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Young people return to their parents’ homes in the US due to COVID-19


6 min read

This article was translated from our Spanish edition using AI technologies. Errors may exist due to this process.


This story originally appeared on Alto Nivel

By Antonio Sandoval

For the first time in nine decades , young adults have returned to parental homes at a rate not seen since the Great Depression era of the 1930s , according to an analysis by the Pew Research Center with data from the United States Census Bureau.

The obvious cause was the loss of job or decrease in income that the pandemic brought with it. According to the source, at the end of July the total number of young adults who lived with one of their parents or with both grew to 26.6 million , which meant an increase of 2.6 million compared to February , just before the devastating impact of the pandemic in the world’s largest economy.

This measurement includes only young people between 18 and 29 years of age and, according to the figures, the phenomenon was highly concentrated in the segment of young people between 18 and 24 years of age, the age of greatest economic vulnerability in adulthood. In percentage terms, it means that 52 percent of young people in the analyzed age range , 18 to 29 years old, live with their parents, the highest rate since the Great Depression era.

In fact, the Pew Research Center indicates that this rate of 52 percent is already even higher than the 48 percent reported in 1940 during the end of the Great Depression and the entry of the United States into World War II, with no accurate figures. in the worst part of the economic crash of the 1930s, so the most recent measurement is in fact the largest ever observed in

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Twelve per cent of people don’t lock their homes

When you leave your home, do you lock your door?

Around 12 per cent of Kiwis don’t, according to a survey. Across the entire population, that’s equivalent to 218,880 households not securing their property.

“A worrying number of people continue to put themselves at risk,” said Kevin McHugh, publisher of financial research website Finder in New Zealand.

“Simple things like failing to lock your front door at night make you an easy target for burglars.”

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* Auckland, Christchurch and Hamilton the country’s burglary hotspots, research finds
* Asbestos, smells, crime rate Kiwi buyers’ top turn-offs, survey shows

Looking at other available safety measures, the survey found almost half of the 2001 respondents don’t have locks on their windows, and over 50 per cent don’t lock their garage when a car is parked inside.

Around 12 per cent of Kiwis don’t lock their house when they leave, a new survey has found.

Supplied

Around 12 per cent of Kiwis don’t lock their house when they leave, a new survey has found.

A police spokesperson said burglary and theft are usually crimes of opportunity.

“If you secure your property, in many cases an offender will move on. No community is completely crime-free,” the spokesperson said.

Previous research from Finder and New Zealand Police identified Auckland, Christchurch, Hamilton and Tauranga as the five most burgled places in the country between January 2017 and March 2020.

Between December 2019 and January 2020 there were around 13,090 burglaries reported nationwide, according to police data.

McHugh said there tends to be a spike in burglaries during holiday periods every year.

“It’s therefore important to be extra cautious right now– even small measures like locking your doors and

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Gov. J.B. Pritzker warns Illinois’ improvements have ‘cooled down’ as 2,818 more people test positive for COVID-19

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Lake County flagged at COVID-19 warning level as 2,818 more test positive statewide

AP Photos

Illinois’ coronavirus testing positivity rate inched upward for a third consecutive day Friday as public health officials announced another hefty caseload of 2,818 more people testing positive for COVID-19.

They were diagnosed among 71,599 tests submitted, raising the statewide average positivity rate over the last week to 3.8%. That number indicates how rapidly the virus is spreading — and that’s as high as it’s been in almost a month.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker warned this week that the state’s improvement from a midsummer resurgence has “cooled down.”

And while over the last few months, the state’s COVID-19 problem areas have popped up well beyond the Chicago area — mostly in central Illinois and downstate — the Democratic governor’s health team singled out north suburban Lake County for being among 26 counties considered to be at a coronavirus “warning level.”

Reporter Mitch Armentrout has the full story.


News

7:24 a.m. Downstate Rep. Mike Bost, an Illinois Trump campaign chair, tests positive for COVID-19

Downstate Rep. Mike Bost announced Friday he’s tested positive for COVID-19 after coming down with “a mild cough and a rapid loss of both taste and smell.”

The Republican congressman said in a statement that his public schedule is on hold and his meetings will go virtual as he isolates at home just a few weeks ahead of Election Day.

“We are taking this situation seriously and will continue to serve the people of Southern Illinois while doing our best to ensure their health and safety,” Bost said. “I will provide additional updates in the days ahead and am anxious to get back to work as soon as I make a full recovery.”

Read the full story here.


New cases

  • Public health officials
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Here’s what people are buying at home goods, home improvement stores and more | Food + Living

COVID-19 is shaping shopping behavior. That’s been bad news for retailers on many fronts — but certainly not all. Here’s a sampling some of the items shoppers have been snapping up for their homes.


Bon appetit

The Shops at Rockvale, located off Route 30 in East Lampeter Township, have seen a lower traffic count than usual over the past few months, says manager Kristi Burkholder. But sales reports show that those shoppers who are there are buying more things — especially if those things are related to eating at home, says Burkholder.

“The kitchen stores are out of control,” she says.

Foodie-focused business is also brisk at Zest! in Lititz. There, manager Elizabeth Elia says shoppers are increasingly investing in quality basics like kitchen scales. Pizza stones also are selling. So is anything having to do with bread.

“They’re getting serious about baking. One item that is selling like crazy now is the Danish bread whisk,” Elia says of the circular tool used for denser doughs and batters. “We can’t keep them in stock.”



Our food writer samples 12 varieties of Lancaster County apples


Going big

Tina Ator, owner of Olde Mill House Shoppes in Lancaster, says she has noticed a renewed interest in larger furniture pieces and lighting rather than smaller, “knick-knack-type” purchases.

Customers are looking ahead to the future too, specifically to Christmas gifts and holiday items. Ator says customers started asking her to display those in September.

“They don’t know what is going to happen, so they want to be prepared,” she says. “Some of them want to get it now while they are out and about.”



Gothic Revival touches grace houses, churches around Lancaster [architecture column, photos]


Project materials

From paint to tools, people are buying for do-it-yourself projects. Second-quarter revenue was up 30% over the same period last year at Lowe’s and 23% at Home Depot.

“Most of us are forced to

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Gunk from medieval bathrooms revealed people suffered from parasites

What could you possibly find in a toilet that’s been out of order for hundreds of years? Some ghastly things might be hiding in there, and it’s not what you might think.

There were obviously no porcelain seats or advanced plumbing in latrines 800 years ago. You went, and countless others went after you, unknowingly leaving behind evidence of what was crawling in an entire community’s guts. Think of all those TV commercials that relentlessly insist on probiotics for gut health. Probiotics might be trending, whether in pill or yogurt form, but they do help balance the intestinal microbiome—everything that lives in your guts. Scientists have now been able to find out what was lurking in the microbiomes of two cities during the 14th and 15th centuries, and it’s ugly.

Parasites thrive when you don’t have proper sanitation. The Middle Ages spawned the bubonic plague, so it has nowhere near the cleanest reputation in history. Cesspits from Jerusalem and Riga, Latvia are giving us a closer look the microbiomes of pre-industrial agricultural societies that might be able to provide insight into our own insides. While industrialization has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease, food allergies and obesity, microbial DNA in coprolites (fossilized feces) recovered from long-abandoned latrines has revealed that Medieval human microbiomes were plagued by parasites.

“Together, these findings provide a first glimpse into the rich prokaryotic and eukaryotic intestinal flora of pre-industrial agricultural populations, which may give a better context for interpreting the health of modern microbiomes,” said Kirsten Bos, a specialist in ancient bacterial DNA from the Max Planck Institute, who recently co-led a study published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

Gnarly things revealed themselves under the (literal) microscope. The eggs of parasitic worms were easily detected with microscopic analysis, but there were other

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