neighborhood

Father and Son Open New Hardware Store Franchise in Their Neighborhood

Warren Pegram and his stepson, Charlston Austin, have opened an Ace Hardware franchise in their neighborhood in the city of South Fulton, Georgia. It is one of the first hardware stores in their community.

According to the City of South Fulton Observer, the new store is a great addition to the current retail lineup at the Old National Marketplace. Its opening came right on time as the city has been encouraging more small businesses to do business in the area.

The Ace Hardware franchise promises to particularly offer home improvement products that are most needed in the community. Pegram said that unlike other franchises, they will also sell party rental equipment such as commercial grade snow cone machines, inflatables, popcorn machines, and many more.

Austin, who used to work as a former retail account executive, is making sure to connect with the community to know the products they need and to be able to provide it in their hardware store. His father, on the other hand, is ensuring the high level of customer service so everyone who comes to the store will have an awesome shopping experience.

Because of the newest hardware store in the area, residents in the community don’t have to go further away for their home improvement needs. They are also hoping to inspire the younger generations to become entrepreneurs.

To keep their customers safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, they are currently offering pick-up and delivery options. They are located at 6385 Old National Hwy Suite 120, South Fulton, GA.

This article was originally published by BlackBusiness.com.

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Tiny homes coming to Kalamazoo’s Northside neighborhood as affordable housing solution

KALAMAZOO, MI — The first phase of the Tiny Houses of HOPE project will break ground in Kalamazoo on Thursday, Oct. 8.

The first phase will focus on Kalamazoo’s Northside neighborhood adding six tiny homes and a center for wrap-around services for the nonprofit Helping Other People Exceed (HOPE) thru Navigation.

The $500,000 project has been years in the making as HOPE Thru Navigation founder Gwendolyn Hooker was adamant about creating an affordable housing solution for the population her nonprofit serves.

Related: Affordable tiny home neighborhood planned in Kalamazoo

The tiny homes will be available for those who have been incarcerated, have at least one year of sobriety under their belt and are currently employed. Hooker said she already has 200 candidates in Kalamazoo who fit this description.

Through her work at HOPE thru Navigation, Hooker said she was continually seeing clients couch surfing because they were turned away from landlords based on their substance abuse or criminal background.

Hooker zeroed in on housing for this population based on studies showing that relapse and recidivism rates drop by 70% if a person leaving treatment or prison has housing and employment in the first 45 days.

“Everybody knew that it was a need, but a lot of people were not loving the idea of the demographic,” Hooker said. “I was immovable on that. That was the main part of the project that couldn’t be changed.”

The plan eventually received financial backing from Kalamazoo Community Foundation and Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) Kalamazoo. Community members also came together to donate $51,000.

“Not folks that were rich or have foundations, but just folks who care about equity and housing for everybody,” Hooker said. “We started out with raising money from the community first, because we wanted to make sure that we have community

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‘We won’t watch our neighborhood burn’: Neighbor refused to evacuate Glass Fire to help save homes in Napa County

ANGWIN, Calif. (KGO) — The small town of Angwin in Napa County was evacuated Tuesday afternoon after fear the Glass Fire may move into the small community home to 3,800 people.

Unlike most people, Dave Babcock stayed behind.

“I’ve been going around here cleaning out the gutters on this side of the street… often when you see houses go up… it’s because of the gutters,” he said.

RELATED: Track wildfires across Bay Area, other parts of CA with this interactive map

Babcock considers himself an ordinary guy, but to his neighbors he’s a hero.

“I was up most of the night watering down the houses and watching where it was going,” he said.

Babcock and his neighbor have been taking turns staying up to keep an eye on six homes along their street.

“We won’t watch our neighborhood burn.”

RELATED: Glass Fire devastation will be ‘new beginning’ for famed Meadowood Resort, manager says

“This is brave what you’re doing,” ABC7 News reporter Stephanie Sierra said. “Do you get scared?”

“No I’m a firm believer in God,” he replied. “I hope we get through this.”

Evacuee William Kenner is also relying on his faith – even though he already lost everything.

“12 vehicles, two cabins, it’s been in my family for 105 years. Yep, all gone,” said Kenner.

Now, he’s committed to helping others not go through the same pain.

“I’m trying to protect my friends place, it burned all the way around there last month,” he said. “We’re just expecting it to come over the hill… we’re doing the best we can.”

Get the latest updates and videos on the Glass Incident here.

Copyright © 2020 KGO-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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It’s not just your neighborhood. Contractors are incredibly busy with home renovations

From the sound of things in some neighborhoods, you might not think the economic downturn has been all that severe in Massachusetts.



a person standing in front of a building: President and owner of Golden Builder Construction Tomasa Pujol at a residential job site in Dorchester.


© Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff
President and owner of Golden Builder Construction Tomasa Pujol at a residential job site in Dorchester.

Saw blades are buzzing, nail guns are popping, and drills are spinning as contractors descend on home renovation projects in huge numbers. It’s a striking aberration in an economy where many businesses continue to suffer and unemployment remains high.

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The activity is also another indication of how unevenly the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic has been distributed. Some homeowners ― often those whose incomes have not taken a hit ― have reduced costs for commuting, travel and other expenses, giving them more discretionary income. At the same time, interest rates for home equity loans and mortgages are historically low, making it cheap to borrow money.

And many people have spent an unprecedented number of hours at home, giving them a clear-eyed understanding about what they love — and hate — about their homes.

“The pandemic, especially for people in the middle class and the upper middle class has created this bubble,” said Chris Parish, a Franklin homeowner searching for a contractor who’s not too busy to take on a small bathroom renovation sometime soon. “We’re all thinking the same thing at the same time, which is, we can’t go anywhere, so we should get the most out of the space.”

Contractors around Boston say they experienced a huge demand for services this summer that has extended into fall — especially for modest projects such as adding a backyard deck or fence. The trend is helping to offset the loss of work builders suffered earlier in the year when larger commercial jobs were put on hold

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Officials preview ideas for choice neighborhood transformation, remind that residents need to remain at the center

Upcoming initiatives in Newport News’ Marshall-Ridley neighborhood transformation efforts may include a seafood market, commercial kitchen and funds to help homeowners spruce up their properties to go along with new apartments and replacement of Ridley Circle apartments.

As officials reviewed building plans and progress, they expressed several times they needed to focus on the residents of the neighborhood.

The City Council held a work session Sept. 15 to discuss the Choice Neighborhood Initiative.

Ricky Burgess, a city councilman in Pittsburgh, advised the Newport News council to remember “(this) process is not primarily about housing — this is about transforming families and helping families so they have a greater chance at success.” Along with housing, Burgess, who helped lead choice neighborhood transformation efforts in Pittsburgh, said new construction there involved community and resource centers, access to transportation and a new charter school.

The council agreed that the focus is not just on transforming the physical community, but the lives of the people there.

“We need total commitment to make this a reality,” Mayor McKinley Price said. He said the city needed to commit through its actions and its budget so that five years from now, they aren’t looking at a new neighborhood with the same issues that have lingered for decades. That would be a waste of time and money, he said.

The Marshall-Ridley Choice Neighborhood encompasses the Ridley Place and Marshall Courts public housing and much of the surrounding neighborhood. The area has higher rates of poverty and unemployment than the rest of the city.

The Newport News Redevelopment and Housing Authority is relocating residents from Ridley Place in preparation of the apartments being torn down and eventually replaced. She said 150 households have vouchers and more than 100 have moved or have new housing in place. The neighborhood has

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