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Galaxy Note 20 Ultra Gets A New Update With Battery Life Improvements

Samsung is rolling out a second OTA update for the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra in less than a week’s time. The earlier update included the October 2020 security patch along with the usual improvements and bug fixes. This new OTA update is currently rolling out for Galaxy Note 20 Ultra users in Germany and is claimed to improve battery life.

It comes with the build number N986BXXX1ATJ1 and is 255.63MB in size. As per the changelog, the update will also bring stability improvements for dark mode and the camera. However, the company hasn’t revealed the specifics of these improvements. It remains to be seen how well the cameras will perform with the updated Camera app.

Latest Galaxy Note 20 Ultra update to further improve battery life

While the changelog also mentions the October Android security patch, the previous update already included it. Interestingly, the regular Galaxy Note 20 hasn’t received this new update yet. While the Galaxy Note 20 Ultra in the US comes powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 865+ SoC, the European variant packs the in-house Exynos 990 SoC.

Hence, no one should sideload the firmware file intended for the Exynos variant on the Snapdragon variant or vice versa. In the coming days, this new update might expand to other regions as well.

If there is no notification regarding the new update, users can manually check for the latest update by going to Settings > Software Update > Download. Once the update shows up on your smartphone, tap on the “Install now” button to download and install it.

No One UI 3.0 public beta update yet for the Galaxy Note 20 series

Samsung might soon add the Galaxy Note 20 series to the One UI 3.0 public beta program. Samsung is offering a lot of new features and UI

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Enthusiasts suffer cooking burnout 6 months into stay-at-home life, look for fresh ideas | Pune News

Pune: After participating in various social media challenges that gained momentum when the lockdown began, enthusiastically baking, plating and taking ‘Insta-worthy’ images, people are at their wit’s end trying to keep things interesting in the kitchen.
Six months after staying home, people are going through a cooking burnout. “I love to cook, but thinking of what to make has become frustrating of late. We’ve tried many different recipes from various cuisines — Mexican, Spanish, African, and so on, to shake things up between regular Indian home food. But even that has become boring now,” said a cooking enthusiast in the city.
Chef and restaurateur Rachel Goenka said, “It’s unfair to burden one person with deciding what to cook. We usually plan a menu in advance for the week. We think about splitting up the week into vegetarian and non-vegetarian days or deciding on what day you would like to cook certain protein. At my house, Sundays is always about biryani.”
A meal plan can also help a person alternate between carbohydrates — rice and roti. Introduce variety by adding ground oats, ragi, buckwheat, grated paneer or vegetables to the dough, the play of colours and textures could spruce up a meal.
Chef Irfan Pabaney added that sticking to a weekly meal plan takes effort. “And the family isn’t helpful at all,” he said, adding, “The key is to be fairly well-stocked so you can wing it. Challenge yourself to make three things a week that you’ve never made before. Make a heavy-ish lunch with Indian food and a lighter dinner that could be anything from a stir fry, pasta or a salad. Cold cuts, sausages and eggs help tremendously. Finish your dinner prep between 4-6 pm so that putting everything together doesn’t take time,” he said.

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I like my showers very hot. Will an icy blast turn me into a better person? | Romesh Ranganathan | Life and style

I was away for work last week when we got on to the subject of showers. This is something that comes up a lot when travelling, as the quality of bathroom facilities very much determines the mood of the TV shoot. One of the hotels we stayed in last year seemed to be only pretending to have running water, and so the filming days quickly descended into a group of smelly people irritably snapping at each other. At another hotel, it would take about 20 minutes to get a cupful of hot water, which meant showers took an hour and consisted of being naked and freezing and occasionally basting yourself.

On last week’s shoot, though, the director of the show claimed that cold showers were the way forward. I would agree, if the context was specifically for the extraction of information from hostages. I found myself wondering if this was another load of middle-class bullshit, like the six-month period when everyone was putting butter in their coffee.

I am very much of the school of thought that showers should be extremely hot. For some reason, I equate very hot with very clean. I like to feel as if the top layer of skin has been singed off, so that I emerge from the cubicle a brand new Romesh – after, of course, having squeegeed the walls of the shower, during which I like to role-play as a nice window cleaner. I also like the pressure to be so high that you feel as if you’re being sandblasted, smashed so hard against the back of the wall that you would be unsurprised to be hit by a goat that had been caught up in the tornado. All of this is environmentally unsound, to say the least. Even so, cold showering sounded

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Make the most of your home improvement dollars | Suburban Life

Home improvement projects provide homeowners with a chance to put their own stamp on their homes. In addition, many such projects make homes safer and, in some instances, more eco-friendly.

The opportunity to make a home more comfortable, safer and/or more eco-friendly entices many homeowners to open their wallets. In fact, the Home Improvement Research Institute estimates that the home improvement products market will grow by more than 5% in 2018.

Homeowners might experience some sticker shock when researching home improvement projects or receiving estimates from contractors. But there are ways for budget-conscious homeowners to transform their homes and still make the most of their home improvement dollars.

• Do your homework. Each year, Remodeling magazine publishes its “Cost vs. Value Report,” a comprehensive study of 21 popular remodeling projects in 149 United States markets. The report notes the value each project retains at resale in 100 markets across the country. Homeowners who want to get the strongest return on investment can access the “Cost vs. Value Report” (remodeling.how.net) to see which home improvement projects are best suited for them.

• Do some of the labor yourself. Homeowners willing to swing a hammer also can stretch their home improvement dollars. For example, the home improvement resource This Old House® notes that homeowners willing to do their own demolition before the contractors arrive can save substantial amounts of money. A professional contractor may charge $1,000 to demo a 200-square-foot deck, but This Old House estimates that homeowners who demo their own decks may spend only $450 (for the dumpster rental and parking permit).

• Hire a consultant. The DIY movement is incredibly popular, no doubt thanks to television channels such as HGTV and the DIY Network. Homeowners with DIY experience may be able to complete projects on their own with little

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Stretch your imagination: High Country architects bring clients’ ideas and inspirations to life

The ‘Fly Barn’ is an intimate structure adjacent to the main house, wherein the fly-fishing contingent store their fly rods, vests and drift boat, as well as sit at the bench tying flies and regale each other with fish stories.
Photo courtesy Shepherd Resources Inc.

Everyone has their own ideas about what makes a home truly stand apart from the rest, but sometimes, it takes a little inspiration from others to get those creative juices really flowing. Homeowners curate ideas from all kinds of sources — from magazines to favorite vacation memories — and experienced architects bring those visions to life. Here are several examples of cool home elements to get your motor running.

Lighting it up

Doug DeChant and his associates at Shepherd Resources Inc. believe that light is central to any good design, be it light of the sun, moon or fire.

Whether it’s an indoor fireplace or outdoor firepit, mesmerizing flames go a long way in adding ambiance. Adam Harrison, principal at Shepherd Resources, worked with a client who wanted a 1950s to 1960s lodge with a contemporary twist.

Since fireplaces were always a significant feature of lodges and cabins, Harrison placed a gas fireplace in the middle of the open floor plan. But this isn’t just any fireplace: its long, black steel hood hovers from the ceiling, supported by a truss system so no legs reach to the floor. Of course, such an intriguing element required a unique fire element, so rather than a regular metal log set, Harrison contracted Brooklyn artist Elena Columbo to fashion stainless steel rods to “fuel” the fire.

Recalling the ‘60s, this metal flue element is fully suspended over the primary fireplace, supported by intersecting steel beams. Appropriately, the husband plays folk guitar in the fire’s glow.
Photo courtesy Shepherd Resources
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