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Wisconsin Residents React to Damage Caused to Homes and Businesses During Chaotic Night In Wauwatosa

WAUWATOSA, Wisc. — A caravan of Black Lives Matter protesters had made it about 6 miles from Milwaukee to Wauwatosa Wednesday evening before being stopped by police in riot gear. Rioters in the crowd began to throw projectiles at the police line, prompting officers to deploy tear gas and pepper balls.

It was a scene that has been played out, too often, in American cities since late May, except this time it was not taking place in the downtown area of a major city. It was happening in residential neighborhoods. The protests were sparked after Wauwatosa officer Joseph Mensah was not charged in a shooting that led to the death of 17-year-old Alvin Cole. Cole was killed on February 2 when he opened fire on officers.

Prior to the confrontation, some in the BLM crowd had smashed windows or threw large rocks through windows of businesses along their path. Businesses damaged included a Kumon tutoring center and a dry cleaners, but rioters did not just target stores.

A small apartment complex was then targeted, with people again throwing rocks through the windows. This time other people in the crowd begged the agitators to stop because that was too far even for them. It only stopped after some ran up to prevent more destruction, but by then the damage was already done.

Jeff, the owner of the apartment complex, was busy at work Thursday morning to clean up the mess and was making the repairs to the building.

He told Townhall four people lived in one of the apartment complexes, but only one person was home at the time it was

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Glass Fire rips through more of Wine Country Thursday night

Firefighters stood guard outside some of the country’s most renowned vineyards and the homes that surround them Thursday night as the Glass Fire continued to encroach on the communities of Calistoga and St. Helena — the heart of California’s famed Wine Country.

The blaze had engulfed 60,148 acres by Friday morning, burning most actively in the hills north of Calistoga and east of St. Helena. At least one home outside St. Helena was among the 220 residences to have burned down. A house on the 1300 block of Tucker Road was “fully involved,” late Thursday night according to Cal Fire, and had flames jetting out windows of both its two stories.

  • CALISTOGA, CA – OCTOBER 2: Firefighters battle a fire at a home along Tucker Road in Calistoga, Calif., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. The Glass Fire, already the fifth largest of the 23 major fires burning in the state, has engulfed 58,880 acres in the North Bay and damaged or destroyed nearly 400 buildings. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)

  • CALISTOGA, CA – OCTOBER 2: Firefighters battle a fire at a home along Tucker Road in Calistoga, Calif., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. The Glass Fire, already the fifth largest of the 23 major fires burning in the state, has engulfed 58,880 acres in the North Bay and damaged or destroyed nearly 400 buildings. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)

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  • CALISTOGA, CA – OCTOBER 2: A home along Tucker Road burns in Calistoga, Calif., on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. The Glass Fire, already the fifth largest of the 23 major fires burning in the state, has engulfed 58,880 acres in the North Bay and damaged or destroyed nearly 400 buildings. (Anda Chu/Bay Area News Group)

  • CALISTOGA, CA – OCTOBER 2: Firefighters battle a fire

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Sonoma County fire crews dig in, spend the night beating flames back from homes

Firefighters were defending homes in the thickly wooded Los Alamos Road canyon Monday morning, where the Shady fire took hold in Sonoma County as embers from a wind-driven blaze in Napa County pushed west.

Crews were prepared to stay through the night to shield homes, though they had marked some losses.

Leading a strike team from Sonoma County agencies, Sebastopol Fire Battalion Chief Jack Piccinini said they were among the first to start defending homes on Los Alamos Road about 8:30 p.m. as the fire burned south from St. Helena Road.

They had been fighting the Glass fire in Napa County and insisted on being sent to Sonoma County when spot fires from that fire quickly started growing into significant threats to Santa Rosa.

“Our first objective was to get up here and make sure people were getting out,” Piccinini said. “There were a lot of people coming down the mountain as we were coming up.”

His crews helped people get animals into trailers and fixed a flat tire for people stymied as they tried to leave a house on a ridge above the road. Piccinini said the fire was on both sides of the road by the time they helped those people get on their way.

They went from house to house in this densely forested community, defending those they could. Some homes were lost to the flames.

As the fire front pushed south and west toward Highway 12 and the more densely settled floor of Sonoma Valley, Piccinini said his strike team would stay on the road overnight to ensure those homes they had saved remained protected from another spot fire or flare up.

“If we leave the structures too early then we come up and find it’s burned,” Piccinini said. “We can’t leave.”

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