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This season’s newest home design books offer something for every style

Interior design books out this fall document one of the year’s strongest décor trends: color, and loads of it. Designers such as Mark D. Sikes, Markham Roberts, Katie Ridder and James Farmer all show a lively mix of color, pattern and style in their recent projects.

Every page is full of inspiration for your own projects, showing you how to mix and match — or not match at all — and love it.

Dominic Bradbury’s new architecture book, “The Iconic American House,” compiles 50 well-known iconic and innovative homes built in the U.S. since 1902. They’re traditional and modern, and each comes with an interesting story.

Here are six new architecture and design books worth a closer look.

“The Iconic American House,” by Dominic Bradbury

(Thames & Hudson; $65; 320 pp.)

You’ve heard of Philip Johnson’s Glass House, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater, Edith Wharton’s The Mount and the Annenbergs’ Sunnylands spread in Rancho Mirage, Calif. Those four and 46 other innovative American homes have been compiled into Dominic Bradbury’s new book, “The Iconic American House.”

Bradbury’s goal was to showcase the American dream of home ownership through this group of homes that have captured the imagination of many. Some have become house museums, open for all to see, and if you can’t get out to see them in person, you can see photos and read the back stories in Bradbury’s book, which published Oct. 6.

They’re featured chronologically, from the day they were built, reaching back to Wharton’s 1902 home and ending with the 2010 Pierre in the San Juan Islands, between Washington state and Canada.

“More Beautiful: All American Decoration,” by Mark D. Sikes

(Rizzoli; $45; 272 pp.)

Mark D. Sikes’ love of blue and white shines through in his second book, a look at five homes in different

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Home Depot Has Long Dominated America’s Newest Pastime: Home Improvement Projects

It all started with a firing—a very foolish one.

In 1978, Bernie Marcus and Arthur Blank were executives at Handy Dan, a home improvement chain based in Southern California. Despite the business being very profitable, the pair had begun to tinker with a new idea. By lowering prices, they found, the stores’ volume shot up, making Handy Dan even more money. The executives had planned to implement that strategy systemwide, but they never got the chance. Corporate raider Sanford C. Sigoloff—who liked to call himself the “Skillful Scalpel”—took over the company, and deciding to save himself two salaries, got rid of Marcus and Blank.

That one decision probably prevented Handy Dan from becoming America’s home improvement leader. Instead, that honor would go to a place called The Home Depot.

Recruiting investment banker Ken Langone and retailer Pat Farrah, who’d run National Lumber and Supply Company, Marcus and Blank opened up a one-stop warehouse destination with everything a homeowner could want, staffed by knowledgeable salespeople and all selling at discount prices. 

“We believed from the start that if we brought the customer quality merchandise at the right price and offered excellent service, we could change retailing in the United States,” Marcus said in a 2008 interview with Entrepreneur.

As we know, they did just that. The first Home Depot opened in Atlanta in the summer of 1979. By years end, there were three more. Home Depot officially became the largest home improvement retailer in America by 1990, and today it has nearly 2,300 stores.

In recent months, Home Depot has been America’s go-to home center in ways it never imagined. After the pandemic sealed much of the citizenry behind closed doors, Americans made home improvement into a new national pastime. For Q2 2020, the chain’s net sales soared more than 23%

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