Moves

2021 Design & Construction Week Moves to Virtual Event

After evaluating multiple safety and travel concerns related to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) recently announced its intention to move the 8th annual Design & Construction Week, which features the International Builders’ Show (IBS) and Kitchen & Bath Industry Show (KBIS) to a robust, all-virtual event platform.

While Design & Construction Week was originally scheduled to take place on Feb. 9-11, 2021 at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., the new all-virtual DCW 2021 will still take place the week of Feb. 8 with extended programming.

“Out of an abundance of caution and concern for the safety of our exhibitors, attendees and the thousands of onsite workers who support the premier event of the residential construction industry, we feel the only prudent course is to make this year’s show a virtual event,” says NAHB chairman Chuck Fowke, a custom home builder from Tampa, Fla.

“We have plenty of great virtual educational programs, innovative products, services and workshops on tap, and we are very excited about the 2021 show. It’s an opportunity to set a precedent for the industry by producing a dynamic virtual trade show, and we look forward to a very successful Design & Construction Week.”

“This difficult decision comes following months of lengthy conversations with NAHB and Emerald,” says Bill Darcy, CEO of the NKBA. “The safety and well-being of our attendees, partners, exhibitors, site workers and staff has always been our top priority. As we now cross the 16-weeks-out mark, it was time to transition to 100% focus on a virtual event.

“An all-virtual Design & Construction Week will be a different experience, but with it comes new opportunities to reach an even larger audience that would not have been able to

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Washington Theater moves forward with renovation plans



a large room


© Provided by KHQA Quincy/Hannibal


New plans are now in place to help bring a historic Quincy theater back to life.

The Washington Theater Commission approved an architectural plan for the 96-year-old theater this week.

It includes spending $70,000 to document the proposed use of the theater, develop a layout, and begin a new fundraising phase for the project.

The commission is working with a professional theater consultant and architect called “Killis Almond.”

It’s been a key member in renovating more than 80 historic theaters.

Commission President Brian Heinze says timing couldn’t be better for these unfolding plans.

“In the feasibility study, they said an opened theater — not just a movie theater but a multi-purpose venue — could bring up to $4 million into the city. So the timing is right between the riverfront restoration and what they want to do and the downtown revitalization,” Heinze said.

The plan will be funded entirely by fundraising efforts of friends of the Washington Theater.

The plan will be presented to the Quincy City Council for approval.

The City of Quincy owns Washington Theater.

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Conroe moves forward with $320K drainage study

The city of Conroe is moving forward with a study of Alligator Creek to determine the next steps on improving the drainage on the waterway that winds through downtown Conroe.

On Thursday, the council approved a $320,265 contract with Conroe-based Halff Associates Inc. to create a master drainage plan, focused on Alligator Creek, with the goal to provide prioritized needs and improvements and to help facilitate grant funding that is available.

“With this plan, we can apply for grant fund that we could not before because we did not have a master plan,” said Tommy Woolley, director of capital improvements and transportation.

According to information provided by Halff officials to the city, the plan will focus on projects to reduce the flood risk for all major watersheds within the city limits, specifically Alligator Creek. The other watersheds included will be West Fork of the San Jacinto River, White Oak Creek, Live Oak Branch, Grand Lake Creek, Silverdale Creek, Stewarts Creek and Little Caney Creek.

The study will be divided into six tasks, project management, watershed review, flood risk evaluation, recommendations, implementation strategy and documentation.

According to a 2008 study by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Conroe area is subject to tropical storms and rainfall over extended time periods is not uncommon for the area. Historically, Stewarts and Alligator Creeks have been the major threats to flooding.

The study is expected to take about a year to complete.

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Bruna’s Cheese Bread Moves From Food Truck to Cottage Bakery

“It’s a bread meant to be eaten fresh out of the oven,” says Bruna Piauí Graf, founder of Bruna’s Cheese Bread. “It can be good later, but I don’t suggest that.” Brazilian pão de queijo — or cheese bread — are savory puff pastries made with gluten-free tapioca flour and cheese. They’re served everywhere in Brazil, and now, thanks to Graf, here in Denver as well.

Graf says she started Bruna’s Cheese Bread because she couldn’t find good pão de queijo in Denver. In 2019, she used the bread as inspiration for a food truck serving Brazilian sandwiches. But when this year’s pandemic ended plans for owning the food truck, Graf turned to selling the pre-made dough as it’s often found in Brazil: frozen and ready to be baked in the oven.

Pão de queijo originated in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. The key ingredient, tapioca flour, comes from the yuca plant found there. Yuca, different from yucca, is a starchy tuber long used by Brazilian indigenous peoples to make bread. The process of extracting the flour involves peeling and grating the tuber, soaking it and letting it dry. When colonizers brought enslaved African people to the area, they learned to use the leftover tapioca starch to make their own bread, subsidizing the meager food they were given.

Years later, in the 19th century, Minas Gerais became known for producing a hard, salty Minas cheese. The cheese, plus milk and eggs, were added to the pão de queijo recipe, and it soon became a national delicacy.

Graf started making cheese bread here in Denver in 2019.

Graf started making cheese bread here in Denver in 2019.

Courtesy of Bruna’s Cheese Bread

Graf remembers eating pão de queijo while growing up in Barau, Brazil. “I would always go with my friends and family as a teenager to this [cafe], and

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