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Young people return to their parents’ homes in the US due to COVID-19


6 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


This story originally appeared on Alto Nivel

By Antonio Sandoval

For the first time in nine decades , young adults have returned to parental homes at a rate not seen since the Great Depression era of the 1930s , according to an analysis by the Pew Research Center with data from the United States Census Bureau.

The obvious cause was the loss of job or decrease in income that the pandemic brought with it. According to the source, at the end of July the total number of young adults who lived with one of their parents or with both grew to 26.6 million , which meant an increase of 2.6 million compared to February , just before the devastating impact of the pandemic in the world’s largest economy.

This measurement includes only young people between 18 and 29 years of age and, according to the figures, the phenomenon was highly concentrated in the segment of young people between 18 and 24 years of age, the age of greatest economic vulnerability in adulthood. In percentage terms, it means that 52 percent of young people in the analyzed age range , 18 to 29 years old, live with their parents, the highest rate since the Great Depression era.

In fact, the Pew Research Center indicates that this rate of 52 percent is already even higher than the 48 percent reported in 1940 during the end of the Great Depression and the entry of the United States into World War II, with no accurate figures. in the worst part of the economic crash of the 1930s, so the most recent measurement is in fact the largest ever observed in

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Heartwarming Christmas Gift Ideas For Elderly Parents

It’s only two months away until Christmas time comes again. But for many of us, preparations for the perfect gift are already underway.

Now, if you’re reading this, you probably already know the grand gift you’re giving your elderly folks. It could be something for the kitchen for mom, or perhaps an accessory for dad’s toolshed in the garage. But if you want to add that extra smile on their faces and warmth in their heart, you don’t need to spend that much to do that.

This here could be a lot of fun, especially if you let your creativity run freely. But in case if you’re willing to spend a bit more, Quanta CBD has top-of-the-line affordable products that will be a great addition to the overall well-being of your beloved parents. That, in itself, is already a priceless gift they’re guaranteed to appreciate.

For Sentimental Parents: A Collection of Old Family Photos

Newsweek AMPLIFY - Christmas Gifts Elderly Parents

We all have that one relative. It’s that uncle or aunt who was, fortunately, able to collect old photos from family reunions from decades ago. We’re talking about their pre-grey hair days of the 70s and 80s when youth and Father Time were still on their side.

Or maybe you yourself managed to get hold of photographic mementos from a Disneyland family trip from a few years back. Whatever it is, it would be a nice trip to memory lane with colorful stories and anecdotes for the ages.

You can present this in a form of a scrapbook and tell little stories through these images. That’ll surely make their year.

For Foodie Parents: Cook Their Favorite For Christmas Dinner

Newsweek AMPLIFY - Christmas Gifts Elderly Parents

If you have foodies for parents, they likely took you to a wide range of restaurants of varying cuisines. You’ve likely tasted the best food and created

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Mom Warns Parents After Toddler Nearly Lost Eyesight From Playing With Squirting Bath Toys

PLAINFIELD, Ill. (CBS) — A Plainfield mom has an urgent warning for parents after her toddler was not only hospitalized but could also have permanent eye damage from a bath toy you may have in your home.

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Baylor loves cars and playing with his big brother and sister. He also has big blue eyes.

“I just remember praying, ‘Please don’t take his eyes. He has such pretty eyes,” said Baylor’s mom, Eden Strong.

“My 2-year-old son was just having a bath,” she said. “And what looked like a little bit of irritation from getting water in his eye from the tub toys, and then it turned into full blown cellulitis.”

She said over a period of 12 hours his eye went from pink to infected. Pictures from her now-viral facebook post show the fast progression.

“His eye was protruding from his face,” she said. “It was very obscured. He was running a raging fever.”

The toddler was given IV antibiotics and then a CAT scan.

“They explained that if it moved to his retina it could permanently cause blindness or if it moved to his brain it could be a lot worse,” Strong said.

The culprit was a squirting bath toy.

“I came to find out later that because the water is never fully expelled from those types of toys that they can just grow bacteria that you can’t stop,” she said.

Strong said she hopes manufacturers take a closer look at the toys they are producing.

“I’ve been shocked,” she said. “I have a completely full inbox with parents sending me pictures of their children who have gone through the same thing. It really does seem to be a design issue across all manufacturers and not just one specific one, so I really hope even those people

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Chefs are parents, too. Here are their tips if your kitchen is now a makeshift school cafeteria

Yahya Noor from East Boston’s Tawakal Halal Café has seven kids — four of whom started virtual class last week — so he knows what he’s talking about.

“Think about it like going to school all day, where you don’t have the option to just go to the cafeteria,” he says. Instead, he packs Tupperware containers of lunches and snacks the night before for easy distribution at set times so his kids don’t get distracted. A favorite? Basmati rice with wild-caught salmon from Market Basket (his go-to grocery store), mozzarella cheese sticks, and grapes.

Yahya Noor of Tawakal Halal Café.
Yahya Noor of Tawakal Halal Café.Handout

Get creative at breakfast

If your kid eats on the fly, use breakfast as the main meal. Valentine Howell from Krasi in the Back Bay has an 11-year-old daughter with an “eclectic” palate and a remote curriculum in Roslindale. He fashions breakfast “sushi” with a banana rolled in Greek yogurt or peanut butter, then rolled again in her favorite cereal (she likes Fruity Pebbles; your mileage may vary). He then slices it into bite-sized pieces. “It looks like fun kid’s sushi, it gets them to eat yogurt, and they often want to make it themselves,” he says.

Shop the sales

Heather Costa from Back Bay’s Revolution Health Kitchen, also at Time Out Market Boston, stocks up on organic products at Aldi. “Salsa, spices, pastas — they have a ton of organic products that are so much cheaper,” she says. (One favorite: Kite Hill vegan cream cheese.) She stores food for her remote Somerville third-grader in a Kitsure 30-ounce stainless steel Thermos, which is larger than other brands and comes with a folding spoon.

Rice is nice

Tom Fosnot from Lincoln’s Real has three kids enrolled in remote learning. His secret? Cooking a big batch of rice on the weekend

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I moved into my in-laws’ home. My husband wants to pay his parents’ mortgage, but it will come out of my income. How can I protect myself?

Dear Moneyist,

I got married recently and moved into my husband’s house that he shares with his parents. (His name and his parents’ name are on the deed.) Currently, we pay a small amount for rent, but my husband hopes to take on the mortgage of the house over the next couple of years. I am the breadwinner, and so the majority (or even all) of the money that would go towards the mortgage would be coming from me.

Before fully committing to this, are there any precautions I need to take? Or what are the risks I could be facing? I am worried about what would happen if I end up paying off their home, and they want to sell it or my in-laws pass away, or if they decide to give their share of the house to my husband’s sister, or if my husband and I separate (which is more of a worse-case scenario).

In all those cases would I be entitled to anything with the house? Unfortunately, you can sometimes get screwed over dealing with family. How can I prevent this from happening? I do want to help pay the mortgage. I would like to think my husband and his family would not do anything untoward, but I still would like to take precautions. I live in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Thank you for your help.

Daughter-in-law

The Moneyist: My sister-in-law moved in with her mother, changed her will, set up a new trust and inherited everything. Is it too late to claim what rightfully belongs to us?

Dear Daughter-in-law,

It’s not a good idea to use marital funds to pay off your in-laws’ mortgage, particularly given all of the potential scenarios you lay out. There are probably a few more that you have not thought

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