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Dine on Design: London’s best-looking restaurants

From Latin American splendour to a chic French corner, London’s most stylish venues put presentation on a par with cuisine.

With a selection of places to eat, drink and feast on fabulous design, we celebrate the spaces that don’t compromise on ingredients or decor.

A glamorous pub conversion, a lower ground fine dining experience and a concept store meets restaurant with a Seventies twist are in the mix.


Whether you are seeking interiors inspiration or fancy a delectable dinner these are the spots to know…

Casa Cruz

Where? On leafy Clarendon Road in Notting Hill.

Design details: The vision of charming restaurateur and designer Juan Santa Cruz, this vibrant haunt is wonderfully glamorous. Cruz left behind a career in finance and business to pursue his passion for hospitality and interiors much to the delight of everyone who visits his super stylish restaurants. The early Victorian property had a previous guise as a pub. The building’s original details stand strong, including the tall, dual aspect window cornices on the upper floors which were spared during the Blitz.

Inside blends the traditional and the contemporary. Copper, a signature of Cruz’s native Argentina, glistens from the moment you enter the two-storey venue. It lines the walls and railings and is offset with infinity mirrors (even in the bathroom) to create a twinkling environment. Seating is a sumptuous emerald green and there is a sunburst design woven into the carpet. Each floor has a statement bar and there is a heated outdoor roof terrace.

This is a place worthy of your favourite new outfit as you sip on a glorious cocktail and savour the beautifully prepared South American and Latin cuisine under the helm of new head chef Gaz Herbert (formerly of Ikoyi). A joy in every

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London’s most magical and eccentric house reopens to the public this week

In the basement kitchen of Sir John Soane’s Museum in Lincoln’s Inn Fields – which reopens this week – there’s a mummified whippet half stuck into a bread roll. It’s not an insight into the domestic catering arrangements of one of England’s greatest architects. It’s part of a show called ‘Degrees of Truth’ by artist duo Langlands & Bell. Their works are scattered throughout the house, which now has a one-way system in place. The exhibition closed along with the museum back in March. Langlands & Bell found the grisly dried-out pooch on a stall in Brick Lane market and incorporated it into their work. You sort of picture the dog alive and in the house, snoozing in front of the range. Then you realise that this connection is momentary – the dog and the house have interacted for the first and only time in their respective histories.

Sir John Soane's Museum
Photograph: Chris Waywell

Sir John Soane’s London house makes time work like this. It’s full of dead things. I mean, full. The architect, who was responsible for the Bank of England, Dulwich Picture Gallery, Pitzhanger Manor and many other significant commissions, made his own home a strange and delirious living museum of the dead, with a ‘sepulchral chamber’ in the cellar containing a sarcophagus, statues of the dead, paintings of ruins. It’s not remotely morbid, or gloomy or gothic. It’s an artful balance of light and shade, colour and blackness: a dreamspace. 

Sir John Soane’s Museum
Photograph: Chris Waywell

Actually, Langlands & Bell are a weirdly good fit for Sir John Soane’s Museum. Their preoccupations – how spaces and buildings both reflect and define the individual, how power structures and physical structures overlap, how history and the future exist in the present – chime with many of Soane’s ideas: an avant-garde architect in thrall to

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