problems

‘We’re prepared’: Utah County election officials make improvements to prevent past problems

PROVO — Election officials in Utah County said they have made improvements to prevent issues that have plagued the county in the past.

After polling locations experienced long lines lasting more than three hours on midterm election night in 2018, Governor Gary Herbert criticized Utah County as the “epicenter of dysfunction.”

For next month’s general election, the county’s new clerk/auditor promises things will be better.

“When you look at what I’ve been able to accomplish in a short amount of time, it’s because I was able to secure the resources for the equipment and literally the best team in the state,” said Utah County Clerk/Auditor Amelia Powers Gardner.

Since Powers Gardner took office in 2019, she’s hired new staff and purchased new ballot-counting machines. She said they now have the largest scanners in the state, which can process 600 ballots per minute.

“I’ve worked tirelessly to make sure that my staff has the resources they need to serve those people,” she said.

Powers Gardner is expecting a lot of people to show up at polling locations on November 3 because this will be Utah County’s first presidential election with vote-by-mail and she worries that some may not be used to it.

“We have over-prepared for the people we expect at the polls,” she said. “We know that we’re going to have a lot. We’re prepared to serve three times the number people at the polls that voted in 2018.”

For those voting in person, she’s also implementing a new system to let voters check-in using their phones.

Utah County Clerk/Auditor Amelia Powers Gardner talks to KSL about improvements Utah County has made to prevent voting delays. (Photo: KSL TV)

“Then you can go wait in the comfort of your own car, listen to your own music, and when it’s your

Continue Reading

Residents still face problems with contractors two years after Hurricane Michael

BAY COUNTY, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) – Two years ago Hurricane Michael ravaged our area, and for some, they’re still feeling the effects.



text: We talk with a family living in a trailer after a contractor took their money without repairing their storm damaged home. We are looking at how much money has been stolen from home owners and insurance companies through contractors not doing the job they were hired to do.


© Provided by Dothan WTVY
We talk with a family living in a trailer after a contractor took their money without repairing their storm damaged home. We are looking at how much money has been stolen from home owners and insurance companies through contractors not doing the job they were hired to do.

Residents are still facing problems with fraudulent contractors.

Loading...

Load Error

“Whenever we first moved into the camper it was only supposed to be four months. Here we are almost two years later, same boat,” Bay County resident Kelsie Raffield said.

Raffield’s home has been unlivable for the past two years, but it’s not because of what you see, it’s because of what you don’t.

She said her supposed contractor stole nearly $130,000 of their insurance money.

“The license number was real. He just wasn’t who he said he was,” Raffield said.

Now they’re trying to fix whatever they can on their own.

She looks back at all the signs telling them something wasn’t right.

“Logan did have to tell him like four different times, ‘hey this isn’t right what’s going on?’ You know, those red flags that you notice after you find out things about people,” Raffield said.

However, their case is just one of hundreds filed since Hurricane Michael.

“We’ve had 952 cases assigned to us since November of 2018 in the financial crimes section,” Corporal Dennis Rozier said. “Probably around 70% of those is actually contractor-related or complaints. A number of those are unfounded or they turn into civil; we have had a substantial number of them.”

Bay County Sheriff’s officials in the financial crimes unit say they are still working dozens.

“We’ve had

Continue Reading

State of Texas: TWC contractor reveals call center problems; Senate candidates prepare for debate

AUSTIN (Nexstar) – Imagine showing up to a job where you know that almost 75% of what you do will fail someone. What if a fireman failed to help someone in three out of four fire calls? What if a police officer failed to help clear three out of four 911 calls?

Day, after day.

That’s what a contractor helping field calls for the Texas Workforce Commission told us was going on inside some of the agency’s call centers. The contractor, who asked to not be identified in this report, told KXAN the problem facing nearly every caller is that their call may be answered by people who have no way to help Texans calling for help with their unemployment problems.

This worker said they’re unable to help about three-quarters of the people who call with unemployment problems.

Since the pandemic hit in mid-March, hundreds of unemployed Texans wrote to us, all telling the same story: thousands of calls to the TWC’s lone toll-free number are never answered. The few who have connected are likely to find themselves on the line with one of 1,600 contracted customer service representatives.

At first, they think their prayers are answered and the weeks – sometimes months – of waiting for their unemployment benefits is over.

RELATED: Planning to appeal a TWC decision, prepare for 18-week wait

Then, the contractor reads from the script they use when they answer a call: “I am limited to the types of questions I can answer.”

That’s led to many unemployed Texans hitting a dead-end, following a series of calls to the TWC, and never finding help.

In April, the bosses inside the TWC were scrambling. As state and local stay-at-home orders began locking Texans down in mid-March, millions lost their jobs and headed straight for the unemployment

Continue Reading

Covid ‘Testing Hell’: Devices Given to Nursing Homes Bring New Problems

“There’s no mechanism in place for reporting,” said Kim Schilling, the vice president of health services at Friendship Haven, which runs a nursing home in rural Iowa. “We were on the phone yesterday trying to figure this out with the department of public health and it was very overwhelming for them too.”

Katie Smith Sloan, the president of LeadingAge, an association of nonprofit providers of aging services, said the Trump administration’s focus on fines and stringent reporting requirements were the wrong approach to addressing a crisis that was aggravated by federal inaction in the early months of the pandemic.

“For seven months, nursing homes have been saving and protecting lives while dealing with staffing shortages, testing and personal protective equipment challenges and growing unexpected costs,” she said.

David Grabowski, a health care policy expert at Harvard Medical School, described the federal rapid-test program as “a positive step but late in the game,” and said Washington should do more to address the systemic financial and staffing problems that have long bedeviled the industry’s efforts to shield vulnerable residents from infectious pathogens. Because federal reimbursements do not cover the full cost of care in much of the country, nursing home operators who serve predominantly Medicaid patients say they often lack the money to hire enough skilled workers willing to take on a grueling job that the pandemic has made increasingly stressful and fraught with risk.

“I don’t have a problem penalizing nursing homes guilty of gross negligence, but my sense is that most of the facilities out there have been doing their best despite dealing with sick workers, a lack of resources and poor guidance from the federal government,” Mr. Grabowski said. “Putting efforts into training workers on infection control, boosting wages and offering paid sick leave would be a better approach.”

Continue Reading

5 Most Common Roof Problems Roofing Contractors Can Take Care Of

The roof makes one of the most important parts of your home or property. This is the part that directly defends you against harmful environmental and climatic elements. Your roofing system should therefore be designed to last long and keep your valuables safe and protected. However, depending on the type of roof you have installed and the conditions in your location, it is not uncommon to face several roof issues some of which require professional repairs or even call for roof replacements.

Fortunately, roofing contractors have what it takes to restore your roof and they are able to take care of any problem you could be facing with your roof. But considering that some of the problems can be costly, it is best that you have regular roof inspections and maintenance so that small issues are handled before they develop into bigger expensive ones. Below are the most common roof issues you might face.

1. Shingle damage – The aesthetic roofing option protects underlying structures of the roof from the elements. But over time they can weaken because of UV rays, wind and rain. Warped shingles, missing or broken shingles will necessitate roof repairs and your roofing contractor will be able to offer the solutions that you need for this.

2. Roof leaks – They are major roofing problems and they always should be fixed as soon as they are identified before they cause damage to your property and valuables. Because some of the leaks can be hard to identify until there is clear water damage signs, you are safer scheduling regular inspection of the roof and property to ensure that the roof is watertight and to have any problem areas handled before they develop into anything major.

3. Ponding water – If you notice standing water on the roof, …

Continue Reading