Nightmare

’Nightmare’ intersection in Catasauqua, a known problem for decades, gets green light for improvements

It’s been said by many a public official and resident that turning left onto Race Street from Lehigh Street in Catasauqua is like “taking your life into your hands.”



a car driving down a busy street: Traffic begins to back up along Lehigh Street attempting, to exit onto Race Street Wednesday in Catasauqua. Borough officials voted narrowly to allow PennDOT to move forward with improvements to the Race and Lehigh Street intersection, long the bane of residents and commuters.


© Rick Kintzel/The Morning Call/The Morning Call/TNS
Traffic begins to back up along Lehigh Street attempting, to exit onto Race Street Wednesday in Catasauqua. Borough officials voted narrowly to allow PennDOT to move forward with improvements to the Race and Lehigh Street intersection, long the bane of residents and commuters.

Living in a house near the three-point intersection, Joshua Fritz has a prime-time view of its traffic woes, the bane of residents and commuters for decades. During rush hour, he said, he witnesses close calls almost every other day.

Loading...

Load Error

It’s always dicey to escape his driveway as cars coming from the opposite direction make similar quick escapes during breaks in traffic.

“For me to get out of here, I have to drive like I’m in New York City,” he said.

The intersection was the subject of a PennDOT traffic signal study in 1979. It’s been called a “nightmare” intersection in newspaper articles since the 1990s. Regional planners started drawing up improvement concepts as early as 2000.

Generations later on Monday night, Catasauqua officials signed the official resolutions necessary to allow PennDOT’s proposed $12 million to $14 million improvement project to move forward, which involves widening roads and installing three traffic signals at Race Street’s intersections with Lehigh, Front and Second Streets. Race Street is a state road, and the Federal Highway Administration and PennDOT are funding the improvements.



a car parked on the side of the street: Traffic begins to back up along Lehigh Street attempting to exit onto Race Street Wednesday in Catasauqua. Borough officials voted narrowly to allow PennDOT to move forward with improvements to the Race and Lehigh Street intersection, long the bane of residents and commuters.


© Rick Kintzel/The Morning Call/The Morning Call/TNS
Traffic begins to back up along Lehigh Street attempting to exit onto Race Street Wednesday in Catasauqua. Borough officials voted narrowly to allow PennDOT to move forward with improvements to the Race and Lehigh

Continue Reading

How to Avoid a Remodeling Contractor Nightmare

While home remodeling can be done during any time of the year, spring and summer are the most popular. Consequently, it is a time when home owners need to be extra cautious about rushing into a home reconstruction project. Why? Because it is a time when unscrupulous contractors will take advantage of the unsuspecting homeowner who does do their homework.

Just a quick perusal of the Internet will result in hundreds of contractor remodeling project nightmares. But you don't have to be a victim. Use the following tips to be sure you are one of the thousands of home remodeling success stories.

1. Determine whether or not it would be beneficial to move out of your home during the remodel or if staying put won't create a problem. Depending on the type of remodel, this could be the difference between stress or no stress. Think about the area to be remodeled, the duration of the project and how much of your family's routine will be affected, then decided.

2. Talk to several people to learn what contractors, architects, designers and any specialist they recommend. Get as much information form people – especially those who were not satisfied- to determine if you will be able to work with a specific professional.

3. Meet with the prospective companies and explain to them what you envision. If at all possible, have artist or architectural renderings for them to look it. Listen to what they have to say, but be sure that they understand what you want to accomplish based on the budget you have to spend.

4. Don't try to be your own general contractor. Hire one you can trust and then take time to work with them. Let them know your budget, timeline, style, and any other non-negotiable elements of the job. …

Continue Reading