own DIY.

Guide to DIY home repairs

When we moved into our first house, it seemed like everything started breaking. The toilet ran. The bathroom fan died. Rain leaking in the upstairs window loosened plaster in our dining room.

No wonder financial experts recommend homeowners save between 1% and 3% of the value of their home for annual maintenance and repairs.

Thankfully, you can save hundreds or even thousands annually by doing some of the repairs on your own. Here’s how.

Learn to do DIY home repairs online

Your phone may end up being your most important tool.

Home DIY apps can help at just about every stage of a home improvement project. Better yet, several great ones are free.

On Houzz, a social media platform that connects home professionals and enthusiastic DIY remodelers, you’ll find all the design inspiration you could

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How to Learn DIY Home Repair Skills for Free | Pennyhoarder

Editor’s note: This post was originally published in 2015 and has been updated.

The handyman looked at the plaster dangling from the top of our downstairs window. Then, he headed upstairs to check the seal on the window directly overhead.

“It needs some caulk,” he announced when he returned. “If I come out again and fix it, it’ll cost $250. Or, you can pick up caulk for two or three bucks and do it yourself.”

My husband and I exchanged a nervous glance. The last time I’d held a caulk gun was 10 years ago. He never had.

But we’d just been told how to knock 99% off our potential repair bill. It seemed like now was the perfect time to learn!

We’re here with ways to help you get started on your own DIY.

Guide to DIY Home Repairs

When we moved into our first house, it seemed like everything started breaking. The toilet ran. The bathroom fan died. Rain leaking in the upstairs window loosened plaster in our dining room.

No wonder financial experts recommend homeowners save between 1% and 3% of the value of their home for annual maintenance and repairs.

Thankfully, you can save hundreds or even thousands annually by doing some of the repairs on your own. Here’s how.

Learn to Do DIY Home Repairs Online

Your phone may end up being your most important tool.

Home DIY apps can help at just about every stage of a home improvement project. Better yet, several great ones are free.

On Houzz, a social media platform that connects home professionals and enthusiastic DIY remodelers, you’ll find all the design inspiration you could dream of, plus lots of tutorials.

Pro Tip

Before you start a project, decide where it falls on your to-do list. You might want a

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